WFPL

Ahead of a large planned protest outside the EMW Women’s Surgical Center downtown, the Metro Council will continue debating the creation of a buffer zone that would block protesters from coming into close contact with women entering for abortions and their escorts.

Other cities such as Chicago, Portland, San Francisco and Phoenix have buffer zones, which usually include an 8-to-15-foot zone protesters are barred from entering. Three cities have bubble zones, which include several feet of space around a clinic patient, provider or escort walking patients inside.

Vanderburgh Humane Society

The city of Evansville is considering allowing potbellied pigs as pets. 

The city's Animal Control and Education Commission has reviewed a proposed ordinance that would add the pigs to the list of pets allowed with a license.

The Courier and Press reports the commission is recommending that the permit price to keep one of the pigs be set at $100. That fee is comparable to the permit required to  own six or more dogs. 

The Evansville City Council will review the proposed ordinance on June 26.

U.S. Department of Energy

Paducah, Kentucky, is home to USEC, a Department of Energy uranium enrichment facility that operated for 50 years until being decommissioned in 2013. Just across the Ohio River lies the Honeywell corporation’s Metropolis Works, the nation’s only uranium conversion plant.

Former State Sen. Bob Leeper thought it made sense to build on that existing capacity. So he introduced a bill to end the state’s decades-old moratorium on nuclear power. That was ten years ago.

“People weren't sure what they wanted to do with this bill,” Leeper said at a ceremonial signing event for a law named the Leeper Act in his honor. “They did the right thing in my opinion.”

Creative Commons

Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear will be back in court soon as the Kentucky Supreme Court weighs in on whether the governor’s attempted overhaul of the University of Louisville trustee board last summer was legal.

A trial court ruled last year that Bevin didn’t have the authority to remove members or abolish state university boards. The governor appealed the decision and the legislature passed a law giving the governor broader powers to retool university boards.

Beshear has characterized Bevin’s actions as a “power grab.”

Board OKs Tuition Increases at Most Kentucky Universities

Jun 16, 2017
Creative Commons

The average cost of a four-year degree in Kentucky will be more than $39,000 this fall after state regulators approved tuition increases at most of the state's public universities.

All but two schools asked for the maximum increase allowed by the Council on Postsecondary Education. The University of Louisville did not raise tuition, and Kentucky State University's board of trustees has not had a meeting yet to ask for an increase.

It is the second time regulators have approved tuition increases since Republican Gov. Matt Bevin cut the budgets for most public colleges and universities. Bevin said the cuts, about $40 million, were necessary to help the state cope with a multibillion-dollar public pension debt. And this year, state economists predict the state will finish the fiscal year with a $113 million shortfall.

Creative Commons

Louisville Congressman John Yarmuth is asking the federal Department of Health and Human Services for an update on Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin’s Medicaid expansion changes.

Yarmuth wrote the letter Thursday.

Last August, Bevin proposed several changes for Kentuckians on Medicaid — both those that got their insurance through the Medicaid expansion and make up to 138 percent of the poverty level, and traditional Medicaid enrollees, which includes people living in poverty.

An intense three-day manhunt that began Tuesday morning in Putnam County, Ga., ended Thursday in rural Christiana, Tenn., which is about 50 miles southeast of Nashville.

The saga began with what could have been a scene out of a movie: 33 inmates were riding on a Georgia corrections bus as they were being driven to another prison.

Pitino Outraged at NCAA Penalties, Louisville Will Appeal

Jun 15, 2017
J. Tyler Franklin

The NCAA didn't feel Louisville went far enough with its self-imposed sanctions following a sex scandal investigation, so the governing body Thursday handed down a few more.

An outraged Rick Pitino feels the NCAA went too far.

After completing its investigation of Katina Powell's allegations that she and other escorts were hired to have sex parties and strip for Louisville recruits and players, antics the NCAA described as "repugnant," it benched the Cardinals men's basketball coach for five games and imposed several other penalties.

Former Kentucky Attorney General Dave Armstrong Dies at 75

Jun 15, 2017
WFPL

Dave Armstrong, a former Kentucky attorney general whose long public career included helping guide the state's largest city and its most populous county toward a merged government, died Thursday after battling an illness. He was 75.

Armstrong, a Democrat, was a fixture in Louisville politics for years, first as a two-term Jefferson County judge-executive and then during a term as Louisville's mayor.

His death was confirmed by Mike Poole, a funeral director at Pearson Funeral Home in Louisville, which is handling arrangements.

In recent years, Armstrong had battled myasthenia gravis, a physically debilitating disease.

Bevin Is Blocking Critics On Social Media… And He’s Not The Only One

Jun 15, 2017
Jacob Ryan

Gov. Matt Bevin in recent months has turned to social media platforms to slam local media and share his political views directly with followers.

But as Bevin ramped up his criticism and online dispatches, he’s also blocked more than 500 Twitter users from following him, according to records released this week by ProPublica, a national investigative newsroom.

Bevin’s list of blocked social media users — obtained by ProPublica through a records request — includes many people who have shared their disdain for Bevin or President Donald Trump.

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Changes Coming To Our Weekend Schedule

Beginning July 1 , Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! will move to the Saturday morning 9c/10e timeslot right after Weekend Edition Saturday . Wait Wait will be followed at 10c/11e by Sound Opinions , a show that mixes music with conversations about music.

June 24's edition of The Best of Car Talk will be the final airing of the show on WKU Public Radio.

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LRS LIVE Replay: Kelsey Waldon & The Dead Broke Barons

Americana artist Kelsey Waldon and Franklin's own Dead Broke Barons were the featured artists on April 20th for Lost River Sessions LIVE! at the Capitol Arts Center in downtown Bowling Green. Both bands have appeared on the TV version of Lost River Sessions, but the live concert gave the audience a chance to see these bands in person.

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