Associated Press

NKU

The Board of Regents at Northern Kentucky University have voted unanimously to make Geoffrey Mearns the next President at NKU. Mearns, who is currently the Provost and  Senior Vice-President of Academic Affairs at Cleveland State, previously worked as Dean and Professor of Law at Cleveland State's Cleveland-Marshall College of Law.

The Tennessee House has approved a measure that would make it a felony to sell or manufacture synthetic drugs. The products, which are often called bath salts, imitate controlled substances. The issue has drawn increasing attention in recent months in several states.

A former University of Louisville track star won the Boston Marathon Monday. Wesley Korir won in a heat-slowed time of 2 hours, 12 minutes, 40 seconds. It was the second-slowest Boston race since 1985, as temperatures rising into the 80s slowed the leaders and may have convinced as many as 4,300 entrants to sit this one out.

Kevin Costner will be at Fort Knox this weekend for the unveiling of a memorial honoring soldiers under the 11th Aviation Command and subordinate units. The Elizabethtown News-Enterprise  says Costner will speak at the memorial Saturday morning and will dedicate a song, "The Angels Came Down," that he wrote in honor of those who have lost family members in war.

The Kentucky Senate Thursday afternoon approved an ambitious road construction plan that will next head to the House for final passage. The package includes $3.5 billion worth of construction projects over the next two years. The Senate voted 37-0 in favor of the measure.

A Fort Campbell soldier credited with saving the lives of two fellow soldiers during an attack in Afghanistan while wounded has been presented with the nation's second highest military honor. Sgt. Felipe Pereira of the 101st Airborne Division was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross by Gen. Ray Odierno, Army chief of staff, during a ceremony Thursday at the installation on the Tennessee-Kentucky state line.

The Amish are now exempt from a longstanding requirement that they attach orange signs to their horse-drawn buggies.  Governor Steve Beshear signed a bill into law Wednesday that allows the Amish to use white or silver reflective tape on their buggies rather than the traditional slow-moving-vehicle emblems that they rejected to on religious grounds. 

Rick Santorum says he is "suspending" his presidential campaign. At a news conference this afternoon in Gettysburg, the former Pennsylvania Senator said his White House run "is over for me." Today's move all but ensures Mitt Romney will become the GOP contender against President Obama this fall. NPR will have details about Santorum's move and the fallout in upcoming newscasts, and during All Things Considered, from 3-6pm central time.

Low humidity and windy conditions are creating a critical fire danger in some parts of the Commonwealth today. The National Weather Service has issued a red flag warning for an area that includes the cities of Owensboro, Madisonville, and Hopkinsville until 7pm.

The Associated Press reports funeral services will be held this week for a U.S. Army soldier from Dixon, who was killed recently in Afghanistan.  Rudy-Rowland Funeral Home Director Jerel Schneider says Spc. David W. Taylor will be buried in the Roselawn Memorial Gardens in Henderson on Tuesday.

Governor Mitch Daniels has built a national image as a fiscal manager with an eye for detail, but two massive accounting errors that have tilted Indiana's books by more than half-a-billion dollars threaten to tarnish that reputation as the Republican governor prepares to leave office.

A University of Kentucky student from Elizabethtown has been charged with arson, after an overturned car caught fire last week. Authorities say the vehicle was set ablaze in the wake of the Wildcat basketball team's victory over Louisville.

The Associated Press is reporting that Rockcastle County voters have rejected  a packaged liquore proposal, by nearly a 2 to 1 margin. According to WYMT-TV in Hazard, the issue drew a strong voter turnout.

WKU Public Radio/Dan Modlin

Tobacco companies will be required to report the levels of dangerous chemicals found in chew, cigarettes, and other products under the latest rules designed to tighten regulation of the tobacco industry.  The Associated Press reports that preliminary guidance issued by the Food and Drug Administration marks the first time tobacco firms will be required to report quantities of 20 chemicals associated with lung disease, cancer, and other health problems. 

The Kentucky Senate has approved a two year, $19 billion state budget that includes sharp cuts to most goverment programs and agencies. The plan was approved this afternoon, by a vote of 36 to 1 and will now go the the House of Representatives for consideration.

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