National Security
8:42 am
Mon November 21, 2011

The American Behind The 2008 Attack On Mumbai

In this courtroom drawing, David Coleman Headley is shown facing a federal judge.
Carol Renaud AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 2:38 pm

American David Coleman Headley was one of the leading planners of the 2008 terrorist attacks in Mumbai, which killed 166 people over three days at two five-star hotels, a train station and a small Jewish community center.

Headley, the son of a Pakistani father and an American mother, had been chosen for the mission because he looked like a non-Muslim Westerner. He used those looks — and his U.S. passport — to plan logistics for several of the places attacked in Mumbai.

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The Two-Way
8:15 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Top Stories: No Debt Deal Likely; Suspect Arrested In Alleged NYC Bomb Plot

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 8:23 am

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The Two-Way
7:50 am
Mon November 21, 2011

UC Davis Pepper-Spraying: Police Chief Put On Leave, Chancellor To Speak

In this image made from video, a police officer uses pepper spray as he walks down a line of Occupy demonstrators sitting on the ground at the University of California, Davis on Friday, Nov. 18, 2011.
Thomas K. Fowler AP

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 8:56 am

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The Two-Way
7:08 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Seattle Mariners Outfielder Halman Stabbed To Death, Brother Arrested

"Dutch police say Seattle Mariners outfielder Greg Halman has been stabbed to death and his brother has been arrested as a suspect," The Associated Press reports from Rotterdam. He died earlier today.

Halman, 24, is Dutch-born. In the past two years with the Mariners, he appeared in 44 games — hitting at a .207 average, with two home runs and nine runs batted in.

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The Two-Way
6:45 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Death Toll Rising In Cairo After Crackdown In Tahrir Square

An Egyptian protester prepares to hurl a tear gas canister back at security forces as others run for cover earlier today in Cairo's Tahrir Square.
Mohammed Hossam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 7:26 am

The death toll from three days of clashes in Cairo's Tahrir Square has risen to at least 24, a morgue official tells The Associated Press. (Note at 8:25 a.m. ET: Earlier, the official told the AP that the toll was 35; now, he says 11 of the deaths were unrelated to the violence.)

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The Two-Way
6:15 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Superfailure Looks Likely; Then What?

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 6:28 am

The headlines this morning all say pretty much the same thing:

-- "Deficit Effort Nears Collapse." (The Wall Street Journal)

-- "Debt Supercommittee Members Brace For Failure." (The Washington Post)

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Africa
4:33 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Cairo Racked By Deadly Violence For A Third Day

A protester in Cairo's Tahrir Square prepared to hurl a tear gas canister at Egyptian security forces as others ran for cover Monday.
Mohammed Hossam AFP/Getty Images

Thousands of protesters clashed with police Monday in Cairo in a spasm of violence that has lasted for three straight days and left dozens of people dead – the worst since the popular uprising that toppled Egypt's government.

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Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

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In this position, which he has held since late 2010, Glinton has tackled big stories including GM's road back to profitability and Toyota's continuing struggles. Glinton has traveled throughout the Midwest covering important stories such as the tornado in Joplin, Missouri, and the 2012 presidential race. He has also covered the U.S. Senate and House for NPR.

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Among other things, Knox's NPR reports have examined the impact of HIV/AIDS in Africa, North America, and the Caribbean; anthrax terrorism; smallpox and other bioterrorism preparedness issues; the rising cost of medical care; early detection of lung cancer; community caregiving; music and the brain; and the SARS epidemic.

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