Emil Moffatt

Station Manager

Emil Moffatt returns to WKU Public Radio as station manager. Moffatt was previously at the station from 2013-2014 as local host of All Things Considered. His new duties also include overseeing operations for WKU’s student station, WWHR 91.7.

Moffatt’s news experience includes a year at Nashville Public Radio and three years at WBAP radio in Dallas. Prior to that, Emil was a minor league baseball play-by-play announcer in Fort Worth, Texas and a producer for Dallas Stars radio broadcasts.  

Moffatt holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Texas at Arlington. He is an avid runner and enjoys movies and live music. 

WKU Public Radio is part of a new regional journalism collaborative known as the Ohio Valley ReSource.  It's made up of public media stations across Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia.  The collaborative will focus on the changing economy in the region and its effect on jobs, healthcare and infrastructure. 

Each station taking part in the Ohio Valley ReSource is hiring a reporter to contribute to the effort.  WKU Public Radio's reporter is Becca Schimmel, who will be based in the Bowling Green newsroom. 

Lost River Sessions

Episode 4 of Lost River Sessions on WKU Public Radio features Kelsey Waldon and the Misty Mountain String Band.  Waldon, originally from the town of Monkey's Eyebrow, Kentucky, performed her Lost River Session inside the Carol Wedge Studio Theater at SKyPAC in Bowling Green. 

The Misty Mountain String Band was recorded at the Corsair Distillery in downtown Bowling Green. The band is made up of Neal Green, Derek Harris, Paul Martin and Brian Vickers. 

Lost River Sessions

Americana band 8 Track Love and singer-songwriter Lauren Cunningham are this month's featured performers on Lost River Sessions from WKU Public Radio. 

8 Track Love is made up of Mike Natcher, Zach Lindsay, Steven Page and David Page.  Their Lost River Session was recorded at the Faculty House at WKU. 

Lost River Sessions

Episode 2 of Lost River Sessions on WKU Public Radio features the Vickie Vaughn Band in a performance recorded at the Historic Railpark and Train Museum in Bowling Green.  In the second half of the show, we enjoy the songs and stories of Nashville singer-songwriter Will Kimbrough. His Lost River Session was recorded at Brickyard Cafe in Franklin, Kentucky. 

Lost River Sessions is produced in association with WKU PBS.

Lost River Sessions

Two bands from our area, The Carmonas and The Dead Broke Barons have been among the groups who have performed on the WKU PBS series Lost River Sessions.  

The show made its WKU Public Radio debut this week. You can hear the show by clicking on the headline of this story. 

The concerts are recorded at various locations around South Central Kentucky. The Dead Broke Barons set was recorded at the Gallery on the Square in Franklin, Ky.  The Carmonas were recorded at Gallery 916 in Bowling Green. 
 

Kentucky’s readiness to respond to an infectious disease outbreak ranks in the bottom half in the nation according to a new report compiled by Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.  The report shows Kentucky meets just 3 of 10 key indicators.

“I think it’s good because it helps to highlight strengths and weaknesses,” said Kentucky's Deputy Health Commissioner Dr. Kraig Humbaugh.  “On the other hand, I think we have to consider that we can’t really compare year-to-year because last year or the year before, they didn’t have the same metrics. And the other thing is, it may not be representative of the state’s preparedness as a whole.”

Dr. Humbaugh says, in general, Kentucky is prepared to handle an outbreak.

One of the categories in which Kentucky did make the grade was vaccinating young children.  Dr. Humbaugh says vaccination is critical for people of all ages.

Clinton Lewis/WKU

Oregon native Bryan Lietzke has been in the U.S. Air Force for eleven years.  He’s been deployed to Afghanistan five times.

On Saturday afternoon he’ll have a new experience: he’ll receive his Bachelor’s Degree in Systems Management from WKU.

What will he feel as he walks across the stage?

“I don’t know…probably satisfaction,” said Lietzke.

Some 1,300 WKU students will receive their diplomas on Saturday at Diddle Arena. But not all of them had quite the same college experience as Lietzke.

Lietzke posted a 4.0 grade point average and he did so while taking his classes online. Some of the classes he took while at Fort Knox, other times at Fort Drum in New York and still other times while in Afghanistan.  

Kentucky continues leading the nation in a dubious category: the percentage of children living in poverty.  A new report finds that level has gone up 36 percent over the past two years.

Dr. Guy Shrake says the still-recovering economy may be partially to blame for the number of children living below the poverty line

“As a pediatrician myself, it is possible that there still is some residual from the impacts of the recession a number of years ago,” said Dr. Shrake.

But he also cites another factor.

“In a general sense, we do know that more children are in one-parent family than there have been in the past and that that is definitely a cross-connection for having more children in poverty,” said Dr. Shrake.

In 2012, only 23 percent of children in Kentucky were living in poverty. In the most-recent America’s Health Rankings report released today by UnitedHealth Foundation, it’s at nearly 32 percent. 

Christian County Sheriff's Office

One of the K-9 officers working with the Christian County Sheriff’s department is now wearing a high-dollar piece of protective equipment. 

Timo is a seven-year-old Dutch Shepard who’s now sporting a $3,500 bulletproof, stab-resistant vest.  Deputy Sean Head has been Timo’s handler for the last year.

