Chad Lampe

Chad Lampe, a Poplar Bluff, Missouri native, was raised on radio. He credits his father, a broadcast engineer, for his technical knowledge, and his mother for the gift of gab. At ten years old he broke all bonds of the FCC and built his own one watt pirate radio station. His childhood afternoons were spent playing music and interviewing classmates for all his friends to hear. At fourteen he began working for the local radio stations, until he graduated high school. He earned an undergraduate degree in Psychology at Murray State, and a Masters Degree in Mass Communication. In November, 2011, Chad was named Assistant Station Manager.

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2010

1st Place - Best Hard News - Ice Storm Overview

1st Place - Best Continuing Coverage - Ice Storm (staff)

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2009

2nd Place - Best Public Affairs - TV Goes Digital

2nd Place - Best Special Series - Fueling the Purchase (staff)

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2008

Second Place Best Hard News Feature

Honorable Mention Best Light News Feature

Honorable Mention Best Use of Sound

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2007

Honorable Mention Best Public Service

Honorable Mention Best Hard News Feature

Second Place Best Use of Sound

Kentucky Public Radio Student Awards 2007

First Place Best Hard News Feature

Second Place Best Public Service

Politics
8:04 am
Thu July 31, 2014

From Flashbulb to Flashpoint the Attempts to Curb Fancy Farm Shout-Fests

Shouting crowd member during Fancy Farm 2013

Originally published on Wed July 30, 2014 5:25 pm

Organizers expect a larger than usual crowd at this weekend's Fancy Farm Picnic in Graves County. The 134 year-old event has evolved from old-timey political stump speeches to a shout-fest as spectators try to overpower the speaker.

In 1975 the Fancy Farm Picnic was a little more refined. In fact, it was quiet enough to hear a flash bulb pop during then-Presidential Candidate George Wallace’s speech. Wallace survived an assassination attempt in 1972 that left him paralyzed below the waist.

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Health
5:22 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

With Mine Safety in the News, Kentucky Office Dealing with Big Budget Reduction

The Kentucky office responsible for mine safety is facing big budget cuts.
Credit flickr

As concerns rise about mine safety following an explosion in a Turkish coal mine that killed more than 200, Kentucky mine safety officials are coping with a 38 percent budget cut.

The state Office of Mine Safety and Licensing’s Dick Brown says $8.5 million in cuts will lead to eliminating some 50 positions across the state and cutting annual mine safety inspections from six to four.

The cuts also mean less safety training for miners.

“We’re going to have to be judicious in how we approach this and make sure, number one, that miners are as safe as we can possibly make them and that we can effectively keep them safe,” Brown said.

Brown expects a cut to the number of mine safety rescue teams as well. However, Madisonville’s KCTCS Mine Rescue Team receives private funding from coal companies and won’t be impacted by the budget cut.

Regional
4:23 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Half-Million Asian Carp Feared Dead in Massive Fish Kill

Cumberland River

Scientists are investigating a massive fish kill in Western Kentucky.  Around half-a-million Asian Carp are reported dead.

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources says the die-off on the Cumberland River  this week occurred just below the Lake Barkley Dam. Only Asian Carp were killed. Aquaculture Specialist Bob Durborow hasn’t seen anything of this magnitude in his 30 years of experience. He’s currently testing specimens.

“Their eyes looked like they were live their gills looked they were from live fish they were a good specimen to check,” said Durborow.  “So, I feel confident that what we find from these fish might give us an indication of what is actually the problem.”

Durborow says a lack of oxygen may be the cause but he’s also investigating the possibility of parasites bacteria and viruses.  Durborow says it could take upwards of a month to complete all tests. Meantime the half-million fish carcasses will be flushed down river.

Economy/Politics
8:22 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Abramson Not Giving Up on Reforming Kentucky's Tax Code

Kentucky Lt. Gov. and former Louisville Mayor Jerry Abramson

Kentucky Lt. Governor Jerry Abramson is still fighting for the legislature to take recommendations from his Blue Ribbon Commission on Tax Reform.

Abramson says he has delivered 59 speeches to encourage constituents to lobby their representatives and senators to take up the issue.

