John Null

John Null, a native of Benton, KY, is a senior at Murray State University and newswriting intern at WKMS. He is majoring in journalism and minoring in film studies. John's goal is to become a magazine columnist, film critic or screenwriter. Neither a borrower nor a lender-be, John enjoys deductive reasoning, not owning animals and regaling friends with his Tracy Ross impression.

A decision on possible troop reductions at Fort Campbell has been pushed to the end of this month.

Katie Lopez at the Christian County Chamber of Commerce confirms that the chamber expected the decision to come down this week, but received word from the Army that it would be postponed until at least the middle of July.

One possibility mulled by the Department of Defense calls for 16,000 personnel cuts - about half of Fort Campbell’s current payroll. The expected cuts are a result of military budget constraints.

David Boyd, Sockeye Fire Information (Via Alaska Public Media)

Kentucky Division of Forestry firefighters are heading to Alaska to battle a number of wildfires.

The 16 full-time and 5 part-time firefighters will be joined by personnel from several federal agencies - including Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area - forming two 20-person crews.

Division of Forestry public information officer Jennifer Turner says the assignment is for 14 days. She says it was Kentucky’s turn on a rotation of southern states that answer calls for aid from the U.S. Forest Service.

“Tennessee, Virginia and Kentucky are up for the rotation to be called in if they need help and they called in yesterday and we’re sending help,” Turner said.

Kentucky’s firefighters are often called to aid other states this time of year. Turner says the commonwealth’s peak fire seasons are February 15-April 30 and October 1-December 15.

“So because of that, our firefighters are down in the summer time and that gives them the opportunity to be able to help out west when it’s their high fire season," Turner said.

Ft. Campbell

Local leaders around Fort Campbell are waiting for a decision by the end of this month regarding possible troop reductions at the base on the Kentucky/Tennessee border.

The Army is looking at cutting around 40,000 troops in total due to military budget constraints. One scenario called for as many 16,000 personnel cuts at Fort Campbell.

Katie Lopez is the director of military and governmental affairs at the Christian County Chamber of Commerce. She says she isn’t sure if recent efforts to fight the potential reduction through lobbying and community outreach will be successful.

“We do know that after our listening session in January, we did get a lot of great feedback from the Department of the Army,” Lopez said. “They were very impressed with our turnout and with our responses. So, I’m confident in saying that we made a really great impression on them.”

Lopez says she isn’t expecting the possible reductions to be on the high end of projections. She says an increase is even on the table when the decision comes down from the Department of Defense.

Lance Dennee/WKMS

The results are in from a biennial survey that asks Kentucky teachers about the state of teaching and learning in the commonwealth.

A record 89.3 percent of certified educators responded to the voluntary Teaching, Empowering, Leading and Learning (TELL) Survey, administered by the New Teacher Center.

Overall, the survey shows teachers are more positive than two years ago, with 87.9 percent of teachers calling their school a good place to work and learn. That’s compared to 85.2 percent in 2013.

Some of the topics included in the survey are time, school leadership, teacher leadership, facilities and resources, professional development, community engagement and student conduct.

“Time” was the least positive category in the survey, though it, too, showed improvement over 2013’s survey. Seventy-five percent of respondents said they feel there's enough instructional time to meet the needs of all students. That's up from 68.6 percent in 2013.

State Representative Richard Heath of Mayfield will seek a recanvass after narrowly losing his bid for theRepublican nomination for agriculture commissioner in Tuesday’s primary.

With more than 180,000 votes cast in the race, State Representative Ryan Quarles came out ahead of Heath by less than 1,000 votes. Jean-Marie Lawson Spann of Bowling Green was unopposed for the Democraticnomination for agriculture commissioner.

Incumbent commissioner Republican James Comer opted to run for governor rather than seek re-election.

John Null, WKMS

Kentucky State Police troopers are not using body cameras yet, but some western Kentucky law enforcement agencies have already embraced the technology.

The McCracken County Sheriff’s Department has been using body cameras for years. So has the Cadiz Police Department. But in March, all nine CPD officers got an upgrade with the latest TASER AXON body cameras. CPD Major Duncan Wiggins says the new cameras cost around $400 each.

“They have a wider view,” Wiggins said. “They also are a low-lux camera, which doesn’t mean they can see at night, but they see much like the human eye sees. So if a person is using a flashlight, it picks up really well. Also, the audio is impeccable.”

The cameras require a server to store the video that officers upload at the end of their shift. Wiggins said the server cost the city under $1,000.

CPD public information officer Scott Brown said that he’s a fan of the cameras.

A growing social media campaign is aimed at reopening an investigation into a car crash that killed a Hopkins County teenager earlier this year.

UPDATE: The bill's sponsor, state Sen. C.B. Embry tells Kentucky Public Radio the Senate will vote Friday on Senate Bill 76. The Fairness Campaign previously indicated the vote would be Thursday.

Director of Kentucky’s Fairness Campaign Chris Hartman says he anticipates the Republican-controlled Senate will pass a bill requiring students to use school bathrooms corresponding with their biological sex, but that it will stall in the Democrat-held state House of Representatives.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Facebook

Citing a need for docking locations on the Ohio River between Louisville and Paducah, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has awarded the city of Owensboro a $1.5 million grant toward the building of a new 500 foot dock for traveling boaters.

City attorney and assistant city manager Ed Ray says the intended location for the transient dock is in front of the city’s convention center.

TVA

With the National Weather Service calling for a low of 4 degrees Wednesday night, the Tennessee Valley Authority is preparing for power consumption levels comparable to last January when the utility saw record winter demand.

Spokesman Scott Brooks said TVA expects a demand load of 31,000-33,000 megawatts during the coldest part of this week. Brooks said the high demand could prompt TVA to invoke interruptible service contracts to cut power consumption.  

“That is always one of our options available to us," Brooks said. "We are under a conservative operations alert right now, which means we’re stopping any maintenance activities that might impact our generation for the next couple of days.”

Brooks said this scenario is a little different than last year because this arctic blast is relatively short compared to multiple days last winter where temperatures bottomed out in single digits.

TVA's generating capacity has not increased or decreased in any significant way since winter 2014, according to Brooks.

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