Matt Markgraf

Matt "McG" Markgraf joined the WKMS News Team in January 2007, while pursuing his bachelorâââ

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A Kentucky Judge says he will decide this week whether to unseal the secret testimony from a former president of the company that markets the addictive painkiller OxyContin. 

Health website Statnews.com  says Pike County Circuit Judge Steven Combs made the comment Friday. The website is seeking to unseal some 17 million pages of Kentucky's lawsuit against Purdue Pharma. Chief among them is a deposition by Richard Sackler, a former company president and a member of the family that controls the company.

Kentucky sued Purdue Pharma in 2007, accusing the company of lying about the addictiveness of the drug. They settled the case in December for $24 million.

Purdue Pharma attorney Trevor Wells says the documents should stay hidden because they were never used as the basis for a court decision.

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, via Facebook

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency is adding confirmed cougar sightings to a new online map. The Cougar Action Team, or CAT, is a new agency working to organize evidence submitted by the public and developing a policy for dealing with this subspecies of cougar, which is not native to Tennessee. 

The first confirmed sighting in more than 100 years was in Obion County last September

Tennessee Wildlife Biologist Joy Sweaney says cougars are secretive animals and aren't typically a threat to humans. If you do encounter one, she recommends acting like 'the hardest prey to kill' and they will leave you alone.

DNA samples from hair found in the Carroll County location identified the animal as a western cougar subspecies similar to those found in South Dakota. She says there is possibly more than one cougar in Tennessee, expanding out from their home range. Western cougars have a range of 150 square miles and while it's rare to spot one, they are more commonly found in the Midwestern states.

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