News

Wikimedia Commons

Women from across Kentucky are heading to Washington, D.C., to participate in the Women’s March On Washington, scheduled for Saturday, the day after Donald Trump is inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States.

Lauren North, a co-organizer of a group of about 1,000 Kentuckians headed to the march, said she’s attending to present the concerns of women, minorities and the LGBTQ community to the new administration, which she says doesn’t have their best interests in mind.

Creative Commons

The Appalachian Regional Commission has approved a $100,000 grant for Operation UNITE to continue fighting drug abuse in southern and eastern Kentucky.

U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers says the funding will help expand the organization's impact. The Kentucky Republican says Operation UNITE's approach to curb addiction has become a national model. Rogers helped launch UNITE in 2003.

The competitive grant includes $50,000 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration is moving forward with a plan that would alter the state’s expanded Medicaid system, even if the Affordable Care Act is repealed or replaced by Congress.

The proposal has been billed as a way to get Medicaid recipients more involved in their healthcare choices and also a way to reduce Medicaid costs for the state. Bevin’s administration expects about 86,000 fewer people would be enrolled in Medicaid if the waiver is approved.

Vickie Yates Brown Glisson, secretary of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, said on Wednesday that the state would still move forward with the plan, even if Congress moves to fully repeal the Affordable Care Act.

Kentucky Granted REAL ID Extension Through June 6

Jan 20, 2017
Kentucky Transportation Cabinet

Kentuckians can use their drivers’ licenses to enter certain federal buildings until at least June 6 after the U.S. government granted the state more time to comply with a federal law.

Federal agencies, including military bases, were slated to stop accepting Kentucky drivers’ licenses by the end of this month because the state has not complied with the federal REAL ID Act of 2005. But the U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced Thursday it had granted the state an extension through June 6.

Jacob Dick

While thousands of Americans will be in Washington, D.C. to celebrate the Inauguration of President-Elect Donald Trump, thousands of others are expected to take part in the Women’s March on Washington on Jan. 21 in protest of what they see as Trump’s discriminatory views of many minority groups. Regional rallies in support of the Women’s March are being held across the nation.

Patricia Minter is an associate professor of history at Western Kentucky University. She says that shapes her perspective on why the local marches are so important.

Carrie Neumayer for KyCIR

The threats started on September 7, exactly one day after a grand jury indicted her alleged rapist.

The messages were dark, continuous and clear: she could die for testifying against wealthy, politically connected Daviess County farmer and businessman Billy Joe Miles.

She received a Facebook message with a photo of her attached, calling her a liar. It was from one of Miles’ employees, according to court records. Later, she found threats scrawled on the windows — “last warning, no cops, you will die.”

Miles’ accuser was driving alone down the highway when a hammer hurled from a passing vehicle shattered her windshield. She replaced it. Someone carved “lying bitch” into the paint. She left the words there.

Beshear to Announce Research Project for Rape Kit Backlog

Jan 19, 2017
Ryland Barton

Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear is teaming up with the University of Louisville for a research project involving the state's rape kit backlog.

Beshear is scheduled to announce the project on Thursday along with Bradley Campbell, an assistant professor at UofL's Department of Criminal Justice.

A 2015 audit revealed Kentucky had more than 3,000 untested rape kits, collections of physical evidence from victims after a sexual assault. Police check that evidence against a national database of DNA profiles to look for suspects.

WKU

The Western Kentucky University Board of Regents has selected its “preferred candidate” to be the school’s next president.

Timothy Caboni is currently the vice-chancellor for public affairs at the University of Kansas, and holds a master’s degree in corporate and organizational communications from WKU.

The New Orleans native is scheduled to be on WKU’s campus next Thursday to participate in forums with the school’s staff, faculty, students, and community members.

The post office in downtown Bowling Green is close to being sold, and the public will have a chance to weigh in later this month on where the new facility will be located.

The downtown post office on East 11th Ave. is under contract, but the sale has not been finalized.  Phillip Doyle, a Postal Service real estate specialist, says three locations are under consideration for a new postal facility that will be in close proximity to the current one. 

"The existing location was placed where it would be most accessible to the greatest number of customers in the market place and that's still the case," Doyle told WKU Public Radio.

Alcohol Sales Measures Go 2-for-3 in Kentucky Communities

Jan 18, 2017
Creative Commons

Two western Kentucky communities have voted in favor of allowing alcohol sales, while residents in an eastern Kentucky county struck down a similar measure.

The Daily News of Bowling Green says Auburn residents voted 108-34 on Tuesday in favor of allowing alcoholic beverage sales. Adairville voters also favored allowing sales by a 168-83 margin.

The vote was closer and had a different outcome in Knott County, where WYMT-TV reports that residents voted 1,981 to 1,589 to stay dry. The county also voted to stay dry in 2012.

A new shelter that opened in Radcliff on Jan. 9 has found it’s hosting people who are experiencing a wide range of issues. Since Room In The Inn Radcliff opened its doors, 72 guests have come to spend the night. 

Theresa Humes is co-coordinator of the project. She says it’s important to remember that any one of us might end up in an unexpected crisis at some point in our lives.   

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

Gov. Matt Bevin has released the names of 10 people who will serve on the University of Louisville board of trustees.

The move comes after the legislature abolished the previous board earlier this month in an attempt to bring the school back into compliance with accreditation standards. The school’s accreditation was put on probation in December as a result of Bevin’s attempt to unilaterally overhaul the board over the summer.

In a video released along with the announcement, Bevin said the board had been used as a “political football by people who frankly do not have the university’s best interests at heart.”

Ohio County Tourism

Ground will be broken this spring in Ohio County honoring native son and Father of Bluegrass Bill Monroe. 

A May ground-breaking is planned for a 48,000 square-foot museum at Everett Park in Rosine.  Ohio County Tourism Director Jody Flener says the attraction will feature items from Monroe’s last home in Goodlettsville, Tennessee.

"We have everything from his bull horns over the top of his mantle to the radio he used to listen to, to pictures and awards," Flener told WKU Public Radio.

Kentucky Rep. Yarmuth Decides to Skip Trump Inauguration

Jan 17, 2017
Creative Commons

A Kentucky congressman says he won't attend President-elect Donald Trump's upcoming inauguration because he objects to Trump's recent behavior, including comments disparaging Rep. John Lewis.

Democratic Rep. John Yarmuth released a statement Monday evening announcing his decision.

Yarmuth says the Republican president-elect has denigrated the office by insulting and ridiculing "women, the disabled, immigrants, and countless others." He says thousands of constituents have contacted him about Trump's remarks, including those about Lewis.

Flickr/Creative Commons/Dimitris Kalogeropoylos

Maurice Ludwick says OxyContin used to be the drug of choice in Louisville. But that changed around 2010, when the drug was formulated to make it impossible to crush and snort.

Then came heroin.

“They’re all efforts to control the people from using, instead of dealing with the problem that they are using. These people just moved to something else,” says Ludwick, director of the Brady Center, a halfway house run by the Healing Place. “Before this it was methamphetamine and before that it was crack cocaine. The underlying issue is addiction.”

Pages