Andy Beshear

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A judge says Attorney General Andy Beshear’s fourth lawsuit against Gov. Matt Bevin can proceed, recognizing that any ruling in the case will likely be appealed.

This particular challenge deals with Bevin’s executive order from earlier this summer that reorganized several education boards using a little-known state law. This law has also been used by previous governors but never challenged in court.

Franklin Circuit Court Judge Thomas Wingate converted Bevin’s request to dismiss the case into a motion for summary judgement, meaning the challenge won’t go to trial and will have an expedited ruling.

Kentucky's Top Elected Officials Prepare to Meet in Court

Aug 9, 2017
J. Tyler Franklin

Two of Kentucky's most bitter rivals will meet in court twice over the next 10 days in legal battles that could help shape the state's future in both politics and policy.

Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear has sued Republican Gov. Matt Bevin four times over his use of executive orders to reshape state government. Beshear has been victorious in one of those lawsuits, while the others are still pending.

On Wednesday, Bevin's attorneys will ask a judge to dismiss the latest lawsuit that challenges the governor's order to remake several boards that govern public education.

Beshear, Adkins Use Fancy Farm as Test for 2019

Aug 6, 2017
Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Andy Beshear says he has not decided if he will run for governor in 2019, but his tax returns tell a different story.

Kentucky's Democratic attorney general publicly released his 2016 tax returns on statewide television Saturday during the 137th annual Fancy Farm picnic. And while he challenged the state's other lawmakers to do the same, most saw it as a challenge to Republican Gov. Matt Bevin, who has steadfastly refused to release his income tax returns despite years of precedent.

Ryland Barton

The Fancy Farm Picnic kicks off Saturday in Graves County in far-west Kentucky. The annual political speaking event takes place in the afternoon, drawing politicians and barbecue lovers from around the state.

Before a Democratic dinner Friday evening, Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear stoked the flames of an ongoing feud with Republican Gov. Matt Bevin.

Beshear said he had alerted federal authorities about a house Bevin purchased from a political donor and state contractor.

J. Tyler Franklin

The Executive Branch Ethics Commission says that if Attorney General Andy Beshear plans on running for governor in 2019, he shouldn’t investigate allegations that Gov. Matt Bevin used his office to get a deal on a mansion he bought earlier this year.

But the state ethics agency also issued an advisory opinion saying that Beshear could request a third-party investigator to look into the governor’s transaction.

Creative Commons

Robert Stivers, the president of the Kentucky State Senate, said he’ll ask to intervene in a legal challenge against OxyContin manufacturer Purdue Pharma in order to release documents that deal with a settlement the company made with the state in late 2015.

Stivers, a Republican from Manchester, suggested the case was improperly settled by former Democratic Attorney General Jack Conway, saying the $24 million windfall amounted to “pennies on the dollar” of what the state could have gotten.

Public Domain

Attorney General Andy Beshear has announced he is suing Gov. Matt Bevin over a recent executive order that reorganized several education boards.

The announcement comes after the attorney general previously threatened to sue Bevin over the actions and after the governor changed his executive order late last week.

Beshear said that despite Bevin’s changes, “there are still significant constitutional and legal violations.”

Kentucky Supreme Court to Hear U of L Case in August

Jun 20, 2017
J. Tyler Franklin

The Kentucky Supreme Court has scheduled a hearing in a lawsuit pitting the Republican governor against the state's Democratic attorney general.

The court will hear arguments on Aug. 18 about whether Gov. Matt Bevin has the authority to abolish and replace the boards of trustees at public universities.

Last year, Bevin abolished the board of trustees at the University of Louisville and replaced it with a new board. Attorney General Andy Beshear sued, arguing Bevin's order was illegal. A state judge agreed with him, and Bevin appealed.

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Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear will be back in court soon as the Kentucky Supreme Court weighs in on whether the governor’s attempted overhaul of the University of Louisville trustee board last summer was legal.

A trial court ruled last year that Bevin didn’t have the authority to remove members or abolish state university boards. The governor appealed the decision and the legislature passed a law giving the governor broader powers to retool university boards.

Beshear has characterized Bevin’s actions as a “power grab.”

Ryland Barton

Attorney General Andy Beshear said he’ll wait to decide whether to file a lawsuit against Gov. Matt Bevin over a recent reorganization of several state education boards.

The governor’s office sent Beshear a letter late Wednesday saying Bevin planned to alter the executive order, which tweaked or replaced panels like the Board of Education and Council on Postsecondary Education.

Beshear argues the reorganizations go against the state’s laws and constitution, and said he would take legal action if Bevin didn’t alter the executive order by Friday.

J. Tyler Franklin

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear says his office needs more information in determining whether criminal activity occurred at the University of Louisville Foundation.

Beshear told reporters Monday that an audit found “gross mismanagement” at the foundation — the nonprofit investment arm of the university. He said more information is needed to know if that mismanagement “crossed the line into criminal” activity.

Beshear said his office would have jurisdiction if state dollars were taken or nonprofit rules were violated.

Kentucky Attorney General Threatens to Sue Governor Again

Jun 7, 2017

Kentucky's Democratic attorney general has threatened to sue the state's Republican governor for a fourth time.

In a news conference Wednesday, Andy Beshear said Gov. Matt Bevin's executive order last week that dissolved and reorganized several state education boards was unconstitutional.

Friday, Bevin eliminated state boards that set curriculum standards and certify public school teachers. He then re-created the boards with new members.

Ryland Barton

Kentucky’s attorney general is continuing criticism of Gov. Matt Bevin’s purchase of a mansion in suburban Louisville.

The Courier-Journal first reported that Bevin and his family moved into an estate in Anchorage that was previously owned by a political donor appointed by the governor to the Kentucky Retirement Systems board.

The Bevins seemingly got a more than a $1 million discount on the home compared to the county’s official property estimate.

Attorney General Andy Beshear said during a news conference on Tuesday that there “continues to be a lot of smoke” stemming from the issue.

J. Tyler Franklin

Attorney General Andy Beshear says he’s exploring whether his office has the authority to investigate if Gov. Matt Bevin improperly bought a house from a political appointee and got a discount.

Beshear said he’s asked the Executive Branch Ethics Commission to weigh in on whether his office should investigate.

“I have real serious concerns about what’s going on in the Bevin administration and whether we’re seeing one of the worst cases of unjust enrichment or personal enrichment by a governor that I can imagine,” Beshear said on Tuesday to Terry Meiners on WHAS.

Kentucky's attorney general is asking a court to deny Western Kentucky University’s request for a stay in its lawsuit against the campus newspaper. 

WKU is suing the College Heights Herald after the school denied the newspaper's open records request for documents related to sexual misconduct investigations involving university employees.  The university maintains the records are not subject to disclosure under the Kentucky Open Records Act.

WKU is asking for a stay until a similar case is resolved involving the University of Kentucky and its student newspaper, the Kentucky Kernel.

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