ARC and NORC at Univ. of Chicago

President Donald Trump’s call to implement the death penalty for drug traffickers grabbed headlines Monday. But public health officials within the Trump administration are stressing other elements of the president’s plan to address the opioid crisis.

Acting Director for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Anne Schuchat, outlined her agency’s plans for the Ohio Valley, which has some of the nation’s highest rates of addiction and overdose deaths.


This week in Kentucky politics, lawmakers retreated behind closed doors to begin hammering out a compromise on the state budget for the next two years; a bill that would shield personal cell phones and computers from records requests drew fire from open government advocates; and a common type of abortion would be banned under a bill that is nearing final passage out of the legislature.

Listen in the player below to this week’s edition of Kentucky Politics Distilled.

International Bluegrass Music Center

The opening date for the new International Bluegrass Music Center in Owensboro has been announced and plans are under way for a three-day grand opening celebration. 

It’s been a challenging construction process. The first general contractor, Evansville-based Peyronnin Constrution, began work in June 2016, then filed for bankruptcy in January 2017, causing an interruption of progress on the project.

In April 2017 the city of Owensboro awarded the contract to another Evansville-based company, Danco Construction. There were some delays due to materials and weather on the original Dec. 31, 2017 date for substantial completion, which didn't include much of the interior specialty work.

After the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., on Feb. 14, students across the country have raised their voices to protest gun violence: "Enough is enough." "Never again." "Not one more."

For Lela Free, a freshman in Marshall County, Ky., another phrase comes to mind.

"We should have been the last," she says.

Just weeks before the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida, a student armed with a handgun entered Marshall County High School in Kentucky. He killed two students, and injured 18 others.

Sen. Paul Disparages Budget Deal Again, This Time Via Tweets

Mar 23, 2018
Sen. Rand Paul's Twitter feed

When we last left off, an irked Sen. Rand Paul was blasting what he considered a bloated budget bill on the Senate floor. For hours, he forced Congress to delay passage until the federal government — briefly and imperceptibly — shut its doors.

Six weeks later, the Kentucky Republican had a similar beef Thursday with a followup 2,232-page measure that detailed how agencies will spend $1.3 trillion this year. This time he took to Twitter — again and again and again.

By around 8 p.m. EDT — when he said he was finished for the evening — he'd tweeted three dozen times about the bill, a stream of consciousness mix of discoveries, reflections and photos of the 55-year-old libertarian in action.

J. Tyler Franklin

A bill that would prohibit a common abortion procedure after the 11th week of pregnancy is nearing final passage from the Republican-led state legislature.

House Bill 454 would ban dilation and evacuation abortions after the 11th week of pregnancy except in medical emergencies. The procedure involves dilating the cervix and removing the fetus using surgical tools and suction.


Republican leaders of the state Senate have shelved a bill that would shield government officials’ personal computers and cell phones from open records requests, for now.

The amendment to House Bill 302 would change Kentucky’s open records laws to say that phone calls, text messages and emails sent or received on a privately-owned device would not be considered to be public records.

Official business transmitted through a personal email account would also be exempted.

Lisa Autry

A non-profit based in Louisville is recruiting Kentucky’s World War Two veterans for a special trip to Washington D.C. 

The Honor Flight Bluegrass Chapter is looking for at least 60 veterans from south central and west Kentucky to visit their memorials on D-Day.  The trip on June 5-6 is free and open to all World War Two veterans from every branch of the military. 

Ninety-two-year-old Charles Adams of Bowling Green took the trip about ten years ago.

"I enjoyed my flight completely. I got to see things I would have never seen before," said Adams. "If you know a veteran or are a veteran, don't be bashful about signing up for this because you deserve it."

Darius Barati

A survivor of the 1990s wars in the Balkans is visiting Bowling Green to say he believes forgiveness has it's place, as long as people don't forget what happened in the former Yugoslavia.

Kenin Trebincevic returned to his former home in Bosnia 20 years after the war ended.

His post-war visit resulted in the bestselling book, The Bosnia List.

English, Lucas, Priest, and Owsley

A new program in Bowling Green is aimed at increasing the diversity of the city’s legal and law enforcement communities.

The Legal Diversity Pipeline Project involves the Bowling Green Police Department, Warren County Courts, a Bowling Green law firm and two local high schools.

About 60 freshmen from Bowling Green High and Warren Central will meet Friday with Kentucky Supreme Court Chief Justice John Minton, Jr. and U.S. District Judge Robert Stivers, visit the 911 dispatch center at the city’s police department, and tour the Warren County Jail.


Owensboro | March 29

Lost River Sessions LIVE!

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LRS Live Replay: Leah Blevins & Lauren Farrah

Kentucky native Leah Blevins and Nashville singer-songwriter Lauren Farrah were our guests at March's Lost River Sessions LIVE from the Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green.

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