Andy Beshear

Public Domain

Attorney General Andy Beshear has announced he is suing Gov. Matt Bevin over a recent executive order that reorganized several education boards.

The announcement comes after the attorney general previously threatened to sue Bevin over the actions and after the governor changed his executive order late last week.

Beshear said that despite Bevin’s changes, “there are still significant constitutional and legal violations.”

Kentucky Supreme Court to Hear U of L Case in August

Jun 20, 2017
J. Tyler Franklin

The Kentucky Supreme Court has scheduled a hearing in a lawsuit pitting the Republican governor against the state's Democratic attorney general.

The court will hear arguments on Aug. 18 about whether Gov. Matt Bevin has the authority to abolish and replace the boards of trustees at public universities.

Last year, Bevin abolished the board of trustees at the University of Louisville and replaced it with a new board. Attorney General Andy Beshear sued, arguing Bevin's order was illegal. A state judge agreed with him, and Bevin appealed.

Creative Commons

Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear will be back in court soon as the Kentucky Supreme Court weighs in on whether the governor’s attempted overhaul of the University of Louisville trustee board last summer was legal.

A trial court ruled last year that Bevin didn’t have the authority to remove members or abolish state university boards. The governor appealed the decision and the legislature passed a law giving the governor broader powers to retool university boards.

Beshear has characterized Bevin’s actions as a “power grab.”

Ryland Barton

Attorney General Andy Beshear said he’ll wait to decide whether to file a lawsuit against Gov. Matt Bevin over a recent reorganization of several state education boards.

The governor’s office sent Beshear a letter late Wednesday saying Bevin planned to alter the executive order, which tweaked or replaced panels like the Board of Education and Council on Postsecondary Education.

Beshear argues the reorganizations go against the state’s laws and constitution, and said he would take legal action if Bevin didn’t alter the executive order by Friday.

J. Tyler Franklin

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear says his office needs more information in determining whether criminal activity occurred at the University of Louisville Foundation.

Beshear told reporters Monday that an audit found “gross mismanagement” at the foundation — the nonprofit investment arm of the university. He said more information is needed to know if that mismanagement “crossed the line into criminal” activity.

Beshear said his office would have jurisdiction if state dollars were taken or nonprofit rules were violated.

Kentucky Attorney General Threatens to Sue Governor Again

Jun 7, 2017

Kentucky's Democratic attorney general has threatened to sue the state's Republican governor for a fourth time.

In a news conference Wednesday, Andy Beshear said Gov. Matt Bevin's executive order last week that dissolved and reorganized several state education boards was unconstitutional.

Friday, Bevin eliminated state boards that set curriculum standards and certify public school teachers. He then re-created the boards with new members.

Ryland Barton

Kentucky’s attorney general is continuing criticism of Gov. Matt Bevin’s purchase of a mansion in suburban Louisville.

The Courier-Journal first reported that Bevin and his family moved into an estate in Anchorage that was previously owned by a political donor appointed by the governor to the Kentucky Retirement Systems board.

The Bevins seemingly got a more than a $1 million discount on the home compared to the county’s official property estimate.

Attorney General Andy Beshear said during a news conference on Tuesday that there “continues to be a lot of smoke” stemming from the issue.

J. Tyler Franklin

Attorney General Andy Beshear says he’s exploring whether his office has the authority to investigate if Gov. Matt Bevin improperly bought a house from a political appointee and got a discount.

Beshear said he’s asked the Executive Branch Ethics Commission to weigh in on whether his office should investigate.

“I have real serious concerns about what’s going on in the Bevin administration and whether we’re seeing one of the worst cases of unjust enrichment or personal enrichment by a governor that I can imagine,” Beshear said on Tuesday to Terry Meiners on WHAS.

Kentucky's attorney general is asking a court to deny Western Kentucky University’s request for a stay in its lawsuit against the campus newspaper. 

WKU is suing the College Heights Herald after the school denied the newspaper's open records request for documents related to sexual misconduct investigations involving university employees.  The university maintains the records are not subject to disclosure under the Kentucky Open Records Act.

WKU is asking for a stay until a similar case is resolved involving the University of Kentucky and its student newspaper, the Kentucky Kernel.

Thinkstock

Attorney General Andy Beshear’s office has appealed a judge’s ruling that wiped decades-old convictions from a Kentuckian’s criminal record, arguing they aren’t eligible under the state’s new felony expungement law.

The case hinges on whether crimes committed over a series of days are considered to be part of the same “incident” and are thus all eligible for expungement.

The new law allows people to have certain class D felonies cleared if — after completing their sentences — they stay out of trouble for five years and pay a $500 fee.

J. Tyler Franklin

Attorney General Andy Beshear still hasn’t returned contributions made to his 2015 campaign by a former top aide who admitted to taking bribes and is now serving time in federal prison.

Beshear announced last year that he would donate the funds to political watchdog group Common Cause once a routine audit of his campaign account is complete.

The Kentucky Registry for Election Finance confirmed Monday that the audit is still not complete.

Tim Longmeyer was Beshear’s deputy attorney general and last year admitted taking more than $212,000 from a consulting firm in exchange for awarding state contracts to the firm.

Ryland Barton

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear's office says training sessions planned this month will focus on the backlog of sexual assault forensic evidence kits.

The three-day training sessions are for law enforcement, prosecutors and victim advocates. The sessions are set for April 11-13 at the Embassy Suites in Lexington.

Beshear says prosecutors have requested the training to help them prosecute cases from the backlog of sexual assault evidence kits. Beshear's office says the training is another step toward helping sexual assault victims receive justice.

Warren County Commonwealth's Attorney Chris Cohron says the training will be invaluable for prosecutors across Kentucky.

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

During a contentious committee hearing late Wednesday night, Republican lawmakers advanced a bill that would limit the powers of the state attorney general’s office.

Attorney General Andy Beshear, a Democrat, called the proposal “silly and unfortunate legislation” and accused lawmakers of trying to give Gov. Matt Bevin more power at the expense of his office.

“This comes at a very high price, simply for a power grab,” Beshear said.

Under the legislation, the attorney general would no longer be able to file an amicus curiae, or “friend of the court,” brief on behalf of the state.

David Brinkley

Kentucky is making progress in addressing a backlog of untested rape kits.  A 2015 audit revealed the commonwealth had more than three-thousand untested kits, which include physical evidence collected from sexual assault victims. 

Attorney General Andy Beshear says about 1,500 of those kits have now been examined and the DNA entered into a national crime database.

"We have active investigations going on right now," Beshear told WKU Public Radio.  "The hits suggests there is at least one serial rapist that has been identified and this is an absolute critical step that we are going to follow through with until every single victim has their kit tested."

Kentucky Senate Scales Back Attorney General Bill

Mar 15, 2017
LRC Public Information

A bill that would take away some powers from the attorney general and give them to the governor likely will not pass this session.

Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Whitney Westerfield said he will not consider a proposal that would give the governor the exclusive authority to represent the state in some civil lawsuits. Instead, he said the Senate will likely consider a bill later this month to let the governor represent the state in a lawsuit only if the attorney general declines to do so.

Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear has said he will not defend a recently enacted law that bans all abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. He is defending a law requiring women seeking an abortion to first receive an ultrasound, but Republicans have criticized him for not offering a more robust defense.

Pages