World
5:10 am
Sun November 20, 2011

New U.S. Strategy On Afghanistan Hinges On Pakistan

Pakistani protesters shout slogans during a protest in Multan on Oct. 14 against U.S. drone attacks in Pakistani tribal areas. Officials said U.S. drone strikes on Oct. 13 killed 10 militants, including a senior commander in the Haqqani network. Drone attacks are one way the U.S. hopes to squeeze the Haqqani militants.
AFP/Getty Images

As the drawdown of American combat troops in Afghanistan nears, the U.S. is facing an increasingly dangerous opponent. The Pakistan-based Haqqani network, allied with the Taliban, is believed to be behind a recent string of deadly attacks in Afghanistan, and it's forcing the U.S. to rethink an earlier strategy for stabilizing the country.

But the strategy hinges on help and cooperation from Pakistan — which is never a sure thing.

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Business
5:09 am
Sun November 20, 2011

Border-Town Factories Give Manufacturers An Edge

Employees of TECMA, a cross-border plant or maquiladora, work in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Business leaders say the quick delivery time of goods from Mexico to the U.S. can help revive manufacturing in North America.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 12:51 pm

Officials in the United States have been wringing their hands lately over how to revitalize domestic manufacturing and keep factories from moving overseas.

But not all of those plants are going across the ocean to China or India or some other low-cost production hub in Asia. Many are relocating just south of the border to Mexico, prompting business leaders to argue that the U.S.-Mexico border region may be the key to rejuvenating manufacturing in North America.

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Science
4:15 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

Arson Forensics Sets Old Fire Myths Ablaze

A fire burns in a scale model of a living room in the ATF's Fire Research Lab in Beltsville, Maryland. Until the development of the FRL, there were no fire measurement facilities in the U.S., or anywhere, dedicated to the specific needs of the fire investigation community.
Courtesy of the ATF

Originally published on Sat November 19, 2011 9:27 pm

In 1990, a fire broke out in a house in Jacksonville, Fla., killing two women and four children. The husband of one of the women became the prime suspect, and that's when a fire investigator named John Lentini was called in.

At the time, Lentini says, the initial evidence pointed to a fire that was deliberately set. He calculated that it would have taken about 20 minutes for the house to become engulfed in flames — what's called a flashover — leaving plenty of time for someone to set the fire and get out.

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Sports
2:00 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

Saving Lives, One Sports Injury At A Time

The number of student athlete injuries has decreased greatly since the early 1970s thanks to the work and recommendations of Fred Mueller, longtime director of the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research. Mueller's ground breaking changes in high school pole vaulting and swim competitions have saved lives. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host host Laura Sullivan speaks with Fred Mueller about his latest area of concern: Cheerleading.

Law
2:00 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

Fighting The Pseudonym Cyberwar

The Department of Justice plans to tighten current laws regarding websites' terms of service conditions. That means if you press that "Agree" button on websites, you better mean it. Some say broadening the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act could even make using a pseudonym on social media outlets a felony. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host host Laura Sullivan talks with Orin Kerr, a professor at George Washington University Law School, about how the government can strengthen the Internet's defenses against cyber warfare while keeping the law reasonable.

The Salt
12:24 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

Dirty Ovens: Built-In Seasoning Or Grimy Mess?

That puddle of grease is unlikely to be a source of tasty flavors for your next meal, experts say.
iStockphoto.com

With some types of cookware, the more you use it, the better flavor it lends to food.

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Around the Nation
7:21 am
Sat November 19, 2011

Children Of Cuba Remember Their Flight To America

At Miami's airport, children from Cuba meet George Guarch, who worked for the Catholic Welfare Bureau in the city. Guarch took displaced children to temporary camps in Miami.
Operation Pedro Pan Group

Operation Pedro Pan shaped the lives of a generation of Cuban-Americans. Between 1960 and 1962, the program airlifted more than 14,000 Cuban children from Havana to the U.S. Fifty years later, those children are recalling how that flight changed their lives.

In Miami this weekend, a group of Cuban-Americans — now in their 50s and 60s — are gathering to commemorate the flights that took them from their homeland to America.

The journey began in early January 1959, after Dictator Fulgencio Batista fled the country. Fidel Castro arrived in Havana soon after and took control.

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Sports
7:00 am
Sat November 19, 2011

Sports Losses Devastate, Scandals Persist

Originally published on Sat November 19, 2011 3:37 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

WERTHEIMER: An upset in college football, Iowa State upset number two-ranked Oklahoma State in double overtime. That's a major shuffle for the BCS. And the NBA appears to have reached a stalemate. But some say NBA owners and players may have another go at reaching an agreement.

Joining us from member station WFCR in Amherst, Massachusetts is Howard Bryant, senior writer for ESPN.com and ESPN The Magazine.

Thank you for joining us, Howard.

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Around the Nation
7:00 am
Sat November 19, 2011

Park Re-Opening Gives NOLA A Reason To Celebrate

Originally published on Sat November 19, 2011 3:37 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Not that people in New Orleans ever a really need a reason to celebrate, but yesterday was one of those days.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

TREME BRASS BAND: (Playing)

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Politics
7:00 am
Sat November 19, 2011

Supercommittee Deal Prospects Appear To Fade

The bipartisan supercommittee enters the final weekend prior to its Nov. 23 deadline with little tangible progress to show for over two months of work. NPR's Andrea Seabrook tells guest host Linda Wertheimer that several of its members are huddling in Washington this weekend, trying to come up with a way to reduce the government's budget deficit.

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