2014 General Assembly http://wkyufm.org en Those Seeking Pastoral Counseling in Kentucky Can Now Bill Insurance Companies for Services http://wkyufm.org/post/those-seeking-pastoral-counseling-kentucky-can-now-bill-insurance-companies-services <p></p><p>A new law that went into effect this week in Kentucky is changing the way the state views faith-based mental health counselors. Kentucky is now licensing such counselors, which means their services will be covered by insurance policies.</p><p>One of the faith-based counselors impacted by the new law is Joe Bob Pierce, who works with Cornerstone Counseling in Owensboro. He says the change in state law could encourage potential clients who might have been put off by having to foot the entire bill.</p><p>“Clients that otherwise might have to pay out-of-pocket to see a pastoral counselor now will be provided a bit of subsidy, or help, or in some cases their entire fee for counseling will be handled by the insurance company.”</p><p>Pierce’s counseling service is located inside Third Baptist Church in Owensboro. He says while many of his clients are deeply rooted in traditional Baptist beliefs, he has also counseled individuals who don’t claim any religious affiliation.</p><p>He says his clients are interested in receiving help from someone who will take into account the spiritual aspects of their lives,</p><p>“It may not necessarily be a dimension that is religious in terms of being attached to a particular faith. But I think it’s very much a part of our make-up as people.”</p><p>To be licensed by the state, pastoral counselors must have a master’s degree in the field and meet the same qualifications as other licensed counselors. Thu, 17 Jul 2014 16:18:12 +0000 Kevin Willis 51216 at http://wkyufm.org Those Seeking Pastoral Counseling in Kentucky Can Now Bill Insurance Companies for Services Laws Impacting Everything From Kudzu to Lobbyists Become Official This Week in Kentucky http://wkyufm.org/post/laws-impacting-everything-kudzu-lobbyists-become-official-week-kentucky <p></p><p>A bevy of new state laws passed this year by the Kentucky General Assembly is going into effect this week. The legislation ranges from dealing with invasive plant species to tougher ethics laws governing the relationship between lawmakers and lobbyists.</p><p>The state constitution stipulates that laws without an “emergency” clause go into effect 90 days after the adjournment of a legislative session. Since the last day was April 15, many new laws are going into effect this week.</p><p>Senate Bill 170 grants the state expanded powers to combat invasive plant species like kudzu, which can quickly overtake other plants by drowning them in shade.</p><p>Similarly, House Bill 28 will make it tougher for lobbyists to invade the decision-making process in Frankfort by restrict their ability to pay for a legislator’s expenses.</p><p>Other laws taking effect this week include a streamlined concealed carry permitting process for victims of domestic violence; expanded prescription-writing authority for registered nurses; leniency on lesser crimes for victims of human trafficking; and permitting by-the-drink alcohol sales at state parks, if&nbsp; nearby residents approve it. Tue, 15 Jul 2014 20:28:08 +0000 Jonathan Meador 51104 at http://wkyufm.org Laws Impacting Everything From Kudzu to Lobbyists Become Official This Week in Kentucky Gov. Beshear: Support Remains Light For Special Session http://wkyufm.org/post/gov-beshear-support-remains-light-special-session <p>It appears Kentucky lawmakers will not return to the state capital before January.&nbsp; State legislators had barely made it home in April when there was talk of a possible special session on heroin-related legislation.&nbsp; The question of state funding for Rupp Arena was also mentioned as a special session topic.&nbsp;<br /><br />Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear said Wednesday he doesn't anticipate calling general assembly members back over the next six months.</p><p>"I think that most legislators have concluded that they really are ready to wait until January in order to address any unfinished business," said Beshear.&nbsp; "There's always unfinished business when you come out of a session and I just don't find any sentiment for a special session from a vast majority of the house or senate members."</p><p>Meantime, reflecting on the just-completed primary election, the Democratic governor says he remains confident the Kentucky House will keep its Democratic majority in the fall. That advantage currently stands at 54 to<br /><br />"We have some great candidates that are not gonna get ready for the fall.