Addiction experts are up in arms over remarks by Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price in which he referred to medication-assisted treatment for addiction as "substituting one opioid for another."

Nearly 700 researchers and practitioners sent a letter Monday communicating their criticisms to Price and urging him to "set the record straight."

Wikimedia Commons Corey Coyle

While exact statistics are unknown, it’s estimated that about 60 percent of farmworkers in the United States are undocumented immigrants. But amid growing labor shortages in large agricultural states and President Donald Trump’s promise to assemble a “deportation task force,” farmers nationwide have voiced concerns that stricter immigration laws could break the backbone of America’s agricultural economy.

For that reason, proposed legislation called the Agricultural Worker Program Act, now widely referred to as the “Blue Card Act,” has garnered a lot of national media attention of late.

Creative Commons

A liberal group has come out against President Donald Trump’s nomination of a Louisville lawyer to a federal appeals court, criticizing him for opposing a landmark ruling dealing with freedom of the press.

John Bush is currently a partner at the Louisville law firm Bingham Greenebaum Doll, and according to his website practices complex litigation dealing with financial institutions, intellectual property and product liability disputes.

He is also an influential member of the Federalist Society, a conservative group that advocates for the literal interpretation of laws and the Constitution based on their original meaning.

During a Federalist Society event in 2009, Bush said that a landmark Supreme Court ruling that strengthened press protections from libel claims was probably “wrongly decided.”

Kentucky LRC

The Secretary of Kentucky’s Justice and Public Safety Cabinet says he’s thrilled with the impact of the state’s needle exchange programs.

John Tilley believes the 32 local needle exchange efforts in Kentucky represent a change in how the state is facing the growing problems of opioid addiction, and diseases spread through the use of infected syringes.

Tilley says many of the addicts participating in needle exchanges are deciding to get help.

“They are five times—five times—more likely to enter treatment. And we’ve had great success in getting people who go to these programs into treatment, so that’s a public health win. We have to do it to battle back Hepatitis C—that’s a public health nightmare in Kentucky.”

A Warren County judge has delayed a ruling in a case between Western Kentucky University and its student newspaper.  WKU requested a stay in its lawsuit against the College Heights Herald over an open records dispute. 

The university has denied requests from the newspaper to turn over redacted documents from sexual misconduct investigations involving campus employees.  WKU argues the documents are protected under federal law and not subject to disclosure under the state’s Open Records Act.

WKU had requested its lawsuit be put on hold until the state Court of Appeals issues a ruling on a similar case from the University of Kentucky.

Mending Mining Country: Three Ways Trump Could Help Miners And Coal Communities

May 15, 2017
Alexandra Kanik

At a March ceremony to sign an executive order reversing Obama-era environmental regulations, coal miners were arranged on stage around President Donald Trump as he took up his pen.

“You know what it says, right?” Trump asked the miners. “You’re going back to work.”

From his campaign rallies to White House events, President Donald Trump has surrounded himself with coal miners and promised to restore their collapsed industry.

Mary Meehan

A new report shows Kentucky, Tennessee, and Indiana are among seven states with twice the national rate of Hepatitis C cases.

The Centers for Disease Control reported new cases of Hep C have increased nationwide by nearly 300 percent from 2010 to 2015. Hepatitis C is still associated with more deaths than 60 other diseases.

According to the Kentucky Department for Public Health, the state had the highest rate of new acute Hepatitis C infections from 2008 to 2015, with more than 1,000 cases. The CDC report said intravenous drug use is the primary risk factor for new infections.

flickr creative commons

Apple says it will give $200 million to Corning Inc. so it can invest in a Kentucky plant that makes glass screens for iPhones and iPads.

The California-based company says the money will come from its Advanced Manufacturing Fund. It has pledged to spend $1 billion on U.S.-based companies to create “innovative production and highly skilled jobs.”

Corning has had a facility in Harrodsburg for 65 years. The company has collaborated with Apple for the past 10 years by making scratch-resistant Gorilla Glass for Apple’s products.

WFPL

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul is criticizing Attorney General Jeff Sessions for directing federal prosecutors to charge defendants with the most serious crimes they can pursue.

The new guidelines are a departure from an Obama-era policy that eased prosecutions of people with non-violent drug offenses.

In 2013, then-Attorney General Eric Holder directed prosecutors to avoid charging people with crimes that carry mandatory minimum sentences, which require judges to impose lengthier prison terms.

In a statement, Paul said the reprisal of the “tough on crime” policy isn’t a good idea.

J. Tyler Franklin

Gov. Matt Bevin doesn’t want to share his thoughts on President Donald Trump’s decision to fire former FBI Director James Comey.

After a press event Friday at the Muhammad Ali Center in downtown Louisville, Bevin avoided answering questions related to national politics — including Comey’s firing and a recent directive from U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions to roll back some of his predecessors’ prosecution policies.

Bevin traveled to Louisville to make an announcement about a championship boxing match in Freedom Hall scheduled for later this year. He joined Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and former heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield for the announcement at the Ali Center.

Pages

Sustaining Members

698 of 800

Help us reach 800 sustaining members and we'll skip our June 14-16 pledge drive. Click the microphone to join!

Monday Afternoons at 4:45c/5:45e

Exploring the changing economy of Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia

Photo Galleries

Bryan Lemon/WKU

LRS LIVE Replay: Kelsey Waldon & The Dead Broke Barons

Americana artist Kelsey Waldon and Franklin's own Dead Broke Barons were the featured artists on April 20th for Lost River Sessions LIVE! at the Capitol Arts Center in downtown Bowling Green. Both bands have appeared on the TV version of Lost River Sessions, but the live concert gave the audience a chance to see these bands in person.

Read More

E-mail Newsletter