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NPR

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A coordinated sniper attack in Dallas killed five police officers Thursday, in a bout of violence that didn’t end until the last of at least two snipers who had fired on police died in a parking garage. Police say at least four people were involved in the attack and that they have three suspects in custody.

In addition to the five officers who were slain, seven were wounded in the shooting that began just before 9 p.m. local time, at the end of a downtown protest march that was held to condemn two police killings of black men in other cities earlier this week.

Two civilians were also wounded in the attack, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said Friday morning. He refused to give details about suspects in the case, citing the active investigation.

State police have arrested a woman for the murder of a Smiths Grove woman last month.

After a stand-off with police at a Rockfield home, Mary Thompson was arrested for the shooting death of 51 year old Dealynn O’Connor in Smiths Grove June 17th  .

A news release from State Police says they learned Wednesday that Thompson was in the home in Rockfield. She was arrested after 7:00 Thursday night.

Lost River Sessions

Episode 5 of Lost River Sessions on radio features Nashville band Forlorn Strangers and Paducah's Red Ember. 

Forlorn Strangers has a new album due out in August.  Their performance was recorded at the Warehouse at Mt. Victor in Bowling Green.  Red Ember's set was recorded at the Phoenix Theater in downtown Bowling Green. 

Jim Gray Says He Raised $1.1 Million in Second Quarter

Jul 7, 2016
Office of Lexington Mayor

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Jim Gray says he has raised nearly $1.1 million for his U.S. Senate campaign in the second quarter.

The Lexington mayor said in a news release his campaign raised $1,083,039 for the fundraising period ending June 30. The campaign did not say how much money it spent during that time. A spokeswoman for Gray declined to say how much money the campaign has available to spend.

Gray reported $1.8 million in his first fundraising report earlier this year, but $1 million of that was his own money. Gray said he did not contribute to his campaign in the second quarter.

Gray is challenging Republican U.S. Sen. Rand Paul. Paul, who unsuccessfully ran for president, has not released his fundraising totals yet. The deadline to file fundraising reports is July 15.

Flickr/Creative Commons

Despite a flurry of attention after last month’s mass shooting in Orlando, Congress won’t likely pass gun control legislation before members leave for summer break, which starts next week and lasts until September.

On Thursday, Republican leaders in the House of Representatives indefinitely postponed a vote on the most likely contender — an NRA-supported bill that would have created a review of gun sales to those on the FBI terrorist watch list.

The bill is identical to legislation proposed by Sen. John Cornyn, a Texas Republican and Majority Whip; it creates a 72-hour window in which federal officials could deny purchases for those on the list.

U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie, a Republican from Garrison, said in an emailed statement that although House leadership could bring it back, he’s “glad the bill is dead.”

“This bill was unconstitutional, did not effectively counter terrorism, and rewarded Democrats for disrupting regular order in the House,” Massie said. “Also, the gun control language of the legislation had already failed in the Senate and was clearly dead on arrival in the House.”

WKU Athletics Media Relations

Four former Western Kentucky University athletes are being inducted into the Kentucky High School Basketball Hall of Fame in Elizabethtown.

Dwight Smith, Jim Rose, Gene Rhodes, and Harry Todd are part of the Hall’s fifth class of inductees.

Smith and Rose are being honored posthumously.

Smith is a Princeton native who led Dotson High School to the state tournament in 1963. He went on to score 1,142 career points at WKU, while averaging 11 rebounds a game.

Rose led Hazard High School to three straight Sweet 16 appearances in from 1964-66, and was named all-state in his final three high school seasons. He finished 34th on the all-time WKU scoring list, and was a key member of the school's 1971 Final Four team.

NPR

The battle to control the Republican National Convention in Cleveland — and the fate of the party — has reached a turning point.

While the “Stop Trump” movement has unleashed a barrage of cross-country phone calls and emails to seek support for its proposals, a group of longtime Republican rule-makers, some working with the Donald Trump campaign, has quickly coalesced to try to block them.

Those Republican rule-makers are also going on offense by proposing what would be relatively historic changes to take some power away from convention delegates this year and close more primaries to non-Republicans the next time around.

Rick Howlett, WFPL

After years of planning, fundraising and a legal battle with the state, the Ark Encounter theme park opens to the public Thursday near Williamstown, in Northern Kentucky.

The park — which features a full-scale model of Noah’s Ark — was dedicated earlier this week in a ceremony that included the blowing of the shofar, or ram’s horn. Some 7,000 donors got an early look at the ark, a literal interpretation of the story of Noah’s Ark told in the Old Testament of the Bible.

It was built by the Christian group Answers in Genesis, which also operates the Creation Museum not far away in Petersburg.

The official opening marks a moment of jubilation for the group’s founder, Ken Ham, and the park’s creators. But opponents aren’t staying silent.

Rob Canning

Gov. Matt Bevin is taking requests to remove state regulations, which he says prevent businesses from relocating to Kentucky.

