The post office in downtown Bowling Green is close to being sold, and the public will have a chance to weigh in later this month on where the new facility will be located.

The downtown post office on East 11th Ave. is under contract, but the sale has not been finalized.  Phillip Doyle, a Postal Service real estate specialist, says three locations are under consideration for a new postal facility that will be in close proximity to the current one. 

"The existing location was placed where it would be most accessible to the greatest number of customers in the market place and that's still the case," Doyle told WKU Public Radio.

When the downtown post office closes, the delivery unit will be moved to the large Scottsville Road postal facility. 

Retail operations and P.O. Boxes will remain downtown at whichever site is approved.  Doyle declined to name the three properties ahead of a January 31 public meeting in Bowling Green. 

The meeting will take place at 6:00 p.m. at the LaGala event center downtown.  After that, a public comment period will continue for 30 days before a final decision is made.

Alcohol Sales Measures Go 2-for-3 in Kentucky Communities

9 hours ago
Creative Commons

Two western Kentucky communities have voted in favor of allowing alcohol sales, while residents in an eastern Kentucky county struck down a similar measure.

The Daily News of Bowling Green says Auburn residents voted 108-34 on Tuesday in favor of allowing alcoholic beverage sales. Adairville voters also favored allowing sales by a 168-83 margin.

The vote was closer and had a different outcome in Knott County, where WYMT-TV reports that residents voted 1,981 to 1,589 to stay dry. The county also voted to stay dry in 2012.

A new shelter that opened in Radcliff on Jan. 9 has found it’s hosting people who are experiencing a wide range of issues. Since Room In The Inn Radcliff opened its doors, 72 guests have come to spend the night. 

Theresa Humes is co-coordinator of the project. She says it’s important to remember that any one of us might end up in an unexpected crisis at some point in our lives.   

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

Gov. Matt Bevin has released the names of 10 people who will serve on the University of Louisville board of trustees.

The move comes after the legislature abolished the previous board earlier this month in an attempt to bring the school back into compliance with accreditation standards. The school’s accreditation was put on probation in December as a result of Bevin’s attempt to unilaterally overhaul the board over the summer.

In a video released along with the announcement, Bevin said the board had been used as a “political football by people who frankly do not have the university’s best interests at heart.”

Ohio County Tourism

Ground will be broken this spring in Ohio County honoring native son and Father of Bluegrass Bill Monroe. 

A May ground-breaking is planned for a 48,000 square-foot museum at Everett Park in Rosine.  Ohio County Tourism Director Jody Flener says the attraction will feature items from Monroe’s last home in Goodlettsville, Tennessee.

"We have everything from his bull horns over the top of his mantle to the radio he used to listen to, to pictures and awards," Flener told WKU Public Radio.

The project has received $300,000 in state funding, but organizers need an additional $450,000, which they hope to get through fundraising.  A January 27 bluegrass concert will be held in Hartford and donations will be accepted.

The museum is expected to open this fall and will complement the Bill Monroe homeplace that attracts visitors from around the world.

Kentucky Rep. Yarmuth Decides to Skip Trump Inauguration

Jan 17, 2017
Creative Commons

A Kentucky congressman says he won't attend President-elect Donald Trump's upcoming inauguration because he objects to Trump's recent behavior, including comments disparaging Rep. John Lewis.

Democratic Rep. John Yarmuth released a statement Monday evening announcing his decision.

Yarmuth says the Republican president-elect has denigrated the office by insulting and ridiculing "women, the disabled, immigrants, and countless others." He says thousands of constituents have contacted him about Trump's remarks, including those about Lewis.

Flickr/Creative Commons/Dimitris Kalogeropoylos

Maurice Ludwick says OxyContin used to be the drug of choice in Louisville. But that changed around 2010, when the drug was formulated to make it impossible to crush and snort.

Then came heroin.

“They’re all efforts to control the people from using, instead of dealing with the problem that they are using. These people just moved to something else,” says Ludwick, director of the Brady Center, a halfway house run by the Healing Place. “Before this it was methamphetamine and before that it was crack cocaine. The underlying issue is addiction.”

West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The billionaire Wilbur Ross is headed for Senate confirmation hearings as President-elect Donald Trump’s choice for secretary of the Department of Commerce. Ross made it to ultra-rich status in part by salvaging coal and steel assets in Appalachia and the Rust Belt. His business dealings leave a mixed legacy in the Ohio Valley region, from rescued steel mills to the site of a searing workplace disaster, and raise questions about the leadership he would bring to the president’s cabinet.

Kentucky Has Twice National Rate of Drug-Dependent Babies

Jan 16, 2017
Creative Commons

Research shows Kentucky had more than twice the national rate of drug-dependent babies in 2013.

The Courier-Journal cites a recent research letter in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. The letter says Kentucky's rate was 15.1 cases per 1,000 live births when the U.S. rate was 7.3 in 2013, the most recent comparable year.

Both were up substantially from five years earlier, and Kentucky's rate jumped another 40 percent the following year.

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet

Gov. Matt Bevin says he’s working with incoming President Donald Trump’s administration to come up with a way to bring Kentucky into compliance with stricter ID and driver’s license standards known as REAL ID.

Kentucky is one of eight states out of compliance with federal identification standards passed by Congress in 2004. The legislature approved a REAL ID bill last spring but Bevin vetoed it, citing widespread misunderstanding of the issue.

The REAL ID legislation was opposed by Tea Party groups and the ACLU of Kentucky, citing privacy concerns.

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