Emil Moffatt

Station Manager

Emil Moffatt returns to WKU Public Radio as station manager. Moffatt was previously at the station from 2013-2014 as local host of All Things Considered. His new duties also include overseeing operations for WKU’s student station, WWHR 91.7.

Moffatt’s news experience includes a year at Nashville Public Radio and three years at WBAP radio in Dallas. Prior to that, Emil was a minor league baseball play-by-play announcer in Fort Worth, Texas and a producer for Dallas Stars radio broadcasts.  

Moffatt holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Texas at Arlington. He is an avid runner and enjoys movies and live music. 

Lost River Sessions

This month's Lost River Sessions radio show features JD Wilkes in a set recorded at Lost River Cave in Bowling Green.  In the second half of the show, Lucette performs at Hidden Homestead in Smith's Grove, Kentucky. 

As a bonus, we have a brief  feature spotlighting Dom Flemons in an interview conducted in Louisville earlier in 2016. 

Stacey Biggs

Our third Lost River Sessions LIVE! concert at the Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green Nov. 17th also marked, to the best of our knowledge, the first live radio broadcast from the historic theater. It featured stellar performances from The Pennyrilers and Billy Strings. 

Lost River Sessions

Eva Ross performs in the chapel at Fairview Cemetery in Bowling Green in this month's episode of Lost River Sessions on the radio.  Ross is a native of Taylor Mill, Kentucky. Also this month, we hear from father-son guitar duo Eddie & Alonzo Pennington. Their set was recorded at the Pioneer Cabin at WKU. 

Lost River Sessions

Singer/songwriter Tim Easton plays the Crocker Farm Winery on this month's Lost River Sessions radio broadcast. Originally from Akron, Ohio, Easton traveled around Europe for seven years honing his craft. He now lives in Nashville. 

In the second half of the show, Harpeth Rising performs.  The group is made up of Maria Di Meglio on cello, Michelle Younger on banjo and Jordana Greenberg on violin. Their performance was recorded at the Kentucky Museum on the campus of WKU. 

Cheryl Beckley

The Carmonas, Misty Mountain String Band and Dead Broke Barons performed at the first Lost River Sessions Live! concert Thursday night at the Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green. LRS Live! is a new monthly concert series presented by WKU Public Broadcasting. 

Between sets, emcee Barbara Deeb was joined on stage for Q&As with some of the musicians and Lost River Sessions TV producer Darius Barati. 

The next show is set for Oct. 27 and artists will be announced soon. 

 

This month's Lost River Sessions features The Howlin' Brothers, a Nashville trio featuring a mix of bluegrass and blues.  The Howlin Brothers are made up of Ian Craft, JT Huskey and Jared Green.  Their performance was recorded at The Arling in Franklin, Ky. 

In the second half of our show, singer-songwriter Mark Whitley.  His full-time gig is making furniture, but he also sings, plays the guitar and the harmonica.  His concert was recorded at the Brickyard Cafe in Franklin. 

Lost River Sessions

The duo of Rachel Baiman and Christian Sedelmyer play as part of this month's Lost River Sessions episode. They are two, five-string fiddle players who make up 10 String Symphony.  Their performance was recorded at Loving Chapel Stables in Franklin, Ky. 

In the second half of the show, Mt. Victor Revue plays at South Union Shaker Village in Auburn, Ky. Mt. Victor Revue, a Bowling Green band, is made up of Ernie Small on mandolin and vocals, Chris Durbin on banjo and vocals, Eddie Mills on upright bass, Bruce Kessler on guitar and vocals, Bob Zoellner on accordion and Joel Whittinghill on fiddle. 

Lost River Sessions

Episode 5 of Lost River Sessions on radio features Nashville band Forlorn Strangers and Paducah's Red Ember. 

Forlorn Strangers has a new album due out in August.  Their performance was recorded at the Warehouse at Mt. Victor in Bowling Green.  Red Ember's set was recorded at the Phoenix Theater in downtown Bowling Green. 

WKU Public Radio is part of a new regional journalism collaborative known as the Ohio Valley ReSource.  It's made up of public media stations across Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia.  The collaborative will focus on the changing economy in the region and its effect on jobs, healthcare and infrastructure. 

Each station taking part in the Ohio Valley ReSource is hiring a reporter to contribute to the effort.  WKU Public Radio's reporter is Becca Schimmel, who will be based in the Bowling Green newsroom. 

Lost River Sessions

Episode 4 of Lost River Sessions on WKU Public Radio features Kelsey Waldon and the Misty Mountain String Band.  Waldon, originally from the town of Monkey's Eyebrow, Kentucky, performed her Lost River Session inside the Carol Wedge Studio Theater at SKyPAC in Bowling Green. 

The Misty Mountain String Band was recorded at the Corsair Distillery in downtown Bowling Green. The band is made up of Neal Green, Derek Harris, Paul Martin and Brian Vickers. 

Lost River Sessions

Americana band 8 Track Love and singer-songwriter Lauren Cunningham are this month's featured performers on Lost River Sessions from WKU Public Radio. 

8 Track Love is made up of Mike Natcher, Zach Lindsay, Steven Page and David Page.  Their Lost River Session was recorded at the Faculty House at WKU. 

Lost River Sessions

Episode 2 of Lost River Sessions on WKU Public Radio features the Vickie Vaughn Band in a performance recorded at the Historic Railpark and Train Museum in Bowling Green.  In the second half of the show, we enjoy the songs and stories of Nashville singer-songwriter Will Kimbrough. His Lost River Session was recorded at Brickyard Cafe in Franklin, Kentucky. 

Lost River Sessions is produced in association with WKU PBS.

Lost River Sessions

Two bands from our area, The Carmonas and The Dead Broke Barons have been among the groups who have performed on the WKU PBS series Lost River Sessions.  

The show made its WKU Public Radio debut this week. You can hear the show by clicking on the headline of this story. 

The concerts are recorded at various locations around South Central Kentucky. The Dead Broke Barons set was recorded at the Gallery on the Square in Franklin, Ky.  The Carmonas were recorded at Gallery 916 in Bowling Green. 
 

Kentucky’s readiness to respond to an infectious disease outbreak ranks in the bottom half in the nation according to a new report compiled by Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.  The report shows Kentucky meets just 3 of 10 key indicators.

“I think it’s good because it helps to highlight strengths and weaknesses,” said Kentucky's Deputy Health Commissioner Dr. Kraig Humbaugh.  “On the other hand, I think we have to consider that we can’t really compare year-to-year because last year or the year before, they didn’t have the same metrics. And the other thing is, it may not be representative of the state’s preparedness as a whole.”

Dr. Humbaugh says, in general, Kentucky is prepared to handle an outbreak.

One of the categories in which Kentucky did make the grade was vaccinating young children.  Dr. Humbaugh says vaccination is critical for people of all ages.

Clinton Lewis/WKU

Oregon native Bryan Lietzke has been in the U.S. Air Force for eleven years.  He’s been deployed to Afghanistan five times.

On Saturday afternoon he’ll have a new experience: he’ll receive his Bachelor’s Degree in Systems Management from WKU.

What will he feel as he walks across the stage?

“I don’t know…probably satisfaction,” said Lietzke.

Some 1,300 WKU students will receive their diplomas on Saturday at Diddle Arena. But not all of them had quite the same college experience as Lietzke.

Lietzke posted a 4.0 grade point average and he did so while taking his classes online. Some of the classes he took while at Fort Knox, other times at Fort Drum in New York and still other times while in Afghanistan.  

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