Associated Press

International Bluegrass Music Center

The International Bluegrass Music Museum and Hall of Fame is about to break ground on a new $15 million facility in Owensboro next week.

City leaders including Owensboro Mayor Ron Payne and Daviess County Judge executive Al Mattingly are attending the June 23 event at 311 West 2nd Street.

The property takes up an entire block in a revitalized section of downtown. It will have a 450-seat concert hall, recording studio, an outdoor concert area, gift shop and a rooftop restaurant. Museum officials say it will house "the world's foremost collection" of bluegrass artifacts, memorabilia and music recordings.

Peyronnin Construction of Evansville, Indiana, is building the museum. It is expected to be finished in 2018.

U.S. Army

Army ROTC is celebrating its 100th anniversary this week with a ceremony at Fort Knox.

The post said senior leaders from across the nation, members of the U.S. Army Cadet Command and people from the community will take part.

The former commander of Africa Command, retired Gen. Carter F. Ham, will be the keynote speaker during the event Friday. The post said in a news release that the Golden Knights Parachute Team will conduct a demonstration, and the command will induct over 300 people into the Army ROTC Hall of Fame.

Ethan Miller/Getty Images for Keep Memory Alive

The president of Turkey and king of Jordan joined the long line of world leaders, religious figures and superstars set to speak at Muhammad Ali's funeral Friday.

Ali family spokesman Bob Gunnell announced funeral details at a news conference Monday.

California imam and scholar Zaid Shakir will preside over the service at the KFC Yum! Center in Louisville.

Speaking at the funeral will be representatives of multiple faiths, including Islam, Judaism, Christianity, Buddhism, Mormonism and Catholicism. They will be followed by Ali's wife, Lonnie Ali; daughter Maryum Ali; actor Billy Crystal; sportscaster Bryant Gumbel; Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and King Abdullah II of Jordan.

President Bill Clinton will deliver a eulogy.

Flickr/Creative Commons/Douglas McCoy

About 60 animals have been rescued from a western Kentucky animal shelter where authorities say they were being underfed and not given enough water.

Kim Carroll, 50, of Bee Springs in Edmonson County, was charged Friday with second-degree animal cruelty following the discovery of dozens of malnourished animals, as well as one dead dog and three dead cats. Several other animals have since been euthanized.

Owensboro Humane Society member Cheryl Bartlett says she alerted deputies after one of her children discovered a dead dog in an outdoor kennel.

The Edmonson shelter had taken in animals via contracts with governments of Edmonson, Hart, Grayson and Metcalfe counties.

It's unclear whether Carroll has an attorney.

Relatives say a Blue Angels pilot who died when his jet crashed near Nashville had wanted to fly since he was a child.

A U.S. official identified the pilot killed Thursday as Marine Capt. Jeff Kuss. The official wasn't authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Dolph Kuss says his grandson dreamed of being an aviator since a young age. And Kuss' mother, Janet Kuss, said in a 2014 newspaper interview that her son had "wanted to be a Blue Angel since forever."

It was the second fighter jet crash of the day for the military's elite fighter jet performance teams. A member of the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds crashed in Colorado after a flyover for the Air Force Academy graduation where President Barack Obama spoke. That pilot ejected safely.

Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear has appointed a special prosecutor to handle the case against his former deputy.

Former Deputy Attorney General Tim Longmeyer pleaded guilty to a federal bribery charge last month. Last week, Beshear announced he would file state charges against Longmeyer. At first, Beshear said he would prosecute the case himself. But Thursday he said he would hand the case to Franklin County Commonwealth's Attorney Larry Cleveland.

Cleveland said the attorney general's office asked him to take the case on Wednesday, citing a conflict of interest.

Longmeyer pleaded guilty to using his influence as the state Personnel Cabinet secretary to steer contracts to a public relations firm in exchange for kickbacks. He also directed some of that money to Beshear's 2015 campaign for attorney general.

Two billboard companies have refused to display an advertisement by an atheist group to protest the Ark Encounter amusement park in northern Kentucky.

Tri-State Freethinkers president Jim Helton says the group recently raised $10,000 for a billboard. The proposed design depicts Noah's Ark with people drowning around it and the words, "Genocide and Incest Park: Celebrating 2,000 years of myths."

The advertisement has been turned down by billboard companies Lamar and Event Advertising and Promotions LLC.

Helton says the group is considering erecting the billboard outside of Kentucky, if it can find a taker.

The Ark Encounter, a 510-foot wooden ship as described in the Old Testament, is under construction. It's a product of Answers in Genesis, which also owns the Creation Museum.

In March, Answers in Genesis President Ken Ham called the billboard campaign an attack on Christianity.

Funtown Mountain Facebook

A south-central Kentucky country music radio station owner has bought a closed recreational park in Cave City.

The Courier-Journal said David Froggett Jr. purchased the two tracts of land and buildings for $295,000 at auction Wednesday.

Froggett, of Edmonton, owns WHSX-FM. He told the Daily News of Bowling Green last week that he plans to turn the attraction into a "resort park-nature park combination."