&nbsp; I feel good about the probability that we'll be able to maintain control of the House and perhaps even add a couple of seats to that majority, so I'm looking forward to November," said Beshear.<br /> Wed, 21 May 2014 23:33:04 +0000 Stu Johnson | Kentucky Public Radio 48420 at http://wkyufm.org Gov. Beshear: Support Remains Light For Special Session Governor Beshear: Special Session Not Likely http://wkyufm.org/post/governor-beshear-special-session-not-likely <p>Democratic Governor Steve Beshear said Wednesday he likely would not call the legislature back for a special session to pass bills combating heroin use and overhauling state ethics laws.</p><p>Beshear told reporters he would only call the legislature back in session if Republican and Democratic leaders agreed to pass certain legislation. The governor said he did not sense an overwhelming desire for a special session after speaking with leaders from both parties.</p><p>Republican Senate President Robert Stivers has asked Beshear for a special session to pass the heroin bill.</p><p>Democratic House Speaker Greg Stumbo has asked the governor for a special session to pass ethics reform following the Legislative Ethics Commission's decision to not punish a state lawmaker accused of sexual harassment. Wed, 30 Apr 2014 18:11:57 +0000 Associated Press 47365 at http://wkyufm.org Governor Beshear: Special Session Not Likely Beshear Signs $4.1 Billion Road Plan http://wkyufm.org/post/beshear-signs-41-billion-road-plan <p>Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear has signed into law a $4.1 billion road construction plan that does not include a gas tax increase.<br /><br />Beshear had proposed raising the gas tax 1.5 cents per gallon. The increase would have brought in an extra $107 million to pay for road projects across the state. House Democrats approved the increase, but Senate Republicans blocked it.<br /><br />Highlights of the road plan include $35 million for a new interchange on I-75 next to a Toyota factory, $28.7 million to continue planning the replacement of the Brent Spence Bridge in Covington and $123 million over two years to continue widening the Mountain Parkway in eastern Kentucky.<br /> Fri, 25 Apr 2014 22:15:11 +0000 Associated Press 47170 at http://wkyufm.org Beshear Signs $4.1 Billion Road Plan 2014 General Assembly Session in Review: Who Won? Who Lost? http://wkyufm.org/post/2014-general-assembly-session-review-who-won-who-lost <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">By law, the only piece of legislation that the 2014&nbsp; Kentucky General Assembly had to pass was a two-year state budget.</span></p><p>All else, as Will Rogers put it, is applesauce.</p><p>And with a session that began with a bang and ended with a whimper, it's what happened in between that House Speaker Greg Stumbo says lawmakers should be "proud" of.</p><p>Specifically, that they passed a compromised version of Gov. Steve Beshear's $20.3 billion state budget. House Minority Floor Leader Jeff Hoover, however, took to the editorial page of The Courier-Journal to vent about what he dubbed a "lackluster" session.</p><p>But the truth probably lies somewhere between the extremes of "proud" and "lackluster."</p><p>Many political observers noted a reluctance among lawmakers to tackle controversial measures—chief among them tax reform—because of the impending November elections that will prove as a test for House Democrats to retain their slim eight-seat majority.</p><p>Here's a look at the winners, losers and downright lost causes of the 2014 General Assembly.</p><p><strong>WINNERS</strong></p><p>The coal industry—A slate of coal-friendly bills easily cleared the legislature, including one that allows coal-fired power plants in the state to regulate their own carbon emission standards at lower-than-federal-levels. Lawmakers also approved a bill that provides a new round of tax incentives for coal and coal-related industries to subsidize their purchase of new equipment.<br /> Sat, 19 Apr 2014 22:40:55 +0000 Jonathan Meador 46848 at http://wkyufm.org 2014 General Assembly Session in Review: Who Won? Who Lost? After Late Night, Lawmakers Wrap Up Legislative Session http://wkyufm.org/post/after-late-night-lawmakers-wrap-legislative-session <p><span style="font-family: 'Segoe UI', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;">This year's Kentucky legislative session is now over. Though many bills failed due to lack of compromise or attention, House Speaker Greg </span>Stumbo<span style="font-family: 'Segoe UI', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;"> says lawmakers did what was expected of them from taxpayers by passing a two-year state budget.