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The award-winning news team at WKU Public Radio consists of Dan Modlin, Kevin Willis, Lisa Autry, and Joe Corcoran.

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Kevin Willis

4:12 p.m.:  The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet says major problem areas in the state include Hart and Rockcastle counties:

With nightfall quickly approaching, snow and ice crews will remain on the job for the rest of evening and into Saturday.

Today’s heavy snow storm dumped over 14 inches of snow in some parts of the state causing many delays, service disruption, impassable roadways and overturned semis along the interstates.  

The most problematic areas for traffic included I-65 near Hart County; I-75 in Rockcastle County and spots of U.S. 23 in Lawrence County.  Extra resources have been dedicated to clear these priority routes.

4:01 p.m.:  Truck driver Mike Edmonds has been stuck at a Kentucky truck stop all day as the snow piles up around him.

Edmonds told the Associated Press that the parking lot is so slick that vehicles spin out when trying to get back on Interstate 75 in Rockcastle County. And even if they leave the truck stop, they're stuck in traffic due to numerous wrecks in both directions.

Edmonds says he doesn't expect to get back on the road until Saturday. He's hauling a load of carpet to Michigan.

Rockcastle County has received a foot of snow, with higher accumulations possible.

Asked how he's spent his day, Edmonds replied: "Talking with the other drivers about how screwed up the weather is."

Lance Dennee / WKMS

Kentucky is preparing for the impending winter storm.

The National Weather Service has issued a winter storm warning for our listening area starting Thursday evening at 6 p.m. central time, and continuing through Saturday morning.

See the National Weather Service forecast for our region.

The wintry mix will begin late this evening with snow, sleet, and freezing rain.

Up to a quarter-of-an-inch of ice could form on roads and create dangerous driving conditions.

The mix will change completely to snow on Friday and the snow is expected to continue until Saturday morning.

Areas north of the Cumberland Parkway could get nine or more inches of snow.

South of the Cumberland Parkway near the Kentucky and Tennessee border will get four to six inches of snow.

“Over the next 48 hours, a major winter storm is expected to impact many regions of Kentucky— potentially causing ice-related damage, service interruption and impassable roadways,” said Governor Matt Bevin. “Our agencies are monitoring the conditions and coordinating communications with local officials and emergency personnel in preparation. Safety is our first priority; so it is very important to restrict travel to a minimum.”

Gusty winds of up to 25 miles-per-hour means there will be blowing and drifting snow, with poor visibility for driving.

The strong wind could also cause power outages in some areas.

At a specially called meeting Tuesday night, the Bowling Green Daily News reports Butler County magistrates approved Sheriff Scottie Ward's 2016 budget. The move enabled Butler County's five deputies to be paid and ended a week-long work stoppage that the sheriff called a strike.

The deputies stopped patrolling last week when fiscal court tabled approval of the sheriff's budget and it wasn't clear when their next paychecks would be issued.  State regulations require the money for that paycheck must come from the 2016 budget.

WBKO-TV reports Butler County Judge-Executive David Fields opened the meeting by apologizing for the way things were handled last week.

The sheriff's half million dollar budget was approved last night 4 - 1, with fiscal court voting to add about $192,000.

Magistrate David Whittinghill, who moved to table the sheriff's budget last week, voted against it. He was quoted as saying the sheriff's department already gets enough money, including what the county pays in.

After Butler County Sheriff Scottie Ward's budget was tabled until December 28 by the county's fiscal court Monday night, Ward said all his deputies will be on strike until a budget is approved. In a Facebook posting after the meeting, Ward wrote, "I'm truly sorry but I can't force my guys to put their life on the line for no money."

Ward said he gave each court member a copy of his budget to look over November 10th. But after an hour of questioning, a motion was made by court member David Whittinghill to table the document. Sheriff Ward called the meeting "a circus".

The sheriff's office will remain open to collect taxes and for court security.

Ward said he cut his budget five thousand dollars from last year and, still, no one in his department got a raise while all other Butler County employees got a 2% raise.

