Colin Dwyer

Three weeks after Colombian militants abducted a trio of Ecuadorean press workers, the president of Ecuador, Lenín Moreno, has confirmed what many in the country had feared: Reporter Javier Ortega, photographer Paúl Rivas and driver Efraín Segarra have been killed by a dissident faction of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known as FARC.

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons says it has confirmed the U.K.'s findings on the identity of the poison used against a former Russian spy and his daughter last month.

Updated at 2:45 p.m. ET Thursday

Oh, you've seen them before: those little stickers or tags making clear that if you want your warranty on a product to remain valid, you'd better leave one or more of its parts untouched. The idea, of course, is that consumers are barred from using third-party parts and repair services for the product if they would like to hang on to that guarantee.

Andre Ingram didn't know why his exit interview had been bumped up a day. But he had his bags packed anyway. A longtime veteran of the NBA's minor league, he knew there was no need to dawdle after his season wrapped with the South Bay Lakers in El Segundo, Calif., especially with his wife and their daughters waiting for him in Virginia.

After three members of the Swedish Academy resigned Friday, protesting its response to a long-simmering scandal, the committee known for awarding the Nobel Prize in literature has found itself in unfamiliar — and precarious — territory: Beyond examining the merits of an author's past work, as it does each year, the centuries-old group is now also facing questions about its own future.

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva's deadline has come and gone, and still the former Brazilian president remains a free man — for now, at least. He has hunkered down with his supporters in a São Paulo suburb, some 280 miles from the southern city of Curitiba, where a judge's order had mandated that he present himself to police by 4 p.m. ET Friday.

One month after Sergei and Yulia Skripal collapsed on a shopping center bench, apparently poisoned, the Russian ex-spy and his daughter are showing marked signs of improvement. Hospital officials announced Friday that Sergei is "responding well to treatment, improving rapidly and is no longer in a critical condition," just one week after his daughter reached stable condition.

The last time Saudis could walk into a commercial movie theater, buy a bucket of popcorn and settle in for a silver-screen spectacle, that film may well have been E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Or Tron, maybe — or Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan?

For the second time in less than a month, Tennessee's GOP state lawmakers have declined to proceed on legislation condemning white nationalist and neo-Nazi groups. On Monday, roughly three weeks after a Democratic-sponsored resolution died in committee, GOP state Rep. Ryan Williams quietly requested that the Republican version of the measure be withdrawn.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

Police questioned Nasim Aghdam in her car just hours before she opened fire on YouTube headquarters on Tuesday, wounding three people and apparently killing herself, the Associated Press reported.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET.

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, wife of the late South African leader Nelson Mandela, and a leading anti-apartheid figure in her own right during the country's most turbulent years, has died at age 81.

The Mandela family said in a statement that she died Monday in Johannesburg "after a long illness, for which she had been in and out of hospital since the start of the year."

As of Thursday morning, SB 151 was a bill about sewage services.

But by the time both chambers of the Kentucky Legislature had passed it that night, the amendment process had turned the bill about sewage into a 291-page overhaul of public employees' retirement benefits. Now, it rests on Gov. Matt Bevin's desk awaiting his signature — and teachers across the state are livid.

Updated at 11:11 a.m. ET

Noor Salman, widow of the gunman who opened fire on an Orlando nightclub in 2016, has been found not guilty on both the counts she faced. U.S. District Judge Paul Byron announced the verdict Friday, roughly one month after the trial opened.

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