Regional
3:04 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Bowling Green Runner Expects 'Immensely Emotional' Return to Boston

WKU instructor Cort Basham returns to Boston this month for another Boston Marathon
Abbey Oldham/WKU Public Radio

Cort Basham of Bowling Green reflects on last year's Boston Marathon and looks ahead to this year's race

A year ago Tuesday, Cort Basham had just finished his third Boston Marathon and was looking for a place to eat with his mother, who was also on the trip, when he heard an explosion.

“My mind immediately went to the worst, but even someone standing next to us said ‘that sounds like dynamite on a job site’.  But it was within seconds that the second one happened,” Basham told WKU Public Radio’s Kevin Willis just days after last year’s race. 

“Just seconds later, people start pouring around the corner from Boylston – again we were one block from Boylston. Then you knew, even though we didn’t have line-of-sight, that something terrible was happening and we just tried to move away as quickly as we could,” said Basham.

Three spectators died as a result of the bombings; hundreds were injured.

Basham and his mother were uninjured.  As he prepares to return to Boston, we caught up with Basham, a WKU instructor,  to ask him about his training for this year’s race and inquire about what he expects the atmosphere to be like for the marathon.

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Politics
11:32 am
Mon April 14, 2014

Women Accusing Arnold of Sexual Harrassment Ask Commission to Reconsider Ethics Ruling

Former Union County Rep. John Arnold
Credit Jonathan Meador, Kentucky Public Radio

Update 12:49 p.m.
(From Associated Press report) One dissenting vote last week spared former State Rep. John Arnold from any disciplinary action stemming from multiple sexual harassment allegations against him. Now, lawmakers have taken action to try to prevent that from happening again.  

 The House voted Monday to change the rules for the ethics committee to require commission members to attend at least half of the meetings every year. The rules changes also gave the committee jurisdiction over former lawmakers.  The one commission member who voted not to punish Arnold last week says he did so because he felt the commission didn’t have the power to punish lawmakers who’d already resigned. 

Original Post

Two women who made formal sexual harassment complaints against former state Rep. John Arnold have filed a motion with the Kentucky Legislative Ethics Commission asking it to reconsider its ruling that cleared Arnold of ethics charges.

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Regional
6:56 am
Mon April 14, 2014

Kentucky Executive Appointed to Hunger Commission

A Bowling Green business executive has been appointed to serve on the National Commission on Hunger. Spencer A. Coates was selected by Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell. Coates is president of Houchens Industries, a diversified employee-owned company with roots in retail grocery and convenience stores.

The Commission is made up of ten people selected by Congressional leaders. The Commission will make recommendations to Congress and the Secretary of Agriculture on how to modernize and improve federal food assistance programs.

McConnell says Coates is a great fit for the new commission. He says Coates has front-line experience dealing with how and where people use food assistance programs.

Coates also serves on the Board of Directors of the National Grocers' Associations.

Environment
6:42 am
Mon April 14, 2014

Pipeline Would Pass Through Hundreds of Waterways

U.S Army Corps of Engineers documents show that a planned pipeline project in Kentucky would affect more than 750 rivers, streams, wetlands and ponds during construction. The proposed Bluegrass Pipeline would carry natural gas liquids through more than a dozen Kentucky counties on the way to the Gulf of Mexico.

The Courier-Journal obtained a wetlands destruction permit submitted to the Corps of Engineers in December by the pipeline builders. The permit says the construction would require digging trenches through most of the waterways or drilling underneath others, as well as maintaining a 50-foot cleared right of way.

Opponents of the pipeline say construction would do lasting damage to the waterways.

The permit has since been withdrawn and the pipeline's builders have pushed back a proposed construction completion date to the end of 2016.

Arts & Culture
7:03 pm
Sun April 13, 2014

Owensboro Native, Elizabethtown Resident Continues Making Waves in Opera World

Owensboro native Anthony Clark Evans is one of five nationwide winners of the prestigious Sarah Tucker Study Grant
Credit Anthony Clark Evans

The rise to prominence in the opera world continues for an Owensboro native.

Last week, Anthony Clark Evans was named a winner of the Sarah Tucker Study Grant from the Richard Tucker Music foundation. Evans is one of only five young opera singers nationwide to win the $5,000 award this year. The audition for the grant was by invitation only.

