Former Fox News Chairman and CEO Roger Ailes has died, the network says, citing a statement from the late executive's family. Ailes resigned from his post leading Fox News last July, amid allegations of sexual harassment. He was 77.

Ailes helped found Fox News in 1996. On Thursday, the network initially announced his death by citing the Drudge Report, which had published a statement from Ailes' wife, Elizabeth.

The livelihoods of farmers and ranchers are intimately tied to weather and the environment. But they may not be able to depend on research conducted by the government to help them adapt to climate change if the Trump administration follows through on campaign promises to shift federal resources away from studying the climate.

Becca Schimmel

Sen. Rand Paul has once again filed a bill that would allow judges to have more discretion when imposing sentences on those convicted of federal crimes, though he says the bill will have an “uphill battle” gaining support in the White House.

“I think the key really is not the administration so much — although eventually they would weigh in on it,” Paul said during a conference call on Wednesday. “I think the key is in the Senate. This is one of the few things I think we really have good, broad bipartisan support for.”

The legislation would allow judges to impose sentences that are less severe than mandatory minimum sentences currently required by law.

Paul argues that the policy would help reduce the federal prison population and restore “proportionality, fairness, and rationality to federal sentencing.

The University of Louisville’s Conn Center for Renewable Energy is planting more hemp this year at the school’s Belknap Campus.

This is officially the center’s second hemp crop — the first was planted last August and yielded a few dozen pounds of plants. This year, there will be two different varieties of hemp growing, as well as kenaf. Kenaf is an African plant used for fiber and oils.

“Having the crops grow on campus actually raises awareness about the research that we have going on at Conn Center,” said assistant director Andrew Marsh.

The Daviess County Board of Education has approved a controversial nickel tax to fund school construction and renovation. 

The nickel tax is the equivalent of 5.7 cents per $100 of assessed property value.  By law, the school system can use the revenue only for facilities. 

Assistant Superintendent Matt Robbins says the tax will pay to renovate Apollo High School and replace the 85-year-old Daviess County Middle School.

"Daviess County Middle School is categorized as a category five facility, which means it's in the worst condition of those in the state," Robbins told WKU Public Radio.  "Apollo is just the next rung on the ladder as a category four facility. The rest of our facilities are either in a three, two, or one category, which puts it into perspective."

Becca Schimmel

Kentucky is coal country, and is heavily reliant on the dirty fossil fuel for power. A study underway at Western Kentucky University is examining the effectiveness of a water-based clean coal solution.

The coal is treated with the solution at Big Rivers power plant in Ohio County, Kentucky. WKU partnered with Big Rivers and the state’s Cabinet for Economic Development to determine if the solution reduces carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen emissions.

Researchers at WKU are taking an enzyme from a mushroom and growing it in water. That solution is then sprayed on coal as it falls down a chute. The coal then sits for a few days before it’s burned.


Flickr/Creative Commons

An Obama-era program to change how small businesses insure their employees will be majorly scaled back.

On Monday, President Donald Trump’s administration announced it would gut the Small Business Health Options Program, or SHOP.

As part of the Affordable Care Act, SHOP created an insurance marketplace for small businesses that is similar to Healthcare.gov. And while SHOP was never a very popular program that had its own troubles, it ended up spurring private insurers to make changes to the way they provide insurance to small businesses.

Martin Falbisoner/Creative Commons

None of Kentucky’s Republican senators or congressmen responded to requests for comment on allegations that President Donald Trump gave classified information to the Russian ambassador and foreign minister last week.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell briefly addressed the issue during an interview on Bloomberg TV Tuesday morning.

“I think we can do with a little less drama from the White House on a lot of things so that we can focus on our agenda,” McConnell said.

The elephant in the room whenever talking about President Trump and the Russia investigation is the big I-word — impeachment.

The word had been in the not-so-far reaches of liberal conspiracy talk since Trump was elected. There is a website with more than 976,000 signatures on a petition encouraging Congress to impeach Trump. There is even an "Impeach Donald Trump" Twitter handle.

Blankenship Asks Trump to Resist Punishing Coal Executives

May 16, 2017
Flickr/Creative Commons/Rainforest Action Network

Former Massey CEO Don Blankenship asked President Donald Trump on Tuesday to resist attempts in Congress to enhance criminal penalties for coal executives who violate mine safety and health standards.

Blankenship, who recently was freed from federal prison, also asked the president in a letter to re-examine a federal investigation into the nation's worst coal mining disaster in four decades.

Blankenship served a year in prison for a misdemeanor conviction of conspiring to violate federal mine safety standards at Massey's Upper Big Branch mine in southern West Virginia, where 29 workers died in a 2010 explosion. Jurors didn't convict him of another conspiracy and securities fraud charges that could have extended his sentence to 30 years.

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LRS LIVE Replay: Kelsey Waldon & The Dead Broke Barons

Americana artist Kelsey Waldon and Franklin's own Dead Broke Barons were the featured artists on April 20th for Lost River Sessions LIVE! at the Capitol Arts Center in downtown Bowling Green. Both bands have appeared on the TV version of Lost River Sessions, but the live concert gave the audience a chance to see these bands in person.

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