Kyle Cook and Carla Saunders are neonatal nurse practitioners at a children's hospital in Knoxville, Tenn., where they've spent decades caring for infants. In the summer of 2010, their jobs began to change.

"We had six babies in the nursery who were in withdrawal," Saunders, 51, remembers.

Conservatives are livid after President Trump appeared to have made a deal with Democrats in order to save the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program — claiming he is abandoning his base and the stringent immigration platform he campaigned on.

Bevin Floats Prospect of Appointing Attorney General

Sep 14, 2017
Alix Mattingly

Facing lawsuits from the state's top lawyer and adverse rulings from some of its judges, Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin said Thursday that lawmakers should consider a change that could give the governor more control over deciding the people assigned with enforcing and interpreting the state's laws.

Bevin has been sued four times by the Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear. Only one of those cases has been decided, with the state Supreme Court telling Bevin he broke the law when he ordered spending cuts at the state's public colleges and universities without asking the legislature for permission. The other cases are still pending, but Franklin Circuit Judge Philip Shepherd has ruled against Bevin in some cases, prompting the governor to call him a "political hack."

Lisa Autry

Some Kentucky lawmakers say drastic recommendations issued to pay down the state’s pension debt have no legislative support. 

Legislators from south central Kentucky addressed a packed room last night of public workers and retirees in Bowling Green concerned about how pension reforms will change their benefits.  Among them was Terry Eidson who retired from state government in 2006.

"Employees and retirees are feeling a little devalued and demeaned in all this, and it just doesn't sit well," Eidson told WKU Public Radio.

The Capitol Hill health care fight sure seemed dead. After Republican proposals to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, failed to pass a Republican-controlled Congress, lawmakers looked poised to move on to other topics, like a tax overhaul. But this week, proposals from both the left and the right are grabbing headlines.

Kentucky Leads Nation in Decrease of Those Without Insurance

Sep 14, 2017
Flickr/Creative Commons

Kentucky is one of the states most affected by former President Barack Obama's health care law, new data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows.

Yet it's also a state that has elected some of the law's biggest opponents.

In 2013, 14.3 percent of Kentucky's population had no health insurance. By 2016, just 5.1 percent of the population lacked coverage. That's a 64 percent decline, the largest of any state in the country according to data from the American Community Survey released this week. It's similar to data from other national polls, including the Gallup-Healthways Survey.

Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET

President Trump affirmed Thursday morning that a deal was in the works with Democrats that would protect some 800,000 DREAMers who could face deportation when DACA expires next year in exchange for "massive border controls."

It wasn't clear, however, whether a border wall would be part of an emerging pact, as Trump had seemed to suggest at one point.

Early Thursday, he told reporters: "The wall will come later, we're right now renovating large sections of wall, massive sections, making it brand new."

MSHA

Lawmakers and union leaders are raising concerns about the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration’s practices amid an increase in coal fatalities.  

West Virginia Democratic Senator Joe Manchin asked MSHA for more information after receiving what he calls “alarming” reports about how the agency is implementing its new Compliance Assistance Program.

In a September 7th letter, Manchin wrote that he’s heard of miners being denied the ability to assign a representative to accompany MSHA inspectors and that those inspectors have been instructed to leave their credentials behind before inspecting a mine.


Henderson County Schools

Henderson County Schools have begun random drug testing of some students this academic year.

The random drug testing started this month at Henderson County High School, North Middle School and South Middle School. It applies to students in athletics and other extracurricular activities at those schools. Random drug testing is also for high school students who apply for a parking permit and anyone else opted in by their parents.

Megan Mortis is a spokeswoman for Henderson County Schools. She says the drug testing is confidential, with students identified by numbers.

“We are working with a private corporation that generates a random number of participants, 10 from the high school, three from North Middle and three from South Middle, that would be randomly selected every week. It is on random days and at random times.”

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jon Fleshman

Another breakdown at an aging lock and dam has halted river traffic on the Ohio in western Kentucky. It’s the second such interruption in less than a year for a stretch of river that carries some 90 million tons of cargo annually.

“A lot of commerce does go through that section and delays cost the industry money,” Army Corps of Engineers Louisville District public affairs officer Carol Labashosky said. “That’s a very, very important, crucial spot on the Ohio River.”

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LRS Replay: The Kentucky Acoustic Music Festival

The second annual Kentucky Acoustic Music Festival was held May 20th at The Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green. It was presented by Lost River Sessions. The evening featured local favorite Mt. Victor Revue, Jenni Lyn and Lillie Mae.

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