The sheriff, in a separate posting, also listed the home phone numbers for all fiscal court members and urged residents to call them to support the sheriff's department.

A Bowling Green man wanted on drug and escape charges, and for dragging a Bowling Green city officer in his vehicle during an attempted arrest, was captured with two other men Sunday afternoon.

A.C. Barnes and two other men were found in an apartment on McIntosh Street just off Campbell Lane in the city.

Police received a tip Barnes was in the apartment building.

They began negotiating with him to surrender just after 3:00 p.m. using a public address system. After a little more than an hour, the BGPD’s Critical Response Team ignited a so-called “flash-bang” explosive to disorient the men and they stormed the building.  

There were no injuries reported during the capture.

Police had been looking for Barnes since his October 13th attempted arrest on outstanding drug charges. That’s when Barnes fled in his vehicle dragging the city police officer with his for a short distance. Police fired at least two shots at him then.

Barnes had a large bandage on his back at the time of Sunday’s arrest but it’s not known if that was due to the gunshots.

Somerset businessman Michael Keck is joining the race to replace outgoing state senator Chris Girdler in the 15th District senate seat in Pulaski, Lincoln and Boyle Counties.

Keck is a Somerset High School and WKU graduate who now works as a business broker for a local financial group helping to facilitate the buying and selling of companies.

He says he’s running because of what he sees as the untapped economic potential of Kentucky. He’ll be running on a platform of job creation and tax reform.

Keck joins local insurance agents Don Moss and Rick Girdler and Somerset optometrist Dr. Joshua Nichols in the race for the 15th district senate seat.

National Corvette Museum

The head of the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green is being recognized for growing the Museum’s membership and guiding it through the aftermath of last year’s sink-hole collapse.

Wendell Strode is one of three Kentucky Nonprofit Network award winners…he’ll receive the Distinguished Nonprofit Leadership Award at a ceremony in Lexington October 28th.

The awards committee noted Strode’s efforts to grow the museum’s membership and visitors resulted in a 35-million dollar economic impact to the local and state economy.

He’s also being recognized for using the collapse of the floor in the Museum’s Skydome  as an opportunity to attract world-wide media attention and setting record museum attendance during repairs.

A semi crash occurred Friday morning near Mile Point 70 in the southbound lanes of I-65 in Hart County.  The vehicle came to rest behind guardrail and is over an embankment of the construction zone.

According to the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, emergency crews are attempting to keep one interstate lane open as much as possible but intermittent full closures will be necessary.

The Exit 71 Southbound on-ramp is restricted to emergency vehicles only.      

It is expected to take several hours to clear the scene.

Motorists traveling through should consider using Exit 91 to the Western Kentucky Parkway and Natcher Parkway as a route to re-join I-65 in Bowling Green.

Motorists needing local access should consider US 31W.

Kentucky State Police say a 5-year-old boy has been fatally struck by a school bus in Butler County.

State police spokesman B.J. Eaton said that police were called around 3:20 p.m. CDT Monday to the scene on Kentucky 70 about four miles west of Morgantown.

Eaton says the child was hit at his scheduled stop after the Butler County school bus stopped in front of a residence to let children exit.

Butler County Coroner Marty Jones says the child was pronounced dead about 15 minutes later. The boy was identified as five year old Jayden Hawkins of Morgantown.

A statement from Butler County schools said the driver of the school bus has been employed by the school system for 18 years and has "an exemplary driving record with the district."

The Kentucky State Trooper killed in a Sunday night shooting on I-24 in Lyon County was a Hardin County native who will be buried Friday at the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery in Radcliff.

31 year old Trooper Joseph Cameron Ponder died at a hospital in Princeton, KY just hours after being shot during a routine traffic stop that turned tragic. The suspect, Joseph Johnson-Shanks of Missouri was shot and killed by police after an hours-long search.

Ponder had just graduated from the State Police Academy in January. He was in the process of transferring back home from the State Police Post in Mayfield to the one in Elizabethtown.

Trooper Ponder was a 2002 graduate of North Hardin High School where he won all-state honors in track. He turned down a track scholarship from WKU to enlist in the Navy instead.

