Joe Corcoran

Morning Edition host; Reporter/Producer

Joe Corcoran has been WKU Public Radio’s “Morning Edition” host and news anchor since 2003. Joe’s received numerous awards for his on-air work including the Associated Press’s “Best Radio News Anchor in Kentucky” twice. Several of his stories have aired on NPR’s “All Things Considered”.

A graduate of Syracuse University, Joe spent most of his career in television journalism both on-air and in management at stations in North Carolina, Iowa and Illinois.

In Bowling Green, Joe is active in his church as well as with the Bowling Green Area of Commerce. He is on the Board of Directors for the Kentucky Associated Press.

He and his wife Patricia are the proud parents of three children and the “extremely” proud grandparents of two granddaughters, Claire and Vivian.

Ways To Connect

Construction is set to begin in March on a $56 million business development in Radcliff that's expected to bring in as many as 600 new jobs. Radcliff mayor J.J. Duvall said the announcement of a Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market coming in to anchor the development project was the "final piece of the puzzle."

Duvall and his team have been working on the 22 acre development for more than three years. It will be located off 31W and Joe Prather Highway on the city's south end.

At their regular meeting Monday night, the Warren County school board voted to appeal, for the fourth time, a ruling by the Kentucky Board of Education concerning the on-going non-resident student dispute with the Bowling Green school district.

In a press release sent out after the meeting, Superintendent Rob Clayton said the vote was really a technicality. He said it doesn't necessarily mean any more legal action will be taken just yet but it gives them that option should upcoming mandated mediation between the two school boards fail.

The long awaited final extension of the bypass around Elizabethtown got a big step toward completion Wednesday morning when Governor Beshear presented a $4.5 million check to the city for pre-construction funding.

The money represents estimates in the 2014 Highway Plan for right-of-way acquisition and utilities work for the final Ring Road segment.

The concept of a Ring Road bypass goes back to planning studies in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The project first appeared in the Kentucky Highway Plan in 1998 and has been built in stages,initially as a two-lane road but since widened to five lanes and now providing access to commercial and industrial business sites.

It currently runs from U.S. 31W, around the western side of Elizabethtown to connect with the Western Kentucky Parkway. The final extension will connect with I-65.

Photo courtesy of Philip Scott Andrews

When NASA called an end to the space shuttle in 2011 after 30 years, it really was "The End of an Era." That's the title of a photo and video display in the Mass Media & Technology building on WKU's campus through November 8th.

It tells the story of the shuttle through dozens of photos taken from the collection of Scott Andrews, who shot all but three of the missions, and his son Philip who worked with his father for the program's last five years.

Joe Corcoran spoke with Philip about the display and about his dad's career shooting history.

You can see them every Friday morning working away at their garden at WKU's farm and on Saturdays selling what they've raised at Bowling Green's Community Farmers' Market.

They're the Top Crops crew and, week after week, under the guidance of Bill and Carol Greer, this group of special needs adults continues to stretch the boundaries of just what farming can do.

WKU Public Radio's Joe Corcoran paid a visit to a Bowling Green farmers market to learn more about the impact of the Top Crops program.

Second district Republican Congressman Brett Guthrie calls the members of ISIL "evil people that need to be stopped.

Speaking in Bowling Green, Guthrie said he supports Obama's actions fighting ISIL in Syria, especially bringing in other countries to join the fight. He said he wants to see "their boots on the ground, not our boots on the ground."

The Bowling Green Republican held a late afternoon Town Hall meeting at WKU's Carroll Knicely Center Wednesday; he'll hold one more next week in Edmonson County.

Court Appointed Special Advocates of South Central Kentucky has received a $100,000 gift from Commonwealth Broadcasting.  CASA is a non-profit agency that helps child victims of abuse, neglect, or dependency find safe foster homes. 

The donation will benefit CASA's $2 million I am for the Child campaign which aims to expand programs and increase public awareness of CASA's role in the community.  The gift also includes a free, five-year lease at Commonwealth Broadcasting's headquarters on the Glasgow public square. 

"We've been serving children from the Glasgow area for over ten years but this is the first time we have a physical office there that people can come to and where we can meet with our advocates," CASA Executive Director Will Constable told WKU Public Radio.

CASA currently serves about 160 children, mostly from Warren County.

WKU Sports

Tonight's season opening home football game for the WKU Hilltoppers might actually feel more like an away game for them.

Home or away, teams usually sequester themselves in a hotel the night before a game to get themselves focused and go over last minute details without distractions. But with thousands of Corvette enthusiasts in town for the 20th anniversary of the Corvette Museum this weekend, there were no available hotel rooms in Bowling Green.

Warren County Public Schools filed a brief with the Kentucky Board of Education Friday formally appealing Commissioner Terry Holliday's final Order in the on-going dispute over non-resident students.

The state board will hear arguments October 7 in Frankfort from attorneys for both the county and city school districts.

There have already been two rulings against the county school system in its fight to prevent as many as 750 students from being allowed to attend city schools. In June, county schools' attorney Jacinta Porter filed an 80 page document of exceptions against hearing officer Mike Wilson's recommendation favoring the city district that was essentially the same ruling he made a year ago.

A national gathering of state legislators has included six Kentucky laws in its list of suggested legislation for the rest of the nation.

The Lexington based Council of State Governments cited the state's statutes related to altered cash registers, clearing criminal records of victims of forced prostitution and requiring businesses to report data breaches as models for other lawmakers to use. The complete list of suggestions will be included in a booklet this winter.

The other Kentucky measures cited provide civil liability protections to engineers and architects who volunteer their services after a natural disaster, allowing victims of domestic violence and sexual assault to remove their addresses from public voter registration rolls and automatically terminating parental and custody rights of anyone convicted of felony rape when the mother keeps the child.

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