“It’s no different from me going to a call and having no vest on – I kind of feel bare,” said Deputy Head. “It does give me added protection knowing that if I have to place him in danger like that, he has protection as well as I would.”

The vest came from a company called Vested Interest, which received $335,000 in donations to produce the protective gear.  Several law enforcement agencies around the country were selected to receive the special vests. 

Head says he’s trying to encourage other K-9 handlers to apply as well.

Some of the most popular apps designed for smart phones and tablets come from the team at Hitcents, a tech company based in Bowling Green.  The firm received attention earlier this year when it unveiled an iPad app called Hanx Writer that simulated a vintage typewriter. 

Now, they’ve customized the app for the smaller screen of the iPhone. 

Hitcents Graphic designer Ava Oliver says scaling down the design was a difficult task.

“I guess the biggest struggle is that the iPad was more the size of a typewriter – similar.  And then, the iPhone [is] much smaller,” said Oliver. “It was kind of interesting to make those keys small, still beautiful, and yet functional.”

Art director Joe Tudor and says the project was challenging, but rewarding.

“iPads are fun and interesting but they aren’t very portable,” said Tudor.  “Everyone has a phone and a device and it really serves as an extension of the app to get it in more people’s hands. So we’re really excited about the opportunity to let more people experience the app and experience the ‘typewriter feel’.”

 The iPad app proved popular when it was released this summer.  The design for the app is based on vintage typewriters from Tom Hanks’ personal collection.

Someone has paid $28,050 for the right to purchase the first bottle of bourbon produced in Hardin County in nearly 125 years. 

Boundary Oak Distillery churned out its first batch of bourbon this month and held an online auction to sell barrel sponsorships. 

Boundary Oak Master Distiller Brent Goodin says the product inside that barrel should be top quality, when it’s ready to drink in two years.

“We have a very unique distillery in the fact that all of our water comes a spring-fed source. Our grains are all here from Hardin County,” said Goodin. “We think along with those natural aspects of our distillery, along with our wonderful grains that we have here locally, we can make a very superior, high-quality bourbon.”

Goodin says a change in law has made it easier for craft distillers to exist. The $28,000 paid by the auction winner is believed to be one of the top prices ever paid for a Kentucky bourbon.

WKU

A Muhlenberg County woman, whose teaching career spanned more than a half-century, has been selected for induction into the Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame. 

Mary Armstrong remembers taking her first teaching job in 1940.  

“You know I loved every child that I ever had,” said Armstrong.  “My first school was in a two-room school house in Marshall County.  I had [grades] 5-8 and another teacher had 1-4. And, I loved children.”

She then taught 6th grade social studies at Bremen Elementary from 1953 until her retirement in 1999. She says she never stopped thinking about her students, even when she was on vacation.

“In all my traveling, I would take pictures and films and develop them and use them. Like I went to Israel, I had pictures of Israel and I used those when we studied that,” said Armstrong.

Armstrong earned her degree from WKU in 1958.

Emil Moffatt

Abraham Lincoln’s place in history is well-defined. He’s the great emancipator, the man who preserved the Union.   

Jefferson Davis’ legacy, however, is a little more complicated.

The two men were born within 120 miles of each other in rural parts of Kentucky.  Today, the Lincoln birthplace in Hodgenville is a National Park, featuring a granite memorial rising above rolling green hills.

“There’s four flights of the steps as you head up to the memorial, said park superintendent Bill Justice. “They are, in their own way, an invitation to go up and go into the memorial itself."

A replica of the austere log cabin in which Lincoln was born sits inside the ornate structure.

“There’s also a beautiful skylight up above there that provides an opportunity for natural light to flow into the building,” said Justice. “It has a very ‘memorial’ feel to it; the beautiful pink granite around the edge, the plaster-finished fixtures on the wall, the florets in the ceiling.  [It’s a] really, really beautiful interior for this memorial.”

Emil Moffatt

Plans to give the Kentucky High School Basketball Hall of Fame a permanent home continue moving forward. 

The man spearheading the  project, Mike Pollio, says fundraising efforts have netted nearly a million dollars so far.

“We’re really excited about where we are,” said Pollio. “You know a million dollars is obviously a lot of money in today’s times. We’re only about $120 thousand short of building it.”

Pollio says they hope to break ground in July. The Hall of Fame could open a year later.   The Elizabethtown City Council is expected to vote next week on giving organizers a title to the property on West Dixie Avenue.  

Preliminary designs call for a historic church to be used as part of the Hall of Fame. A new building will be constructed next to it.

WKU Athletics

The pregame entertainment prior to WKU’s game with Army this weekend will come from above.

The U.S. Army Parachute team, known as the “Golden Knights” will be performing along with a special guest – WKU president Gary Ransdell. 

Ransdell is scheduled to do a tandem jump while holding on to the game ball.

“This is one way that I think we can highlight the importance of military service, not only to this university, but certainly, most importantly, to our nation and what those young men and women mean to our freedoms and their efforts to protect those freedoms,” said Ransdell.  “So that’s the primary reason I’m doing this.”

And while Ransdell doesn’t regularly jump out of planes, he’s no rookie either.

“I’ve done this once before, this is not my maiden voyage,” said Ransdell.  “I did it at Fort Knox with the Golden Knights a few years ago and it was an amazing experience.  There were 8-10 people standing around watching that one, so this one will be a little bit different.”

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