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: 'Segoe UI', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;">But that chamber’s highest ranking Republican, Jeff Hoover, decried tactics by Democrats to amend bills at the last minute without giving Republicans enough time to study them. Lawmakers debated new amendments and legislative procedure right until the stroke of midnight.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: 'Segoe UI', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;">Among the failed bills was a measure that would raise penalties for heroin traffickers and legislation that would restore voting rights for felons.</span></p><div style="font-family: 'Segoe UI', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;"> Wed, 16 Apr 2014 13:13:45 +0000 Jonathan Meador 46667 at http://wkyufm.org After Late Night, Lawmakers Wrap Up Legislative Session Lawmakers Reach Deal To Fund Roads and Bridges Projects http://wkyufm.org/post/lawmakers-reach-deal-fund-roads-and-bridges-projects <p><em><strong>Update 5:38 p.m.</strong></em><br /><br />House and Senate lawmakers have agreed to a $4.1 billion road spending plan on the Legislature's final day that, if approved, would avoid an expensive special session.<br /><br />The plan includes $5.2 billion worth of projects throughout the state. But as much as 25 percent of that money will not be spent. Lawmakers said they like to include a cushion in case some projects are delayed because of environmental concerns or problems acquiring land.<br /><br />The state Senate is scheduled to vote on the road plan first before sending it to the House of Representatives. Lawmakers have until midnight to pass the bill.&nbsp;</p><p><em><strong>Original Post:</strong></em><br /><br />State lawmakers say they are close to an agreement on how to spend $1.2 billion in state tax dollars on road construction.<br /> Tue, 15 Apr 2014 22:38:41 +0000 Associated Press 46621 at http://wkyufm.org Lawmakers Reach Deal To Fund Roads and Bridges Projects Conservative Group Says Kentucky Could Repeal Death Penalty Within 5 Years http://wkyufm.org/post/conservative-group-says-kentucky-could-repeal-death-penalty-within-5-years <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">A national conservative group says the effort to get rid of the death penalty in Kentucky is picking up substantial bipartisan support.&nbsp; But legislation to repeal capital punishment failed to gain much traction in this year’s legislative session.</span></p><p><br />In the House, a bill to ban the death penalty was introduced by Republican David Floyd of Bardstown; in the Senate, Democrat Gerald Neal did the same. But neither piece of legislation received a hearing. &nbsp;<br /><br />Marc Hyden with the group “Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty”, says while progress may be slow, he says within five years, the death penalty could be gone in Kentucky.&nbsp; He says it’s a rare issue on which Republicans and Democrats can work together.<br /><br />Hayden rejects the notion that the death penalty is a deterrent.<br /> Mon, 07 Apr 2014 11:26:37 +0000 WKU Public Radio News 46133 at http://wkyufm.org Conservative Group Says Kentucky Could Repeal Death Penalty Within 5 Years Money for Rupp Renovation Included in Kentucky Budget Approved by Lawmakers http://wkyufm.org/post/money-rupp-renovation-included-kentucky-budget-approved-lawmakers <p></p><p>The budget Kenutcky lawmakers approved this week will give $1.5 million to a costly renovation of the University of Kentucky’s Rupp Arena.</p><p>The money would be used to finance architects' and engineering fees and other planning costs for the $310 million project.</p><p>Republican lawmakers got few answers from Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, who lobbied House and Senate leadership for $65 million for the project during marathon budget talks held in Frankfort over the weekend.</p><p>Gray said the project would create thousands of jobs in Lexington, and failing to provide the amount would “drive a stake through the heart of the project.”</p><p>Details of the project remain scarce, as Gray and other officials are under a verbal non-disclosure agreement with the university. Thu, 03 Apr 2014 13:01:30 +0000 Jonathan Meador 46071 at http://wkyufm.org Money for Rupp Renovation Included in Kentucky Budget Approved by Lawmakers