Ponder's body was transported to Coffey and Chism Funeral Home in Vine Grove Monday following an autopsy in Louisville. A KSP Trooper will stand guard by the casket 24 hours a day until his burial Friday.

Funeral services will be held at 11:00 Friday morning at Severns Valley Baptist Church in Elizabethtown. Burial with full military honors will follow at the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery in Radcliff.

Ryland Barton

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis will be released from an Eastern Kentucky jail, provided she does not interfere with the issuance of marriage licenses by her deputies.

U.S. District Judge David Bunning ordered Davis into the custody of U.S. Marshals on Thursday. Davis had refused to issue marriage licenses since the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage in June. She’s said issuing the documents to same-sex couples violates her deeply held religious beliefs.

Last month, Bunning ordered Davis to resume issuing marriage licenses, but she remained defiant. Several of the deputy clerks in her office began issuing marriage licenses to all couples on Friday.

On Tuesday, Bunning ordered Davis to be released from the Carter County Detention Center. But he wrote that she could not interfere with her deputy clerks issuing the documents.

Davis’ fight against same-sex marriage has drawn national attention to the small towns of Grayson — where she was jailed — and Morehead, where she works.

On Tuesday, Republican presidential candidates Mike Huckabee and Ted Cruz were expected in Grayson.

Matt Bevin, the Republican candidate for governor, has also planned a visit.

A federal judge ordered that Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis be taken into custody on Thursday over her refusal to issue marriage licenses despite a court order.

Kentucky Public Radio’s Ryland Barton reports:

We’ll have more soon.

Pulaski County state senator Chris Girdler wants to change time.

The Somerset republican wants all Kentucky counties bordering Lake Cumberland to be in the Eastern time zone to better accommodate tourism.

The Somerset “Commonwealth Journal” reports Girdler sent a letter to officials in a six county region wanting Clinton, Cumberland and Russell Counties to leave the Central time zone and join Pulaski, McCreary and Wayne counties in moving an hour ahead.

Wayne County made the switch just a few years ago.

Girdler says most of the population around Lake Cumberland is already in the Eastern time zone, as is Kentucky’s largest city, Louisville.

He says having all the counties within the same time zone would improve promotion of Lake Cumberland and the interaction among the counties.

Another southern Indiana county might declare a state of emergency over increasing rates of HIV and hepatitis C.

Clark County, which is just across the Ohio River from Louisville, is considering the move in light of the recent outbreak in neighboring Scott County.

Scott County, Indiana, has received national attention recently following a spike in HIV and hep-C, blamed on the use of dirty needles used by addicts who are injecting heroin and the painkiller opana.

The Courier-Journal reports Clark County public health officer Kevin Burke is considering declaring a public emergency after it was discovered that a current HIV case in his county was linked to the Scott County outbreak. A public emergency would allow the creation of a needle exchange program, something proponents say is necessary to slow the spread of disease and offer treatment options to addicts.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Tom Frieden says the 4,200 person town of Austin, in Scott County, has a higher per-capita rate of HIV infection than any country in sub-saharan Africa.

The wife of a deceased Somerset attorney is suing several psychiatrists and Eastern State Hospital. 

Beth Stanziano claims they were negligent in their handling of a mentally ill man who murdered her husband, according to a report in the Lexington Herald-Leader.

The complaint says 41-year-old Clinton Inabnit had been treated at Eastern State for several days in May 2014.  The following month, he shot and killed Somerset attorney Mark Staniziano. 

The lawsuit claims Inabnit was released from the mental hospital while still delusional.  He suffered from paranoid schizophrenia and had a criminal record. 

The lawsuit filed by Stanziano’s widow claims Inabnit had made prior threats to harm the prominent attorney and that doctors failed in their responsibility to warn Stanziano or notify police. 

Inabnit was scheduled to go on trial this month.  Instead, he pleaded guilty but mentall ill on charges of murder and wanton endangerment.  The plea agreement calls for a 20-year sentence.

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