The commission’s report includes 54 suggestions to reform the state tax code and generate an estimated $660-million annually. “The Governor’s working with the leadership to find areas to find common ground to agree on, said Abramson." "I’m out on the trail trying to gin up the involvement of the average guy and gal in a community and I’m asking them to call their legislator, go see their legislator and tell them that they will support that kind of vote."

Abramson says lawmakers are frightened about voting on taxes especially in an election year. He wouldn’t offer odds on whether or not the legislature will take up the issue in January.  The Commonwealth has cut more than $1.6 billion in the last six years.

Abramson has two years remaining as Lt. Governor, but this is his last feasible opportunity to push for tax reform.  Passing tax reform is procedurally less challenging during the upcoming budget session than garnering a two-thirds vote in an off budget year.

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Health
11:38 am
Thu September 26, 2013

Kentucky Not on Federal Exchange Premium List, But Kynect Releases Range of Price

The Department of Health and Human Services released insurance premium prices for federally-run exchanges today, including Tennessee, showing premiums in some states are lower than initially estimated.

But Kentucky’s exchange called kynect is state-run and wasn’t on that list.

Kynect has released the actual costs and range of plans for certain hypothetical situations. Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services spokesperson Gwenda Bond says people can find out their individual costs beginning Oct. 1, which is the first day to apply for open enrollment.

Bond says all but 50,000 of the more than 600,000 uninsured Kentuckians will qualify for either the Medicaid expansion or premium subsidies through kynect.

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Agriculture & Education
1:21 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Comer: Federal Hemp Amendment Would Lead to New Research at Kentucky Schools

Hemp supporters want the crop legalized, pointing out it's not a drug and has economic potential for farmers.

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer says federal legislation that could lead to legalizing commercial hemp production may create  research opportunities at Murray State University. Comer praises the U.S. House of Representatives for passing a farm bill amendment this week that would allow university-level study of the plant that is in the same family as marijuana.

In turn, Murray State and the University of Kentucky have shown interest in developing research programs should the federal farm bill garner Senate approval. Comer says the research amendment was a compromise.

“I’m OK with this because I believe once the universities research it and people see this is not a drug – that it’s a totally different plant than its evil cousin marijuana – that people will realize that this is a crop that is an up-and-comer and that this is something we can use to enhance our manufacturing, said Comer.

The Monroe County native sees value in hemp as a viable alternative to hard plastics that he says are less sustainable and ecologically harmful.

Politics
10:32 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Kentucky Governor Not Pursuing Murray State Presidency

Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear’s Communications Director says the Governor won’t pursue the Presidency at Murray State University. Beshear has been rumored as a potential candidate during the past few months.

MSU is in the process of hiring a search firm to compile and filter candidates for the job. MSU hopes to hire a new president in spring 2014.  Governor Beshear is in his second term which ends in 2015. The job would’ve offered Beshear a chance to boost his state retirement benefits. The presidential job pays nearly double the Governor’s salary.

There is a precedent for a Governor to assume a university presidential role in the Commonwealth. Former Governor Paul Patton serves as the president of the University of Pikeville. But, U-Pike is not a state supported institution.

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Education
8:13 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Lexington Attorney Files Open Meetings Complaint Against Murray State Board of Regents

A Lexington-based attorney with a history representing former Kentucky Governor Ernie Fletcher has sent a complaint to Murray State’s Board of Regents Chair alleging a violation of Kentucky’s Open Meeting law.

Jim Deckard sent the complaint to Dr. Constantine Curris Thursday. Deckard, referencing media reports, says a quorum of regents gathered at regent Sharon Green’s home and discussed board business the night before the board’s quarterly meeting.

At that meeting Curris entertained a motion to vote on whether or not to extend President Randy Dunn’s contract. The discussion wasn’t listed on the board meeting agenda. It was brought up under the guise of “other business.”  The motion to extend Dunn a new four year contract failed by a margin of 7 to 4.

Deckard made the following request in his letter:

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Around the Nation
7:00 am
Sun March 18, 2012

Tenn. Town Fights Fire With Money

Originally published on Sun March 18, 2012 8:57 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Two years ago in South Fulton, Tennessee, firefighters in this town watched a home burn to the ground. The owners hadn't paid the required $75 fee for fire service. Now, after a barrage of national media attention, city leaders have finally made a change. Chad Lampe from member station WKMS in Murray, Kentucky has more.

(SOUNDBITE OF BIRDS CHIRPING)

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