Joe Corcoran

Morning Edition host; Reporter/Producer

Joe Corcoran has been WKU Public Radio’s “Morning Edition” host and news anchor since 2003. Joe’s received numerous awards for his on-air work including the Associated Press’s “Best Radio News Anchor in Kentucky” twice. Several of his stories have aired on NPR’s “All Things Considered”.

A graduate of Syracuse University, Joe spent most of his career in television journalism both on-air and in management at stations in North Carolina, Iowa and Illinois.

In Bowling Green, Joe is active in his church as well as with the Bowling Green Area of Commerce. He is on the Board of Directors for the Kentucky Associated Press.

He and his wife Patricia are the proud parents of three children and the “extremely” proud grandparents of two granddaughters, Claire and Vivian.

Ways to Connect

Darius Barati, WKU PBS

Both sophomores Natalie Webb of Louisville and Kaitlin Weyman of Alexandria say they're glad to be alive following the terrorist attacks that killed 129 people.

The two are spending this semester studying abroad at Harlaxton College in England about an hour north of London. They took a quick sight-seeing trip to Paris the weekend of the attacks.

Even though they were in the middle of the city that night, Webb told WKU Public Radio they didn't realize how serious the attacks were until they got back to their hotel room.  The hardest part of the ordeal was not knowing what was going to happen next. "There were three of us in the room and we were all crying at one point, we were panicking because we didn't know if we were going to be next," she said, "We didn't know if it was over, if it was still happening. We had no way to know where it was because information was so spotty."

And Webb says the rest of the weekend was just as stressful. "We were worried about people on the street. I was terrified to be in a restaurant, in a public place. It affected how we saw things."

Both young women were able to fly out of Paris and back to London safely Sunday morning. They say the got to Charles de Gaulle Airport six hours early to make sure they'd make it on time.

Bowling Green police and state police troopers are looking for a Bowling Green man they say dragged a city police officer in his car during an attempted arrest overnight.

Both city and state police fired shots at 30 year old Adrian Barnes and a woman who was with him, it’s not known if they were hit.

Detectives with the Warren County Drug Task Force and State police drug enforcement located Barnes in a Dollar General parking lot on KY 185 last night and were in the process of arresting him on previous charges when they say he took off in his Ford Explorer dragging a police officer with him for a short distance. That’s when two officers fired shots at Barnes.

His vehicle was found abandoned near the scene a short time later on Double Springs Road.

Police have added assault charges to Barnes on top of the drug related charges they were originally trying to arrest him for.

Police say Barnes is considered dangerous and anyone with any information is asked to call police.

One of the best vegetable gardens in Owensboro is growing in one of the most unlikely places. The two and a half acre garden has been turning out bushels full of tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, corn and cucumbers inside the walls of the Daviess County Detention Center.

Joe Corcoran visited the jail and reports the tons of vegetables are helping the inmates in more ways than one.

It took more than 150 writers and researchers nearly seven years and $400,000 to get the one-of-a-kind book published. Now that it is, one of the editors of The Kentucky African American Encyclopedia, WKU historian Dr. John Hardin, says it'll serve as the "go to" place for African American research for years to come.

Dr. Hardin spoke with Joe Corcoran about the book and its significance.

Bowling Green's little league team may not still be alive in the Little League World Series for this weekend's championship games, but Joe Corcoran reports they couldn't hold the tournament without a big Bowling Green presence.

Kentucky will have a representative in the Little League World Series.

An eight-run explosion in the 2nd inning carried Kentucky's Bowling Green Little League team to a 13-0 win in four innings over Wisconsin Saturday to win the Great Lakes Regional Championship.

The last time a Kentucky team won the Great Lakes Region was La Grange in 2011.

The Bowling Green team now goes on to face the West Regional Champion Sweetwater Valley from Oregon in the first round of the Little League World Series in Williamsport, PA. That game will be Thursday evening.

