Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith is a NPR White House Correspondent. She is especially focused on matters related to the economy and the Federal budget.

Prior to moving into her current role in January 2014, she was a Congressional Correspondent covering Congress with an emphasis on the budget, taxes and the ongoing fiscal fights. During the Republican presidential primaries she covered Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich in South Carolina, and traveled with Mitt Romney leading into the primaries in Colorado and Ohio, among other states. She began covering congress in August 2011.

Keith joined NPR in 2009 as a Business Reporter. In that role, she reported on topics spanning the business world from covering the debt downgrade and debt ceiling crisis to the latest in policy debates, legal issues and technology trends. In early 2010, she was on the ground in Haiti covering the aftermath of the country's disastrous earthquake and later she covered the oil spill in the Gulf. In 2011, Keith conceived and reported the 2011 NPR series The Road Back To Work, a year-long series featuring the audio diaries of six people in St. Louis who began the year unemployed and searching for work.

Keith has deep roots in public radio and got her start in news by writing and voicing essays for NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday as a teenager. While in college, she launched her career at NPR Member Station KQED's California Report, covering topics including agriculture and the environment. In 2004, Keith began working at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, where she reported on politics and the 2004 presidential campaign.

Keith went back to California to open the state capital bureau for NPR Member Station KPCC/Southern California Public Radio. In 2006, Keith returned to KQED, serving as the Sacramento-region reporter for two years.

In 2001, Keith began working on B-Side Radio, an hour-long public radio show and podcast that she co-founded, produced, hosted, edited, and distributed for nine years.

Over the course of her career Keith has been the recipient of numerous accolades, including an award for best news writing from the APTRA California/Nevada and a first place trophy from the Society of Environmental Journalists for "Outstanding Story Radio." Keith was a 2010-2011 National Press Foundation Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow.

Keith earned a bachelor's degree in Philosophy from University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree at the UCB Graduate School of Journalism. Tamara is also a member of the Bad News Babes, a media softball team that once a year competes against female members of Congress in the Congressional Women's Softball game.

Although Family Circle magazine's quadrennial presidential cookie competition sounds like it might have started with Mamie Eisenhower back in the 1950s, it actually got its start with Hillary Clinton.

Every presidential election cycle since 1992, the magazine has published a cookie recipe from the candidates' wives. The latest recipes were released Thursday morning, of course with a twist this year: Since Hillary Clinton is the first female nominee of a major party, it was her husband, Bill, who was asked to furnish a cookie recipe, along with Melania Trump.

Andrew Harnik/AP

Editor's note: NPR fact-checked Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's economic speech on Monday.

Trump delivered an address Monday to the Detroit Economic Club, outlining a plan to cut taxes and get rid of regulations. Today was Hillary Clinton's turn, where she argued that her plan would boost the middle class while Trump's plan "would give trillions in tax cuts to big corporations, millionaires, and Wall Street money managers."

Clinton spoke at Futuramic Tool & Engineering, an advanced manufacturing facility in Warren, Mich. Clinton has been talking about her jobs plan for weeks now, visiting factories and small business. Her address was meant as a contrast to Trump's dark vision of the state of American manufacturing and focus on coal and steel, industries that have been in steep decline for more than a generation.

As she's talked about the economy, Clinton has faced a couple of challenges; convincing white working class voters that she feels their pain and condensing her five point economic plan into something simple, catchy and satisfying.

Andrew Harnik/AP

A fresh batch of previously unreleased State Department emails are raising new questions about the relationship between the Clinton Foundation and the State Department during the years Hillary Clinton served as secretary of state.

The conservative group Judicial Watch released 296 pages of email conversations from Clinton's private email server that it says show that "Clinton's top aides' favors for and interactions with the Clinton Foundation seem in violation of the ethics agreements that Hillary Clinton agreed to in order to be appointed and confirmed as Secretary of State."

The group says 44 of those pages had not been previously turned over to the State Department.

Allegations that the Clinton Foundation, a global charitable organization created by former President Bill Clinton, worked to compensate donors by providing access at the State Department has cast a shadow over the current Democratic presidential nominee for years.

Among the 3,000 people Hillary Clinton drew to a rally in Florida last night was the father of the man responsible for killing 49 people at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando on June 12, according to a local news report.

A Clinton campaign official tells NPR that the rally in Kissimmee, Fla., on Monday was open to the public. NBC affiliate WPTV identified one attendee as Seddique Mateen, the father of Omar Mateen, who was killed in a shootout with police after carrying out the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

Evan Vucci/AP

Editor's note: NPR will also be fact-checking Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's planned economic speech this Thursday.

Donald Trump is coming off a week of disastrous headlines and cratering poll numbers. His major economic speech on Monday at the Detroit Economic Club, a vision described by his campaign as "Winning the Global Competition," was a chance to turn the page.

During an address of just over an hour — which was interrupted multiple times by protesters — the GOP presidential nominee unveiled a new iteration of his proposal to reshape America's tax system. It has just three tax brackets (one fewer than the tax plan he released in September, which was removed from his website in the past 24 hours), would limit taxes on all forms of business income to 15 percent, would end the estate tax and would "exclude childcare expenses from taxation."

Other highlights include a proposed moratorium on all new federal regulations and would "remove bureaucrats who only know how to kill jobs [and] replace them with experts who know how to create jobs," according to a preview released by his campaign. It's unclear exactly what that means or how it would work, but there are currently about 2.7 million civilian federal employees.

Editor's note: NPR will also be fact-checking Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's planned economic speech this Thursday.

Donald Trump is coming off a week of disastrous headlines and cratering poll numbers. His major economic speech on Monday at the Detroit Economic Club, a vision described by his campaign as "Winning the Global Competition," was a chance to turn the page.

There is an old stereotype about women in politics, one that was articulated by a man named Mark Rudolph back in 2008 on the Fox News Channel in an interview with Bill O'Reilly.

"You get a woman in the oval office, the most powerful person in the world, what's the downside?" O'Reilly asked.

Rudolph's answer: "You mean beside the PMS and the mood swings, right?"

Moments later he said he was joking. But for women in politics, questions or jokes about temperament are familiar.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Hillary Rodham's 1969 commencement address at Wellesley College did not stand out because of what she said.

It stood out because of how she said it, and because she said it at all. This is a story not about words, but about context.

Before 1969, Wellesley had never had a student speaker at commencement. Administrators spoke and special guests spoke, but students at this women's college didn't have a voice on graduation day.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages