Joe Corcoran

Morning Edition host; Reporter/Producer

Joe Corcoran has been WKU Public Radio’s “Morning Edition” host and news anchor since 2003. Joe’s received numerous awards for his on-air work including the Associated Press’s “Best Radio News Anchor in Kentucky” twice. Several of his stories have aired on NPR’s “All Things Considered”.

A graduate of Syracuse University, Joe spent most of his career in television journalism both on-air and in management at stations in North Carolina, Iowa and Illinois.

In Bowling Green, Joe is active in his church as well as with the Bowling Green Area of Commerce. He is on the Board of Directors for the Kentucky Associated Press.

He and his wife Patricia are the proud parents of three children and the “extremely” proud grandparents of two granddaughters, Claire and Vivian.

Ways To Connect

Kentucky will have a representative in the Little League World Series.

An eight-run explosion in the 2nd inning carried Kentucky's Bowling Green Little League team to a 13-0 win in four innings over Wisconsin Saturday to win the Great Lakes Regional Championship.

The last time a Kentucky team won the Great Lakes Region was La Grange in 2011.

The Bowling Green team now goes on to face the West Regional Champion Sweetwater Valley from Oregon in the first round of the Little League World Series in Williamsport, PA. That game will be Thursday evening.

The team went right to Pennsylvania following Saturday's game in Indianapolis. Their head coach Rick Kelley told WKU Public Radio the 11, 12 and 13 year old boys don't really show their emotion on their sleeve but, "they have to be overwhelmed by the whole sight."

Their dorm overlooks the field they'll be playing on during the Series.

Kelley said many of the boys have never even been out of Warren County before so it's "good to see them taking advantage of this once-in-a-lifetime experience." Kelley says they're hanging out in the stadium's rec room playing Ping Pong with players from other teams who are there from all over the world.

Kelley said, "It's really amazing to see how much the boys have matured in just the last six weeks, but this takes then to a whole other level. They're missing a lot of classroom time back home, but they're learning more life experience on this trip than they ever could in the classroom."

Dora James, the Western Kentucky Regional Organizer of the Fairness Campaign, led the 50 or so people at the Federal courthouse in downtown Bowling Green Friday afternoon in a chant of "What do we want?" "Fairness" "When do we want it?" "Now". And for supporters of same-sex marriage, they got that fairness Friday morning when a split U.S. Supreme Court ruled same-sex couples have a right to be married anywhere in the country.

The decision reverberated all across the country immediately and all day long up to and including the courthouse where James addressed the rain-soaked crowd saying, "So on this day love won for all Americans including all Kentuckians. This time yesterday there were only 37 states in the country with marriage equality and today there's all 50 of them. So how fantastic is that?"

iStockPhoto

It doesn't sound all that serious, but the problem of horse manure has been all anybody's been talking about in one Logan County town for months. It's dividing long-time friendships and threatening the very way of life for a group of people who just want to be left alone.

The manure problem got so bad, the Auburn city council passed a revised city ordinance over the winter requiring what they called "collection devices" be placed on all horses or other large animals to collect their waste before it landed on the street. They say it's for all animals but it's directed at the Amish and their traditional way of travel, horse and buggy.

Just before 8:00 on a recent Saturday morning, Amish elder Amos Mast and his wife pull into Auburn's Minit Mart. The 150 or so Amish in the county don't need much from town, their religion and life-style demand self-sufficiency, but on this morning Amos Mast needs some gas for his table saw at his woodworking and furniture making shop.

KSP

The search for a missing Monroe County 2 year old girl and her alleged abductor ended Monday afternoon close to where it began more than a week ago.

Anthony Barbour was arrested at 1:16 pm at the Temple Hill Volunteer Fire Department in Monroe County. An hour later Kentucky State Police located the body of 2 year old Laynee Wallace in an area close to where she was originally reported missing May 17th.

An autopsy will be performed this week in Louisville.

State Police worked with local, federal and other agencies in the investigation. Detective Adam Morgan with the State Police Bowling Green post will be the lead investigator.

Barbour's vehicle, a red 2000 Pontiac Sunfire, was located last Tuesday evening abandoned in a field. Barbour was considered armed and dangerous during the search.

Laynee Wallace was reported missing from her home on East Temple Hill Road in Monroe County Sunday May 17. State Police were notified two days later. The 25 year old Barbour was identified as the boyfriend of the little girl's biological mother.

Two Warren County natives have seen first-hand the devastation a series of earthquakes has had on Nepal.

