Western Kentucky University has filed a lawsuit against its student newspaper, arguing that the school is not required to release records related to sexual misconduct by university employees.

The WKU lawsuit against the College Heights Herald comes after a decision by Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear in January that the university is required to release Title IX records about investigations of sexual harassment by employees. The names and any other personal identifiers were to be redacted.

The lawsuit was filed in Warren Circuit Court by Kerrick Bachert, the law firm representing the university.

Michael Abate of the law firm Kaplan and Partners is representing the College Heights Herald.

“We think here in this in this case that the paper was absolutely entitled to receive these documents," Abate said. "And we think it’s incredibly unfortunate that it has come to a point where the university is suing its own student paper over conducting important and essential journalism meant to protect the students.”

Kentucky Hospital Assoc.

Since the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act the health care sector has grown by more than 19,000 jobs in the Ohio Valley region. And some economists who focus on health care policy are warning that many of those jobs could well hang in the balance as Congress considers changes to the Act.

One of the ACA’s effects in the Ohio Valley region has been to sharply reduce costs for what’s called uncompensated care — that’s the cost of caring for the uninsured.

Dustin Pugel is an economist at the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy, a nonpartisan research center. He said in Kentucky’s rural hospitals there’s been about a $150 million decrease in uncompensated care costs just in the first quarter after Medicaid expansion. He worries that if the ACA is repealed more people will lose their health insurance, and hospitals will have to cover that cost again.

  

Becca Schimmel

Temporary work is the fastest growing industry in Kentucky. Clerical work may come to mind when you think about temporary agencies, but that’s a bit of a misnomer these days. An increasing number of manufacturing positions are being filled by temporary agencies.

At Quality Personnel in Bowling Green, a marquee advertises the most recent job openings. One of those is for an automotive supplier, just what Aaron Rinehart is seeking. When he moved from Ohio to Kentucky, he said that he used the same agency to find work. Rinehart said he understands why most factories only hire through temp agencies, but he feels it still hurts the people who want full-time work.

“Not much of a choice really. It’s hard to get on anywhere full time now a days, companies don’t wanna just hire people through the door. So the only way to get on now a days is to go through a temp agency, and put your 90 days of work in, and basically just hope you get hired on after that,” Rinehart said.


Rhonda Miller

Heavy winds and rain moved through parts of our listening area Wednesday morning, causing power outages for thousands of residents.

Warren RECC said over 8,500 customers were without power in parts of Warren, Simpson, and Logan counties. Crews were sent to the affected areas.

Bowling Green Municipal Utilities said it had reports that several hundred residents were without power.

Parts of Warren County also saw roads impacted by heavy rains and flooding. First responders went house-to-house along part of Cemetary Road in Warren County to check on residents after several trees were knocked down. Reports of heavy damage to homes in that area came in early Wednesday, with half of a roof blown off one home on Cemetary Road.

The Courier-Journal reports as many as 13,000 customers in Jefferson and Oldham counties were without power Wednesday morning.

Stephen George

After President Donald Trump cited Gov. Matt Bevin’s claim that the Affordable Care Act is “unsustainable and collapsing” in Kentucky during his address to a joint session of Congress Tuesday night, former Kentucky governor Steve Beshear delivered the official Democratic response: Don’t dismantle Obamacare.

“You and your Republican allies in Congress seem determined to rip affordable health insurance away from millions of Americans who most need it,” Beshear said during his speech, which was broadcast from a diner in Lexington.

“Does the Affordable Care Act need some repairs? Sure it does,” Beshear said. “But so far, every Republican idea to replace the Affordable Care Act would reduce the number of Americans covered, despite your promises to the contrary.”

LRC Public Information

A bill that would centralize Kentucky’s driver’s licensing program and bring the state into compliance with federal ID card rules has received initial approval from a legislative committee.

The General Assembly needs to pass the bill in order to meet stricter REAL ID standards passed by Congress more than a decade ago.

If lawmakers don’t pass the legislation, starting June 6, Kentuckians will have to bring additional identification — like a passport — in order to access military bases.

And starting Jan. 22, 2018, Kentuckians would need additional identification to board domestic flights.

Jacob Ryan

A Bowling Green immigration attorney says many undocumented immigrants in the region are asking if they’ll be impacted by President Trump’s recent executive orders.

Brett Reynolds says it’s a hard question to answer amid court challenges and a lack of consistency in messages coming from Washington.

He’s advising people in the country illegally to lay low for the time being.

"My advice would be to just stay the course, and stay under the radar. Don't call attention to yourself. Don't get a speeding ticket, don't get a DUI. Anything like that is going to put you at risk for being removed fairly expeditiously."

Alix Mattingly

Gov. Matt Bevin said Monday despite praise for Kentucky’s embrace of the Affordable Care Act in recent years, the initiative has been an “abject failure” in the state.

“Kentucky, which has long been vaunted as an example of the opposite, I’m telling you as a matter of fact has been an unmitigated disaster,” Bevin said at a news conference after governors attended an event with President Trump.

Bevin has long opposed the Affordable Care Act, which made more people eligible for Medicaid in Kentucky and created a state exchange, Kynect, for people to purchase health insurance.

flickr/Creative Commons/Hakan Dahlstrom

Bowling Green and Warren County planning officials are working on a project to upgrade biking and walking routes and local residents are being asked for input.

Miranda Clements is the Greenways Multimodal Coordinator for the Metropolitan Planning Commission. She said the commission has hired the Nashville firm of RPM Transportation Consultants to help design the improvements.

“Basically, what they are wanting to do is, look at our facilities and what we have and try and understand what the needs are and then identify different opportunities to improve the biking and walking in the community.”

The consultants will use suggestions from residents in developing the plan.

Gage Skidmore/Creative Commons

Vice President Mike Pence is asking the Indiana Supreme Court to let him keep secret some documents emailed to him while he was the state's governor.

The request comes after an Indianapolis lawyer earlier this month sought the overturning of a state appeals court decision denying access to emails sent to Pence in 2014 in which a staffer for Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott outlined a legal strategy for challenging then-President Barack Obama's executive order on immigration.

The appeals court ruled the documents are privileged attorney-client communications.

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