Associated Press

An assistant county attorney who previously received a reprimand for deriding Korean-Americans as "foreigners" has been suspended without pay.

Multiple news sources report Jefferson County prosecutor Karl Price was suspended Thursday after a review of arraignments in April and May. In arrangement court, Price was documented making fun of crime victims, women, immigrants, disabled people, and even African Americans, even though Price himself is black.

Jefferson County attorney Mike O'Connell recently reprimanded Price for a letter he sent to a Korean family concerning a contract dispute with Hwang's Martial Arts Academy. On Tuesday, O'Connell had ordered that Price undergo sensitivity training.

Lexington health officials have unveiled a preliminary plan for a needle-exchange program to be launched in the city.

The Lexington-Fayette County Board of Health announced Wednesday it plans to offer intravenous drug users clean needles at the health department building on Newtown Pike.

A state law passed in March allows state health departments and local governments to create needle-exchange programs to stem Kentucky's growing rates of hepatitis and HIV.

Health commissioner Dr. Rice Leach says the preliminary plan is being reviewed by law enforcement, treatment centers and city officials. The officials will hold a June 19 meeting to discuss the program.

According to the plan, people seeking needles would enter the building through a back door to protect privacy. Users would be able to receive needles anonymously.

Several post-Sept. 11 anti-terror provisions have lapsed after the Senate failed to extend them before the deadline at midnight.

GOP Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, who is running for president, took credit for the outcome as he used Senate rules to slow action.

The expiration may be only temporary. The Senate now looks ready to accept a House-passed bill that extends the measures and remakes the National Security Agency's controversial bulk phone collections program.

Fort Campbell

For one day next week, the training at Fort Campbell will include preparing for a weather emergency.

The Army post along the Kentucky-Tennessee border says a weather-related emergency response exercise is set for June 2. Fort Campbell says it is partnering with off-post emergency services to practice how the post would respond to a real-life tornado touchdown.

Fort Campbell officials say such full-scale exercises are done every year and are used to evaluate the post's ability to respond to extreme emergency situations. In past years the focus has been on anti-terrorism and active shooter scenarios. This year, the focus has shifted to a tornado touchdown.

No other candidates have requested a review of Kentucky's primary election results.

Tuesday was the last day candidates could ask the secretary of state to review the voting machines and absentee ballots in all of Kentucky's 120 counties. A competitive Republican primary yielded two such challenges, one for governor and the other for agriculture commissioner.

Matt Bevin leads James Comer by 83 votes in a race for the Republican nomination for governor that was too close to call on election night. Comer has not conceded and asked for a review the next day.

Kevin Willis

Kentucky Republicans waiting to see U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell put his arm around his political nemesis Matt Bevin will have to wait a little longer.

Bevin canceled an appearance at the Elizabethtown Rotary Club on Tuesday where McConnell, the Senate majority leader, was the scheduled speaker. And McConnell has said he will not attend the state Republican Party's Lincoln Day dinner on Saturday when Bevin will be the featured speaker.

The absences seem to highlight a tense relationship between the state's senior senator and its likely Republican nominee for governor one year after McConnell defeated Bevin in the Senate primary.

A spokesman for Bevin said a scheduling conflict forced him to change his schedule. McConnell said he has to return to Washington on Saturday to prepare for a rare Sunday session to vote on the Patriot Act. Mitch McConnell says he expects to maintain but not grow the U.S. Senate's Republican majority next year.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's administration is offering more than 2,000 state workers to apply for buyouts.

Letters detailing the offers were sent out last week, but weren't expected to reach the affected workers until Tuesday because of the Memorial Day holiday.

A spokeswoman for the Tennessee Department of Human Resources said details about the packages and a breakdown of how many buyouts are being sought by the state agency wouldn't be available until sometime Tuesday.

The deadline to apply for the buyouts is July 17.

Haslam has sought more flexibility in the rules of employment for state workers since coming into office in 2011.

But lawmakers pushed back at his most recent proposal to do away with longevity bonuses, and instead only approved the change for new hires.

Kentucky LRC

State Sen. Whitney Westerfield has won the Republican nomination for Kentucky attorney general.

Westerfield defeated Lawrence County Attorney Michael Hogan in Tuesday's primary election.

The Hopkinsville lawmaker will face Andy Beshear, the son of Gov. Steve Beshear, in the November election for the job as Kentucky's chief law enforcement officer. Beshear was unopposed in the Democratic primary.

Westerfield is a former assistant commonwealth's attorney. He touts his chairmanship of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Westerfield says he helped shape high-profile legislation to combat heroin addiction, revamp the state's juvenile justice system and allow victims of abusive dating relationships to seek emergency protective orders.

A new report says Kentucky and other states could do a better job of placing children in the foster care system with families instead of group care.

The Kids Count report, released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation and Kentucky Youth Advocates, says 18 percent of the 7,211 children put into foster care in 2013 in Kentucky were placed in group settings. The data showed 81 percent were placed in family settings. The report says 30 states do a better job of finding family placements for foster children.

Kentucky Youth Advocates said progress has been made over the last year in placements. In addition, the state has begun to offer more in-home services and has changed how children are assessed when they come into the foster care system.

Republican Gov. Bill Haslam has signed a bill into law creating a mandatory waiting period before getting an abortion in Tennessee.

Under the new law signed Monday, women would need to wait at least 48 hours before undergoing the procedure. The House approved the measure on a 79-18 vote, while the Senate passed its version 24-2.

The governor previously signed into law another bill that requires facilities or physician offices to be licensed as ambulatory surgical treatment centers if they perform more than 50 abortions in a year.

The legislation came after voters in November approved a constitutional amendment giving state lawmakers more power to regulate abortions. The ballot measure overturned a 2000 Supreme Court ruling that had thrown out laws imposing similar restrictions.

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