Joseph Lord

Joseph Lord is a Louisville native who was raised in Jeffersontown. He attended Western Kentucky University before covering public safety and later city government for The Anniston (Ala.) Star. He's also covered education for The Tribune and Evening News in southern Indiana and music and pop culture for Velocity, The Courier-Journal's weekly entertainment magazine. 

 
Most recently, Joseph has been a digital news reporter for The Courier-Journal.
 
Joseph, 32, and his wife, Brandy Warren, have two daughters and live in the St. Joseph neighborhood.

jlord@wfpl.org | Twitter

Kentucky LRC

The appointment of Kentucky’s top education official would be subject to state Senate confirmation under a bill pre-filed last week in the General Assembly.

State Rep. Kenny Imes, a Murray Republican, said he’s seeking to add accountability to the state’s education department.

“I think the public should have the right to have a voice in who is running our education system in Kentucky, along with their elected representatives,” he said. “The state by constitution is charged with providing the public education, and as such I just don’t think it ought to be totally run by KEA or any specific group.”

A spokesman for the Kentucky Education Association did not return an email request for comment on Monday.

The Kentucky education commissioner is appointed by the state Board of Education, which is appointed by the governor. Under current law, the Senate confirms the governor’s appointments to the education board, according to information provided by the Legislative Research Commission.

Last weekend, the state Board of Education interviewed a dozen candidates for the education commissioner post. The person chosen will replace the retiring Terry Holliday, the state education commissioner since 2009.

A report says Kentucky has among the highest percentages of children who have had three or more adverse experiences in their homes.

Those experiences include divorce, an incarcerated parent or substance abuse in their homes. And research suggests that those experiences can negatively affect children for years.

The Kids Count: First Eight Years report released Monday says 10 percent of Kentucky kids have experienced three or more of those factors.

That’s ties Montana for the highest percentage in the U.S.