Joe Corcoran

Morning Edition host; Reporter/Producer

Joe Corcoran has been WKU Public Radio’s “Morning Edition” host and news anchor since 2003. Joe’s received numerous awards for his on-air work including the Associated Press’s “Best Radio News Anchor in Kentucky” twice. Several of his stories have aired on NPR’s “All Things Considered”.

A graduate of Syracuse University, Joe spent most of his career in television journalism both on-air and in management at stations in North Carolina, Iowa and Illinois.

In Bowling Green, Joe is active in his church as well as with the Bowling Green Area of Commerce. He is on the Board of Directors for the Kentucky Associated Press.

He and his wife Patricia are the proud parents of three children and the “extremely” proud grandparents of two granddaughters, Claire and Vivian.

Ways To Connect

Last month's indictments of four adults within the Steubenville, Ohio school system are the latest turn in the high profile 2012 rape case of a 16 year old girl by two high school football players. It was alleged that adults within the school system and the town acted to cover up the incident.

The girl and her family may never have found justice if it wasn't for the national attention the case received; on-line attention brought by a man known then only as "Kentucky Anonymous". Deric Lostutter has since revealed his identity as he fights the legal system for his own freedom.

Blake Pillow rushed for 150 yards and Blue Tisdale put up three touchdowns as Bowling Green High School scored 49 unanswered points to roll past Pulaski County High 49-14 in the KHSAA Class 5A championship game at Houchens Industries/L.T. Smith Stadium at WKU Sunday afternoon.

The win marks the Purples third consecutive state championship and their third straight undefeated season.

Pulaski County jumped out to a 14-0 lead behind a 25 yard score from quarterback Riley Hall, who finished the game with 41 yards on the ground while completing 19 of 31 passes for 163 yards and a touchdown.

Pulaski County finishes their season at 14-1.

Kentucky's tobacco industry has undergone major changes in the past few decades from the way it's grown and harvested, to the way it's sold and marketed. WKU folklore professor Dr. Ann Ferrell spent the past eight years researching what the changes have meant to tobacco families and what the future holds in her new book "Burley: Kentucky Tobacco in a New Century".

Warren County sheriff Jerry "Peanuts" Gaines has been sworn in as the newest president of the Kentucky Association of Counties Executive Board. Gaines is the first sheriff to ever serve in the one-year position.

Gaines said he wants to bring more conferences and meetings of the group to the Warren County area and work with local officials such as Kentucky Supreme Court Chief Justice John Minton to develop a better way for sheriff's offices serving papers.

But overall, Gaines says KACo runs well and he just wants to continue the success it's had so far.

Since the beginning of the 1990's, the percentage of Kentucky's population comprised of immigrants has soared by more than 300%. While their overall number is still small, WKU economics professor Dr. Brian Strow says their effect is being felt and it's a net plus.

Strow's study shows immigrants locally have a higher employment percentage than native born people and a higher mean income. There's also a higher number who are self-employed.

Joe Corcoran spoke with Dr. Strow about the benefits of immigrant entrepreneurs.

WKU head football coach Bobby Petrino has suspended star linebacker Andrew Jackson indefinitely beginning with this weekend's game against Georgia State in Atlanta.

In a written statement, Petrino said Jackson did not meet the expectations they set forth for all their players but, if Jackson meets conditions laid out for him, he'll be back on the team for next weekend's game against Army.

In an overnight tweet, Jackson apologized to fans saying he missed team meetings Monday morning. He said while that was unacceptable, he plans to learn from his mistakes and expects to play against Army.

Thursday night's Halloween trick or treating is expected to be hampered by potentially severe weather coming into south-central Kentucky.

Wind gusts up to 40 mph are expected along with locally heavy rainfall. A wind advisory is in effect from 3:00 central time this afternoon until midnight.

Hart, Ohio and Muhlenberg Counties have delayed their Halloween activities until Friday night along with the towns of Bonnieville, Munfordville, Glasgow, Cave City, Park City, Elkton, Russellville and Franklin.

With the massive federal spending bill facing them, including funding for President Obama's controversial Affordable Care Act, House members return to Washington this week. The government would be forced to shut down if the continuing resolution providing the money is not passed by the beginning of next week.

Second district Kentucky Congressman Brett Guthrie appeared live on WKU Public Radio's Morning Edition Tuesday. In a wide-ranging interview, he told host Joe Corcoran the President is as much to blame for the political standoff in Washington as Republicans.

Joe Corcoran

The new WKU Health Sciences Complex at The Medical Center in Bowling Green will double the number of new nursing and physical therapy students graduating and entering the work force.

The first class of 80 nursing students begins classes Monday, Aug. 26.

WKU President Gary Ransdell told an audience at Thursday morning's official opening of the complex that as many as 360 students will be going through a variety of programs.

"This new building will house a bachelor's, master's, and a doctoral degree program in the WKU School of Nursing. And is will allow us to double the number of nursing students we accept every year, and the impact that will have on health care across our entire region is just profound," said Dr. Ransdell.

The first class of 30 students in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program began in June and just finished their first semester.

More than 120 miles of river habitat for an endangered fish are now under federal protection in Kentucky and West Virginia.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the protection of the diamond darter's habitat. The "critical habitat" designation includes 95 miles of the Green River in Edmonson, Green and Hart counties in Kentucky. It requires federal agencies to ensure that federally funded or permitted activities will not harm the darter or their habitat.

The diamond darter was protected under the Endangered Species Act last month. The tiny fish was considered extinct until scientists rediscovered it in West Virginia in 1980. Fewer than 125 of them have been seen over the past 30 years.

Pages