“What it really means to me, is that I’m able to maybe make a few extra trips here and there and audition for more people because I’ll have a little bit of extra cash just sitting in the bank,” said Evans.  “I’ll be able to maybe take a flight out to New York again to sing for somebody that’s important out there.”

The  28-year-old baritone now resides in Elizabethtown but is currently studying at the Ryan Center of Lyric Opera in Chicago. He says he comes from a long line of singers.

“It really comes from my father. He was a trained singer and his father was a trained singer. I think it goes back four or five generations,” said Evans.

He studied voice at Murray State, but left school twice to save up more money to continue his education. The second time away, he got married and the couple settled in Elizabethtown where he took a job at a car dealership. 

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Regional
4:14 pm
Sun April 13, 2014

Corvette Sinkhole Recovery Enters Next Phase

Construction Manager Mike Murphy stands in front of the 40x50 foot sinkhole that opened beneath the National Corvette Museum February 12.
Credit National Corvette Museum

Now that all of the cars are out, work begins this week toward repairing the sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green. 

Communications Director Katie Frassinelli says a team will meet Tuesday to discuss how to repair the Skydome, which was the site of the February sinkhole collapse.

"We've had fans on Facebook or people who have emailed with suggestions from putting in a glass floor, leaving the hole, and making it as good as new," comments Frassinelli.

Frassinelli says what happens to the Skydome will also come down to price. 

Engineering studies revealed that the area around the sinkhole was solid enough to allow restoration of the Skydome, which is scheduled to be completed by August, in time for the museum's 20th Anniversary celebration.

Spring Membership Campaign
7:10 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Thank You for Your Amazing Support of WKU Public Radio!

Saturday is the final day of our spring membership campaign!
Credit Abbey Oldham

Thanks to our amazing supporters, WKU Public Radio wrapped up our spring membership campaign Saturday night with over $49,000 in support pledged to the station!

We are truly humbled by the generosity of our listeners, and we can't thank our members enough for their great show of support not only this week, but throughout the entire year.

What happened this week is a reminder of the important role WKU Public Radio plays in the lives of our listeners.

There's still work to be done before the end of the fiscal year. If you've received a renewal letter in the mail recently, please respond soon. If you didn't have the chance to pledge your support to WKU Public Radio during our spring campaign, you can always donate online.

From everybody here at WKU Public Radio, thank you for everything you do to make this non-commercial public station possible!

Politics
10:43 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Tennessee Lawmakers Look To Wrap Up Session Early Next Week

Now that lawmakers have passed an annual spending plan -- the lone major piece of legislation the state constitution requires them to approve each year -- they are hoping to wrap up the 108th General Assembly as early as Tuesday.

Both chambers on Thursday approved their versions of the state budget after rebuffing attempts by both Democrats and some Republicans to restore raises that had been planned for teachers and state employees.

Among the major items remaining this year are Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam's limited voucher program and his effort to limit the sale of cold and allergy medicines used to make meth.

House members are also still deciding whether they want to return in May to consider overrides of any vetoes by Haslam.

Regional
10:15 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Pitino, Ex-Teammate Sought Mercy For Farmer

Richie Farmer

University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino asked a federal judge to show mercy when sentencing ex-Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer and allow him to "become a productive citizen again" after the basketball star's fall from grace.

Pitino's letter is among 29 dispatches sent to U.S. District Judge Gregory Van Tatenhove before Farmer's sentencing in January for abusing public office. Farmer is serving a 27 month sentence.

Van Tatenhove unsealed the letters Thursday evening.

Among the family and friends writing letters was former Kentucky basketball star and current University of Florida assistant coach John Pelphrey. Pitino coached both men at Kentucky from 1989 through 1992.

Farmer and Pelphrey were part of a Wildcats team that earned the school its first postseason trip after a two-year ban for NCAA infractions.

Politics
5:19 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Kentucky Governor Signs Cannabis Bill

Doctors at two university research hospitals can now prescribe oil derived from marijuana or hemp to treat patients.

Gov. Steve Beshear signed SB.124 into law on Thursday. It allows doctors at the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville research hospitals to prescribe cannabidiol to treat patients. Supporters note the oil has been particularly effective in treating seizures in children.

In a news release, Beshear said he signed the bill into law because it only allowed the oil with the permission from a doctor at a research hospital or if someone is participating in a trial administered by the federal Food and Drug Administration.

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