News

The Louisville-based Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) will recognize same-sex marriage for all of its congregations.

The top Presbyterian legislative body endorsed the new wording last year, but amending the church’s constitution required approval from the majority of regional bodies, called presbyteries. That majority was reached Tuesday with a favorable vote by New Jersey’s Presbytery of the Palisades, according to the Associated Press.

The denomination will expand its definition of marriage in the church constitution to say that marriage is a “commitment between two people.”

The Mid-Kentucky Presbytery, made up of more than 50 congregations, voted earlier this month in favor of the change. As WFPL reported, not everyone is expected to be happy about the decision.

Rev. Dr. Peggy Hinds, associate general presbyter for the Mid-Kentucky Presbytery, said at the time: “We have a lot of congregations who, this will upset them if this passes. We have other congregations wondering why it’s taken this long.”

Flickr/Creative Commons/Aaron Vowels

A week after announcing the receipt of $6.3 million from the foundations of businessmen “Papa” John Schnatter and Charles Koch, the University of Louisville has released the underlying seven-year agreements.

The two documents affirm that the new John H. Schnatter Center for Free Enterprise will be created by Dec. 1. It also states that the money will be spent on two tenure-track professorships, two visiting professors, center staff and expenses, up to five research grants, up to four doctoral fellowships, and classes, seminars and annual lectures.

KFC Yum! Center

Fans heading to the KFC Yum Center in Louisville for NCAA basketball games are being urged to get their early.

Melting snow and heavy rain has caused flooding in areas around the Waterfront.

Yum Center director of marketing Sandra Moran says the parking garages under the arena and at the Galt House are open for business.

She says if fans aren’t parking there they should try to avoid I-64’s Third Street ramp because of congestion.

“Have a plan and look at a couple of different garages that you might try to park at because there will be limited space during the day with the business traffic that’s going to be downtown as well," urged Moran.

Four games are scheduled for Thursday, including the University of Kentucky’s opener against Hampton.

Abbey Oldham / WKU Public Radio

An all-day speaker series in Bowling Green this week is dedicated to encouraging participants to make their innovative ideas a reality.

IdeaFestival Bowling Green is being held this Friday at the Downing Student Union Auditorium on WKU’s campus.  The school’s Innovate Kentucky Executive Administrator, Josh Raymer, says some of the topics discussed at this year’s event will include cancer research, branding and imaging, and making online content more social.

“And what we love is that these speakers all come from Kentucky, or neighboring states. So it truly is an example for everyone that these big ideas that you see in New York, or Los Angeles, or Chicago—they’re also happening right here in Kentucky.”

Another topic that will be addressed by several speakers is the future of the automotive industry.

“A lot of Corvette tie-ins, which is appropriate, given that it’s IdeaFestival Bowling Green,” said Raymer. “But once again, that’s about how important it is to stay on the cutting edge of innovation, especially in a hyper-competitive field like the automotive industry.”

The Bowling Green event is an off-shoot of the IdeaFestival held in Louisville each fall since 2000.

More information about this year’s IdeaFestival Bowling Green can be found here.

Boone County has become the first county in northern Kentucky to pass a local right-to-work law. 

The fiscal court voted unanimously Tuesday night to join ten other Kentucky counties in approving the controversial measures, which prohibit mandatory union membership as a condition of employment. 

Meanwhile, Oldham County government has voted to table its right-to-work ordinance until a federal lawsuit is resolved.  A group of labor unions has a suit pending against Hardin County for passing a similar ordinance. 

Flickr/Creative Commons

Nissan Motor Co. is building a new $160 million supplier park at its Tennessee assembly plant in Smyrna that the Japanese automaker says will lead to the creation of more than 1,000 jobs.

Nissan North America Chairman Jose Munoz on Tuesday called the supplier park a key component in the company's drive toward capturing 10 percent of the U.S. market share.

Nissan's plans call for the new 1.5 million-square-foot logistics center to be built in phases starting next year and completed by the end of 2017.

More than 8,400 people work at the Nissan plant that built 648,000 vehicles last year, making it the highest-producing plant in North America. The plant, which opened in 1983, makes the Altima, Maxima, Leaf, Rogue, Pathfinder and Infiniti QX60.

Sen. Rand Paul's advisers are preparing to launch a White House bid on April 7.

A senior Paul adviser said Tuesday the Kentucky Republican is set to make his presidential ambitions official in Louisville, Kentucky. He then is expected to visit early nominating states such as Iowa and New Hampshire.

The adviser demanded anonymity to speak ahead of Paul's public announcement. The adviser adds that Paul could still pull the plug on a campaign, although that is not expected to happen.

Paul's team has booked an event at Louisville's Galt House hotel. His supporters have also received invitations to that site.

Details of the kick-off event were first reported by The Lexington Herald-Leader.

Jonathan Meador, Kentucky Public Radio

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer says he want to “run up the score” in western Kentucky, where he leads a four-person Republican field for governor.

“As Commissioner of Agriculture, I’ve worked very closely with a lot of entrepreneurs and family farmers in Western Kentucky so they know me, they know I can provide the badly needed leadership we need in this state," said Comer. 

Last week’s Bluegrass Poll found Comer was trailing former Louisville Metro Councilman Hal Heiner by eight points statewide.  Comer has a double digit lead over his party opponents in western Kentucky. 

He says he’s the best-equipped candidate to take on presumptive Democratic nominee Jack Conway in the November general election, noting that he outpolled the state attorney general in the 2011 elections for their respective offices.

Kentucky has joined a multi-state and federal fraud lawsuit against Cincinnati-based Omnicare Inc., alleging that the company billed the state’s Medicaid program almost $6 million over nine years for drugs that were given to nursing home patients for uses not approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

According to papers filed by Attorney General Jack Conway in federal court in Abingdon, Va., Omnicare received “millions of dollars” in kickbacks from Abbott Laboratories for promoting the use of Depakote, an anti-seizure and mood-disorder drug, for dementia patients who were agitated or aggressive. The suit says Omnicare defrauded state Medicaid programs by billing for the illegally administered drugs.

The complaint is Conway’s third kickback case against Omnicare, which moved its headquarters from Covington in 2012. Omnicare spokesman Patrick Lee did not return a phone call Monday.

The company paid $98 million in 2009 to settle claims it took kickbacks from drug makers Johnson & Johnson and IVAX. It paid $8.2 million in 2014 to settle claims it paid kickbacks to nursing homes in return for their pharmacy business.

Abbott Labs settled the Virginia case by paying a $1.5 billion settlement in 2012, about $3 million of which went to Kentucky. Another institutional pharmacy operator named in the case, Louisville-based PharMerica, has agreed to settle out of court for an unspecified amount.

City of Owensboro

A new emergency alert system could be coming to Daviess County. 

The smartphone app Ping4 would allow emergency officials to send out messages to people in a specific area during outdoor events like concerts or fireworks shows. 

Daviess County Deputy Emergency Management Director John Clouse says the alerts could be anything from severe weather to a missing child.

"We have several different festivals and things going on down at Smothers Park and on Second Street," notes Clouse.  "This would give us the opportunity should a missing child come up to alert everyone in that area and give a general description of what the child was wearing and where they were last seen."

Any smartphone would receive the alerts without the owner downloading the app. 

Clouse says the system was tested last year at the music festival ROMP and went well.  He adds the system could be operational in days once the Daviess County Fiscal Court approves a contract with the app manufacturer.

Pages