Bevin’s office has set up a website, RedTapeReduction.com where people can “report a reg” and describe how the policy is “hurting you/your business.”

In a video announcing the initiative, Bevin said removing regulations will make Kentucky more attractive to businesses looking to relocate.

“If they’re going to leave somewhere else we want them to exit to Kentucky. One of the things that would prevent that from happening is the amount of regulation,” he said, standing next to a sign that says “Exit To Kentucky.”

Bevin estimated that there are 4,500 regulations in Kentucky.

Ryland Barton

The Kentucky attorney general's office says a county clerk who went to jail for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples has violated the state's Open Records Act.

In an opinion Tuesday, the attorney general's office said Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis violated the act by refusing to produce documents related to the gay marriage battle.

The Lexington Herald-Leader said the nonprofit Campaign for Accountability requested records between Davis and her attorneys, Liberty Counsel, on March 1.

Liberty Counsel refused, saying the documents are preliminary and private.

The Open Records Act provides for costs and attorney's fees to be awarded in some cases as well as up to $25 per day for each day the person is denied access to the record. Liberty Counsel can appeal the opinion.

Rick Howlett

A Noah’s Ark attraction built by the group Answers in Genesis is ready to open in northern Kentucky. The group held an open house for media and donors Tuesday at the $100 million park near Williamstown, Kentucky.

The long-awaited Ark Encounter theme park is based on the Old Testament story. The centerpiece is a 510-foot wooden ark, filled with exhibits based on descriptions in the Bible.

Its construction has rankled opponents who say the attraction will be detrimental to science education. They’ve also criticized the group’s faith-based hiring practices, which were at the core of a legal battle over tax rebates awarded, then withdrawn by the state.

That case was won by Answers in Genesis. Founder Ken Ham says a federal judge rightly ruled that religious preference in hiring is legal.

Creative Commons

Kentucky lawmakers on Friday will hear the “pros and cons” of legalizing marijuana for medical purposes.

It’s the first hearing in which representatives from both sides of the issue will present their arguments to the interim Licensing, Occupations and Administrative Regulations Committee.

State legislators have long been hesitant about throwing support behind the issue despite an apparent increase in popular support.

Jaime Montalvo, founder of Kentuckians for Medicinal Marijuana, says “behind closed doors” many lawmakers support the issue, but don’t want to openly champion the cause.

“They do not want to be the one that pushes for it,” Montalvo says. “They don’t want to support it publicly, they would rather it pass without them having to do anything about it.”

Flickr/Creative Commons/Eric Molina

The leader of Bowling Green-based health group says a needle exchange for intravenous drug users is the best way to fight the state’s addiction problems.

Dennis Chaney, director of the Barren River District Health Department, is applauding the Bowling Green city commission’s decision Tuesday to approve a needle exchange program.

The exchange must now be approved by Warren County Fiscal Court. It has already been authorized by the Warren County Board of Health.

Chaney said he understands those who feel a needle exchange will enable drug users.

But he thinks it’s the best way to break down barriers and start the healing process.

“The opportunity is for those folks who would participate in the program, the responsibility is for us to try to develop a relationship with those folks just like what you may have and you may enjoy with your primary care physician,” Chaney said.

Logan County sheriff Wallace Whittaker was briefly hospitalized Sunday following a car accident.

Russellville police handled the wreck at 431 South and the entrance to The Greens housing complex.

They say a car driven by Dustin Craig of Russellville hit the side of Whittaker’s car as the sheriff was turning into a driveway. Whittaker complained of shoulder and head pain and was taken to Logan Memorial hospital for observation.

Both vehicles sustained damage and sheriff Whittaker’s Buick Enclave had to be towed from the scene.

Benny Becker | Ohio Valley ReSource

Kentucky is working on a multimillion-dollar plan to bring broadband internet to the eastern part of the state, home to some of the country’s most impoverished places. A federal report released this year found that from around a third to nearly half of rural residents in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia lack high-speed internet and the job opportunities that come with it. But a few areas are ahead of the curve. In Kentucky’s Jackson and Owsley Counties, broadband has already arrived and is already creating jobs.

With a population of 1,095, Annville, Kentucky is one of the bigger towns in Jackson County. It’s surrounded by grassy fields and rolling hills, which are the inspiration for the county’s tourism slogan: “Where the Mountains and the Bluegrass Blend.

It’s not easy to find a job in Jackson County. More than a quarter of the population lives below the poverty line. Most people who have jobs work outside the county. For Annville resident Alisha Tanfield, those long costly commutes made it hard to make ends meet. “After you pay gas, you’re not making anything,” she said.

If you’re barely getting by and your livelihood depends on a long commute, car troubles can create a major crisis. When Tanfield’s car broke down she lost what income she had and found herself struggling to provide for her two daughters. Then Tanfield heard about a friend who had found a work-from-home job through the Teleworks USA job board. Tanfield says she’d always been curious about work-from-home jobs but hadn’t tried applying for any because she thought a lot of them are scams.

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