The team went right to Pennsylvania following Saturday's game in Indianapolis. Their head coach Rick Kelley told WKU Public Radio the 11, 12 and 13 year old boys don't really show their emotion on their sleeve but, "they have to be overwhelmed by the whole sight."

Their dorm overlooks the field they'll be playing on during the Series.

Kelley said many of the boys have never even been out of Warren County before so it's "good to see them taking advantage of this once-in-a-lifetime experience." Kelley says they're hanging out in the stadium's rec room playing Ping Pong with players from other teams who are there from all over the world.

Kelley said, "It's really amazing to see how much the boys have matured in just the last six weeks, but this takes then to a whole other level. They're missing a lot of classroom time back home, but they're learning more life experience on this trip than they ever could in the classroom."

Dora James, the Western Kentucky Regional Organizer of the Fairness Campaign, led the 50 or so people at the Federal courthouse in downtown Bowling Green Friday afternoon in a chant of "What do we want?" "Fairness" "When do we want it?" "Now". And for supporters of same-sex marriage, they got that fairness Friday morning when a split U.S. Supreme Court ruled same-sex couples have a right to be married anywhere in the country.

The decision reverberated all across the country immediately and all day long up to and including the courthouse where James addressed the rain-soaked crowd saying, "So on this day love won for all Americans including all Kentuckians. This time yesterday there were only 37 states in the country with marriage equality and today there's all 50 of them. So how fantastic is that?"


It doesn't sound all that serious, but the problem of horse manure has been all anybody's been talking about in one Logan County town for months. It's dividing long-time friendships and threatening the very way of life for a group of people who just want to be left alone.

The manure problem got so bad, the Auburn city council passed a revised city ordinance over the winter requiring what they called "collection devices" be placed on all horses or other large animals to collect their waste before it landed on the street. They say it's for all animals but it's directed at the Amish and their traditional way of travel, horse and buggy.

Just before 8:00 on a recent Saturday morning, Amish elder Amos Mast and his wife pull into Auburn's Minit Mart. The 150 or so Amish in the county don't need much from town, their religion and life-style demand self-sufficiency, but on this morning Amos Mast needs some gas for his table saw at his woodworking and furniture making shop.


The search for a missing Monroe County 2 year old girl and her alleged abductor ended Monday afternoon close to where it began more than a week ago.

Anthony Barbour was arrested at 1:16 pm at the Temple Hill Volunteer Fire Department in Monroe County. An hour later Kentucky State Police located the body of 2 year old Laynee Wallace in an area close to where she was originally reported missing May 17th.

An autopsy will be performed this week in Louisville.

State Police worked with local, federal and other agencies in the investigation. Detective Adam Morgan with the State Police Bowling Green post will be the lead investigator.

Barbour's vehicle, a red 2000 Pontiac Sunfire, was located last Tuesday evening abandoned in a field. Barbour was considered armed and dangerous during the search.

Laynee Wallace was reported missing from her home on East Temple Hill Road in Monroe County Sunday May 17. State Police were notified two days later. The 25 year old Barbour was identified as the boyfriend of the little girl's biological mother.

Two Warren County natives have seen first-hand the devastation a series of earthquakes has had on Nepal.

The two will be flying home Friday after spending a week in a remote Nepal village. They've been helping villagers rebuild after last week's devastating second earthquake and teaching the villagers how to help themselves.

Tony Rheaume and Lucas Hughes are members of the Woodburn Baptist Church. Church members, family and friends helped fund their relief mission Baptist Medical and Dental Mission International.

The group had to drive five hours out of Kathmandu and then walk another three through the mountains just to reach the village of about 100 people.

"When we came through the mountains, we were real high up so when you looked down it was beautiful, lush land with terraced fields and even aqueducts cut through the mountains," Rheaume said, "It was beautiful until you got close and then, from the front, the houses look perfectly fine, you go to the back of the house and the walls are all gone."