Joe Corcoran

Morning Edition host; Reporter/Producer

Joe Corcoran has been WKU Public Radio’s “Morning Edition” host and news anchor since 2003. Joe’s received numerous awards for his on-air work including the Associated Press’s “Best Radio News Anchor in Kentucky” twice. Several of his stories have aired on NPR’s “All Things Considered”.

A graduate of Syracuse University, Joe spent most of his career in television journalism both on-air and in management at stations in North Carolina, Iowa and Illinois.

In Bowling Green, Joe is active in his church as well as with the Bowling Green Area of Commerce. He is on the Board of Directors for the Kentucky Associated Press.

He and his wife Patricia are the proud parents of three children and the “extremely” proud grandparents of two granddaughters, Claire and Vivian.

Ways To Connect

Photo courtesy of Philip Scott Andrews

When NASA called an end to the space shuttle in 2011 after 30 years, it really was "The End of an Era." That's the title of a photo and video display in the Mass Media & Technology building on WKU's campus through November 8th.

It tells the story of the shuttle through dozens of photos taken from the collection of Scott Andrews, who shot all but three of the missions, and his son Philip who worked with his father for the program's last five years.

Joe Corcoran spoke with Philip about the display and about his dad's career shooting history.

You can see them every Friday morning working away at their garden at WKU's farm and on Saturdays selling what they've raised at Bowling Green's Community Farmers' Market.

They're the Top Crops crew and, week after week, under the guidance of Bill and Carol Greer, this group of special needs adults continues to stretch the boundaries of just what farming can do.

WKU Public Radio's Joe Corcoran paid a visit to a Bowling Green farmers market to learn more about the impact of the Top Crops program.

Second district Republican Congressman Brett Guthrie calls the members of ISIL "evil people that need to be stopped.

Speaking in Bowling Green, Guthrie said he supports Obama's actions fighting ISIL in Syria, especially bringing in other countries to join the fight. He said he wants to see "their boots on the ground, not our boots on the ground."

The Bowling Green Republican held a late afternoon Town Hall meeting at WKU's Carroll Knicely Center Wednesday; he'll hold one more next week in Edmonson County.

Court Appointed Special Advocates of South Central Kentucky has received a $100,000 gift from Commonwealth Broadcasting.  CASA is a non-profit agency that helps child victims of abuse, neglect, or dependency find safe foster homes. 

The donation will benefit CASA's $2 million I am for the Child campaign which aims to expand programs and increase public awareness of CASA's role in the community.  The gift also includes a free, five-year lease at Commonwealth Broadcasting's headquarters on the Glasgow public square. 

"We've been serving children from the Glasgow area for over ten years but this is the first time we have a physical office there that people can come to and where we can meet with our advocates," CASA Executive Director Will Constable told WKU Public Radio.

CASA currently serves about 160 children, mostly from Warren County.

WKU Sports

Tonight's season opening home football game for the WKU Hilltoppers might actually feel more like an away game for them.

Home or away, teams usually sequester themselves in a hotel the night before a game to get themselves focused and go over last minute details without distractions. But with thousands of Corvette enthusiasts in town for the 20th anniversary of the Corvette Museum this weekend, there were no available hotel rooms in Bowling Green.

Warren County Public Schools filed a brief with the Kentucky Board of Education Friday formally appealing Commissioner Terry Holliday's final Order in the on-going dispute over non-resident students.

The state board will hear arguments October 7 in Frankfort from attorneys for both the county and city school districts.

There have already been two rulings against the county school system in its fight to prevent as many as 750 students from being allowed to attend city schools. In June, county schools' attorney Jacinta Porter filed an 80 page document of exceptions against hearing officer Mike Wilson's recommendation favoring the city district that was essentially the same ruling he made a year ago.

A national gathering of state legislators has included six Kentucky laws in its list of suggested legislation for the rest of the nation.

The Lexington based Council of State Governments cited the state's statutes related to altered cash registers, clearing criminal records of victims of forced prostitution and requiring businesses to report data breaches as models for other lawmakers to use. The complete list of suggestions will be included in a booklet this winter.

The other Kentucky measures cited provide civil liability protections to engineers and architects who volunteer their services after a natural disaster, allowing victims of domestic violence and sexual assault to remove their addresses from public voter registration rolls and automatically terminating parental and custody rights of anyone convicted of felony rape when the mother keeps the child.

Photo by WKU Public Radio photojournalist Abbey Oldham

"It's an exciting time to be a Hilltopper."

That's how first year head coach Jeff Brohm started off WKU football media day inside Houchens Industries-L.T. Smith Stadium Saturday morning, just hours before the first of the team's 23 scheduled practices that afternoon.

Besides a new head coach, the third in the past three years, the Tops begin the season in a new conference, moving to Conference USA this summer after decades in the Sun Belt Conference. They finished 8-4 last year, their eighth season in the Football Bowl Subdivision.

"We're excited about joining the new conference," Brohm said, "It'll be a challenge for us and we'll have to earn respect but that's what college football is all about if you want to become the best."

Brohm said the team had a good summer working on strength and conditioning to get in the best shape possible so a lot of players can see game action on both sides of the ball and they can stay fresh. But right now, all the team is thinking about and working towards is the first game of the regular season.

WKU Athletics

After 32 years as a member of the Sun Belt Conference, WKU has now officially become a member of the newly re-aligned, 14 member Conference USA. It's a move Athletic Director Todd Stewart has been working toward for several years, but even he admits it's a high-risk, high-reward situation.

Stewart spoke with Joe Corcoran about leaving the comforts of the Sun Belt for the new challenges ahead.

Kentucky State Police in Bowling Green were contacted by the Logan County Detention Center regarding an inmate that had escaped.

21 year old Christopher Scarbrough of Russellville is described as a white male, 5'11", 160 pounds with brown hair and eyes. He was last seen at the Logan County Detention Center Sunday afternoon.

Anyone with any information on Scarbrough's whereabouts is asked to call State Police at 1-800-222-5555.

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