The young man accused of plowing a car into a crowd of people protesting a white supremacist rally was fascinated with Nazism, idolized Adolf Hitler, and had been singled out by school officials in the 9th grade for his "deeply held, radical" convictions on race, a former high school teacher said Sunday.

James Alex Fields Jr. also confided that he had been diagnosed with schizophrenia when he was younger and had been prescribed an anti-psychotic medication, Derek Weimer said in an interview with The Associated Press.

Anyone who gets to see the total solar eclipse on August 21 will be lucky — and humanity is lucky to live on a planet that even has this kind of celestial event.

Mercury and Venus, after all, don't even have moons. Mars has a couple, but they're too small to completely blot out the sun. Gas giants like Jupiter do have big moons, but they don't have solid surfaces where you could stand and enjoy an eclipse.

And, even with solid land and a moon, Earth only gets its gorgeous total solar eclipses because of a cosmic coincidence.

Updated Aug. 13 at 10:50 a.m. ET

Political leaders used Twitter to respond to the violent confrontations that began Friday night in Charlottesville, Va.; continued with a "Unite the Right" rally that pitted members of the alt-right, Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazi groups against anti-racism counterprotesters on Saturday; and turned deadly when a car plowed into a group of pedestrians.

Updated Aug. 12 at 10:04 p.m. ET

Three people died and about 35 were injured in a day of violence that began with clashes at a white nationalist rally on Saturday in Charlottesville, Va., Gov. Terry McAuliffe said.

One of those killed was a 32-year-old female pedestrian who was hit by a car that plowed into marchers, authorities said. The driver of the car, James Alex Fields is being held on charges including second degree murder. Police say he's from Ohio.

Lexington Mayor Pushes to Remove Two Confederate Statues

Aug 12, 2017
Ryland Barton

The mayor of Lexington, Kentucky, says after the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, he is taking the steps to remove two Confederate-era statues from the lawn of a former courthouse.

The Lexington Herald-Leader reports that Mayor Jim Gray said in a statement Saturday he will ask the Lexington-Fayette County Urban County Council at its Tuesday work session to ask a state military commission for permission to take down the statues of John Hunt Morgan and John C. Breckinridge.

Anna Boiko-Weyrauch

A coal company run by West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice's family has sued two Kentucky regulators individually, claiming they're to blame for the company's reclamation delays that could result in $4.5 million in fines.

The Courier-Journal reports that Kentucky Fuel Corporation has sued Kentucky Department for Natural Resources Commissioner Allen Luttrell and Deputy Commissioner John Small. The Pike County Circuit Court lawsuits seek money from the regulators personally, not from the state.

J. Tyler Franklin

Adding to Kentucky’s financial woes, economists are predicting the state will bring in around $200 million less than originally projected this fiscal year.

The state’s Consensus Forecasting Group, a panel of economists that budget writers rely on to estimate how much money the state will make, predicted Kentucky will bring in a little more than $10.6 billion in revenue instead of the more than $10.8 billion initially estimated.

J. Tyler Franklin

The University of Louisville has filed its appeal of punishment handed down by the NCAA for violations committed to the men’s basketball program.

The penalties were imposed after an investigation into allegations that former staff member Andre McGee arranged stripper shows and sex parties for Cardinal players and recruits over a nearly four-year period.

Pixabay

The future of sex education for some classrooms across the country is up for debate as President Trump’s proposed 2018 budget allocates a majority of funding towards abstinence-centered programs. Abstinence education is already required in Kentucky schools, where many high school students will encounter it in their mandatory health class. There, the classroom experience can end up being very different for female students compared to their male counterparts.

Megan Durbin is a few years removed from her sex education class at Calloway County High School, but she remembers it like it was yesterday. As a freshman she and the other girls were in separate classroom as a guest lecturer passed around a rose, telling each girl to remove a petal.


Mary Meehan

Days after sending mixed signals on his response to the nation's opioid crisis, President Donald Trump said Thursday that he plans to declare a national emergency to better address the epidemic.

“We’re going to spend a lot of time, a lot of effort, and a lot of money on the opioid crisis," the president said, announcing that his administration was drafting the paperwork to make the emergency declaration official.


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LRS Replay: The Kentucky Acoustic Music Festival

The second annual Kentucky Acoustic Music Festival was held May 20th at The Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green. It was presented by Lost River Sessions. The evening featured local favorite Mt. Victor Revue, Jenni Lyn and Lillie Mae.

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