The park started as the Western-themed Guntown Mountain in 1969. It was purchased in May by a Louisville businessman who planned to turn it into a Kentucky-themed park, but he was unable to follow through due to health issues.

Dana Corp. employees in Glasgow have learned the plant will close by mid-2017.

The Glasgow Daily Times reports the company plans to reduce employment by half by the end of the year. The plant employs 203 people and produces gear sets, shafts and secondary gearing components for commercial vehicles.

Dana Holding Corp. spokesman Mark Burd said the reason for the closure is deterioration of the commercial vehicle market.

A notice filed with the state on Tuesday said Dana will let 191 employees go as a result of the plant closure. Burd said the facility employs 186 hourly workers and 17 salaried workers, though some are currently laid off.

Burd said employees will be eligible for severance pay, and some may relocate to other Dana facilities.

The plant was built in 1972. Dana acquired it in 1998.

The Kentucky Supreme Court has thrown out evidence gathered during a traffic stop, ruling that a man who was sentenced to 20 years in prison on drug trafficking and other charges had been improperly detained.

The Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer  reports 50-year-old Thomas J. Davis was sentenced to 20 years in prison in 2014 after having been pulled over by McLean County Sheriff's Deputy Tim McCoy, who stopped him in 2010 on suspicion of driving under the influence. McCoy says after Davis failed field sobriety tests, a K-9 sniffed the vehicle, detecting drugs. McCoy found methamphetamine inside the vehicle.

The Supreme Court justices ruled Davis had been lawfully stopped but there had been no valid reasons to conduct the drug searches. The justices ordered a new case hearing to be conducted.

Kentucky News Network

Communities across Kentucky and  Tennesseeare reeling from the news that two young natives were among those killed in the terrorist attacks in Brussels last week.

Stephanie and Justin Shults were confirmed dead Saturday, ending their families' agonizing international search for the young couple living abroad.

Vanderbilt University, where the couple met while attending the Owen Graduate School of Management, issued a statement that said the "bright young couple chose, in the spirit of discovery, to become global citizens in order to grow, to learn and to broaden their perspective."

"They represented the very best of Vanderbilt and Owen," the University wrote.

President Barack Obama called their parents to share a similar message, that the couple epitomized all that is great about America.

Justin Shults was originally from Gatlinburg,  Tennessee, and his wife, Stephanie, was a native of Lexington, Kentucky.

J. Tyler Franklin

The Kentucky House of Representatives has officially rejected the state Senate's budget proposal and appointed a conference committee to work out a compromise.

The Democratic majority of the state House did not concur with the Senate's changes to the more than $65 billion two-year state spending plan. House Speaker Greg Stumbo appointed six Democrats and three Republicans to the conference committee. Senate President Robert Stivers appointed six Republicans and four Democrats to the committee.

The key difference between the two sides is the $650 million in proposed spending cuts from Republican Gov. Matt Bevin. Senate Republicans mostly support the cuts while House Democrats mostly oppose them.

The committee met Thursday night and is scheduled to meet again on Friday. Leaders from both parties say they hope to have a compromise by Wednesday.

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services

The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services has launched a new website, Benefind, for Assistance Programs.

Media outlets report that the service launched Wednesday. Benefind can be used to apply for Medicaid, the Kentucky Children's Health Insurance Program and Kentucky Transitional Assistance Program. Those applying for SNAP and KTAP are required to complete an interview with the Department of Community Based Services to receive assistance.

Residents can also use the website to renew benefits, check benefit amounts, report changes, upload verification documents, check claim status, make claim payments and receive electronic notices.

Benefind replaces Kynect, the state health insurance exchange, as the portal to enroll in some of the state's assistance programs. Gov. Matt Bevin has plans to dismantle Kynect by the end of the year.

Tennessee voters are heading to the polls to make their choices in the state's Super Tuesday presidential primary.

The primary comes after several days of spirited campaigning around the state by all five candidates seeking the Republican nomination and by one of the two Democrats remaining in the race.

Sixty-seven delegates are up from grabs in the Democratic primary, while 58 Republican delegates will be split up among any candidates that reach a threshold of 20 percent of the vote.

While Tennessee Republicans have given the nod to religious conservatives in the last two presidential primaries, Donald Trump has drawn huge crowds and widespread support in this year's campaign.

Republican Gov. Bill Haslam and Sen. Lamar Alexander have endorsed Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.

International Bluegrass Music Museum

Organizers of the International Bluegrass Music Museum's annual concert fundraiser say Old Crow Medicine Show, Lee Ann Womack and Marty Stuart have been added to the show's lineup.

The annual ROMP Festival will be held at Owensboro's Yellow Creek Park in June. It's the festival's 13th year.

Other additions to the lineup include Billy Strings, a reunion of Louisville-based group, 23 String Band, and Nashville bluegrass band, Sheriff Scott & the Deputies.

The Del McCoury Band, Sam Bush Band and Steep Canyon Rangers are already signed up to play at the event.