Joe Corcoran

Morning Edition host; Reporter/Producer

Joe Corcoran has been WKU Public Radio’s “Morning Edition” host and news anchor since 2003. Joe’s received numerous awards for his on-air work including the Associated Press’s “Best Radio News Anchor in Kentucky” twice. Several of his stories have aired on NPR’s “All Things Considered”.

A graduate of Syracuse University, Joe spent most of his career in television journalism both on-air and in management at stations in North Carolina, Iowa and Illinois.

In Bowling Green, Joe is active in his church as well as with the Bowling Green Area of Commerce. He is on the Board of Directors for the Kentucky Associated Press.

He and his wife Patricia are the proud parents of three children and the “extremely” proud grandparents of two granddaughters, Claire and Vivian.

Ways To Connect

Two Warren County natives have seen first-hand the devastation a series of earthquakes has had on Nepal.

The two will be flying home Friday after spending a week in a remote Nepal village. They've been helping villagers rebuild after last week's devastating second earthquake and teaching the villagers how to help themselves.

Tony Rheaume and Lucas Hughes are members of the Woodburn Baptist Church. Church members, family and friends helped fund their relief mission Baptist Medical and Dental Mission International.

The group had to drive five hours out of Kathmandu and then walk another three through the mountains just to reach the village of about 100 people.

"When we came through the mountains, we were real high up so when you looked down it was beautiful, lush land with terraced fields and even aqueducts cut through the mountains," Rheaume said, "It was beautiful until you got close and then, from the front, the houses look perfectly fine, you go to the back of the house and the walls are all gone."

It took nearly six grueling hours and a sleepless night for Indu Bhattari to find out her family was safe following the massive earthquake that devastated the country. 

She was able to talk to her brother in Nepal just minutes after the quake hit, and learned that he and their parents had survived.

"That was a very hard moment for me," the 24-year-old WKU grad student said. "But everybody is fine."

For most of us the news of the Nepal earthquake was riveting, for Indu, it was personal. Her parents live in Kathmandu, Nepal's largest city and a place devastated by unspeakable damage and thousands of deaths. Her brother lives in another part of the country that was spared the brunt of the quake. He was able to get a call through almost immediately.

Bowling Green Parks & Rec had to do a little scrambling after last week's snow and ice storm but Director Brent Belcher says they're open for business, even with their administrative offices housed in a double-wide trailer in the parking lot.

The facility did close to the public Saturday, when parts of the roof started leaking from the weight of all the snow and ice on it, and on Sunday for preliminary damage assessments. Belcher says initial reports show no structural damage.

Besides the administrative offices in their new temporary home, the fitness facility was moved to another location in the building.

The TPM Group of Bowling Green is conducting the assessment for any possible structural damage and Belcher says they should have a better idea of where they stand by the middle of next week.

TVA

With potential record cold weather on the way, the Tennessee Valley Authority is urging consumers to begin reducing electric usage as much as possible beginning Wednesday afternoon at 3:00 Central, 4:00 Eastern time. The utility is calling it a "proactive move".

TVA says arctic temperatures are causing greater demands on their electric system which could affect reliability.

There haven't been any wide-spread power outages in Kentucky because of this week's storm, but Shelley Lowe with Bowling Green Municipal Utilities says they're just "trying to get ahead of the game." She said, "we're trying to be proactive in doing this so we have plenty of power across the TVA valley."

Lowe said everyone doing a little bit can make a big difference. Consumers are asked to not run appliances if they're not needed, unplug power cords and, most importantly, turn down the thermostat. "Even if it's just a couple of degrees," she said, "that will help us with energy consumption."

Lowering the thermostat just one degree, say from 68 degrees down to 67, can save as much as 3% on a monthly bill.

And Lowe says BGMU is putting their money where their mouth is. They've begun wearing sweaters and coats at their downtown office building after they turned their thermostats down to 60 degrees.

Abbey Oldham

The oldest and one of the best known buildings in Warren County will no longer sit vacant in downtown Bowling Green.

The Mariah Moore House on State Street has been empty since last April when Mariah's restaurant was purchased and moved across town to the new HitCents Plaza. Now WKU alumnus and philanthropist Dale Augenstein has confirmed he signed a contract to move a Steamer's Seafood restaurant into the building by the end of the summer. He declined to reveal the purchase price.

Bowling Green will be the host of the tournaments for the next five years in a partnership announced at the Bowling Green Ball Park Wednesday morning. The city will host eleven tournaments this year and as many as 15 beginning next year.

The conference will also hold at least six league meetings in Bowling Green throughout the year.

The NAIA conference includes Campbellsville University, Lindsey Wilson College and the University of Pikeville as well as schools in five other states. They'll kick off the partnership February 6th and 7th wil the conference bowling tournament at Southern Lanes in Bowling Green

Conference commissioner Eric Ward said they were afraid the championships might fall under the public's radar in a city larger than Bowling Green. He said the conference was looking for a neutral site that was big enough to handle several tournaments back to back or even at the same time at different facilities.

He also said they wanted a site with a variety of things for players and fans to do when their team isn't playing.

Amy Cardwell with the Bowling Green Area Convention and Visitors' Bureau estimates each tournament will bring about 250 participants to the city and twice that many family and fans.

Two Grayson County teenagers suspected in a crime spree across the South are expected to return to Kentucky this week to face felony charges. 

Eighteen-year-old Dalton Hayes and his 13-year-old girlfriend Cheyenne Phillips were arrested Sunday in Panama City, Florida after spending 14 days on the lam.

Grayson County Sheriff Norman Chaffin knows why Hayes went on the run.

"I don't know what was going through her head, but I know Dalton pretty well.  He just didn't want to face charges for what he was already under possible indictment for," Chaffins told WKU Public Radio.  "He was on bond for burglary and theft charges, so that certainly motivated him to try to get away from taking responsibility for what his actions were."

The sheriff says he has spoken with Hayes and the teen is “very scared” and wants to come home. 

He and Phillips face a host of charges, including burglary, theft, criminal trespassing, and criminal mischief.  Their travels took them to through multiple states and police believe they were getting by on stolen cash and vehicles.

The Battle of New Orleans 200 years ago this week has been immortalized in movies, books and songs. Our panel of historians Dr. Jack Thacker and Dr. Glenn LaFantasie tell Joe Corcoran it could have had a different outcome without a couple of thousand Kentuckians and their guns.

The two day Battle of Nashville was marked by delays, confusion, some say incompetence and bitter, vicious warfare. WKU historians Dr. Glenn LaFantasie and Dr. Jack Thacker say when it was all over the Confederate Army was decimated and in disarray, Nashville was secure and the War was beginning its end.

Construction is set to begin in March on a $56 million business development in Radcliff that's expected to bring in as many as 600 new jobs. Radcliff mayor J.J. Duvall said the announcement of a Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market coming in to anchor the development project was the "final piece of the puzzle."

Duvall and his team have been working on the 22 acre development for more than three years. It will be located off 31W and Joe Prather Highway on the city's south end.

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