The two will be flying home Friday after spending a week in a remote Nepal village. They've been helping villagers rebuild after last week's devastating second earthquake and teaching the villagers how to help themselves.

Tony Rheaume and Lucas Hughes are members of the Woodburn Baptist Church. Church members, family and friends helped fund their relief mission Baptist Medical and Dental Mission International.

The group had to drive five hours out of Kathmandu and then walk another three through the mountains just to reach the village of about 100 people.

"When we came through the mountains, we were real high up so when you looked down it was beautiful, lush land with terraced fields and even aqueducts cut through the mountains," Rheaume said, "It was beautiful until you got close and then, from the front, the houses look perfectly fine, you go to the back of the house and the walls are all gone."

It took nearly six grueling hours and a sleepless night for Indu Bhattari to find out her family was safe following the massive earthquake that devastated the country. 

She was able to talk to her brother in Nepal just minutes after the quake hit, and learned that he and their parents had survived.

"That was a very hard moment for me," the 24-year-old WKU grad student said. "But everybody is fine."

For most of us the news of the Nepal earthquake was riveting, for Indu, it was personal. Her parents live in Kathmandu, Nepal's largest city and a place devastated by unspeakable damage and thousands of deaths. Her brother lives in another part of the country that was spared the brunt of the quake. He was able to get a call through almost immediately.

Bowling Green Parks & Rec had to do a little scrambling after last week's snow and ice storm but Director Brent Belcher says they're open for business, even with their administrative offices housed in a double-wide trailer in the parking lot.

The facility did close to the public Saturday, when parts of the roof started leaking from the weight of all the snow and ice on it, and on Sunday for preliminary damage assessments. Belcher says initial reports show no structural damage.

Besides the administrative offices in their new temporary home, the fitness facility was moved to another location in the building.

The TPM Group of Bowling Green is conducting the assessment for any possible structural damage and Belcher says they should have a better idea of where they stand by the middle of next week.

TVA

With potential record cold weather on the way, the Tennessee Valley Authority is urging consumers to begin reducing electric usage as much as possible beginning Wednesday afternoon at 3:00 Central, 4:00 Eastern time. The utility is calling it a "proactive move".

TVA says arctic temperatures are causing greater demands on their electric system which could affect reliability.

There haven't been any wide-spread power outages in Kentucky because of this week's storm, but Shelley Lowe with Bowling Green Municipal Utilities says they're just "trying to get ahead of the game." She said, "we're trying to be proactive in doing this so we have plenty of power across the TVA valley."

Lowe said everyone doing a little bit can make a big difference. Consumers are asked to not run appliances if they're not needed, unplug power cords and, most importantly, turn down the thermostat. "Even if it's just a couple of degrees," she said, "that will help us with energy consumption."

Lowering the thermostat just one degree, say from 68 degrees down to 67, can save as much as 3% on a monthly bill.

And Lowe says BGMU is putting their money where their mouth is. They've begun wearing sweaters and coats at their downtown office building after they turned their thermostats down to 60 degrees.

Abbey Oldham

The oldest and one of the best known buildings in Warren County will no longer sit vacant in downtown Bowling Green.

The Mariah Moore House on State Street has been empty since last April when Mariah's restaurant was purchased and moved across town to the new HitCents Plaza. Now WKU alumnus and philanthropist Dale Augenstein has confirmed he signed a contract to move a Steamer's Seafood restaurant into the building by the end of the summer. He declined to reveal the purchase price.

Bowling Green will be the host of the tournaments for the next five years in a partnership announced at the Bowling Green Ball Park Wednesday morning. The city will host eleven tournaments this year and as many as 15 beginning next year.

The conference will also hold at least six league meetings in Bowling Green throughout the year.

The NAIA conference includes Campbellsville University, Lindsey Wilson College and the University of Pikeville as well as schools in five other states. They'll kick off the partnership February 6th and 7th wil the conference bowling tournament at Southern Lanes in Bowling Green

Conference commissioner Eric Ward said they were afraid the championships might fall under the public's radar in a city larger than Bowling Green. He said the conference was looking for a neutral site that was big enough to handle several tournaments back to back or even at the same time at different facilities.

He also said they wanted a site with a variety of things for players and fans to do when their team isn't playing.

Amy Cardwell with the Bowling Green Area Convention and Visitors' Bureau estimates each tournament will bring about 250 participants to the city and twice that many family and fans.

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