Arts & Culture

Green River Area Development District

The small community of Rosine in Ohio County now has high-speed Internet thanks to a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The new service has led to the creation of a community Internet center and is even connecting to the father of bluegrass music.

Rosine is the home of Bill Monroe, the father of bluegrass music, and a museum in his honor is under construction. Now the new museum will be able to have high-speed Internet. It’s one of the bonuses for Rosine that comes along with an $800,000 grant from the USDA’s Rural Utilities Service. The grant was awarded to the Evansville-based company Q-Wireless. 

Bryan Lemon/WKU

Devon Gilfillian and 8 Track Love were the featured musicians at Lost River Sessions LIVE on Oct. 19 at the Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green. The show came just days before Gilfillian inked a deal with Capitol Records. 

WKU Theater

WKU theater faculty member Scott Stroot and junior Jada Jefferson discuss the play Mother Courage by Bertolt Brecht. The play runs through Nov. 7 at the Russel H. Miller Theater on the WKU Campus. 

Veterans Upward Bound at WKU

It’s a week before the official Veterans Day holiday, but Bowling Green will honor those who have served in the military with a parade on Saturday, Nov. 4. The parade is scheduled so it doesn’t interfere with other activities by local veterans groups on Nov. 11.

One group coming out in force for the parade is Veteran’s Upward Bound. The organization is based at Western Kentucky University and helps veterans get into college and succeed in their studies.

Davy Stone is director of Veterans Upward Bound at WKU. He said the parade might inspire some veterans to go back to school.

Lost River Sessions

10 String Symphony - the combination of Rachel Baiman and Christian Sedelmyer plays on this edition of Lost River Sessions radio. Their performance was captured at Loving Chapel Stables in Franklin, Kentucky.

In the second half of our show - the deeply introspective songs of Nashville singer-songwriter Carl Anderson. His set was recorded at Van Meter Hall on the campus of Western Kentucky University.  

Clinton Lewis/WKU

Misty Mountain String Band joined organist Ken Stein for the latest installment of the Stained Glass Series. This concert was recorded on Sept. 26 at St. Joseph's Catholic Church. 

Stein is organist/choir master at Christ Episcopal Church in Bowling Green. He's also a member of the WKU Department of Music faculty. 

Misty Mountain String Band, based in Louisville, is composed of Neal Green on fiddle, Derek Harris on bass, Paul Martin on banjo and mandolin and Brian Vickers on guitar. 

Human Rights Campaign

Kentucky has one city – Louisville - that earned top-ranking in a new report on towns that support lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender members of the community. Bowling Green was at the bottom.

The “Municipal Equality Index,” published by the Human Rights Campaign, grades cities on a scale of 1-to-100, based on issues like non- discrimination laws in employment and housing. The index also includes grades for the relationship city officials and police have with LGBTQ individuals.

Decades before NFL player Colin Kaepernick took a knee during the national anthem to protest police treatment of African-Americans, boxer Muhammad Ali roiled white America with his 1967 resistance to the Vietnam War draft.

The boxer had converted to the Nation of Islam a few years earlier, and he explained his resistance to the war by saying, "I ain't got no quarrel with them Viet Cong."

Emil Moffatt

Sound the Trumpets is a special concert featuring Southern Kentucky Brass and organist Ken Stein. It was recorded in June 2017 at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Bowling Green as part of the Stained Glass Music Series. The emcee for this concert was Barbara Deeb from WKU Public Radio. 

The Stained Glass Music Series is made possible thanks to St. Joseph’s Catholic Church and its parishioners. Support also comes from Lynn and Dennis O’Keefe, and the listeners of WKU Public Radio. Our sound engineers for this recording were Don Eastman and Sam Holiday.
 

Karly Caldwell

The “Radium Girls” were a group of young women who, nearly a century ago, unknowingly put their lives at risk working in factories where they painted watch faces with radium.

Now, a production by the Department of Theater and Dance at WKU, explores their story and how they sought justice in a play called “These Shining Lives”.

“This actually took place in a few different places; there were a few different companies, this is the story of the women in Ottawa, Illinois who were able to successfully sue the company and help change laws in terms of worker protection,” said Dr. Michelle Dvoskin, assistant professor for WKU's department of theater and dance. 

WalletHub

The U.S. is in a state of uncertainty – and controversy– with impending changes on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, in the next few months. Immigration and diversity are ‘hot-button’ issues.

A new survey on diversity by the consumer website WalletHub found Kentucky near the bottom of rankings.   

WalletHub based its state-by-state rankings on diversity across several metrics, including household income, educational level, race, language, religion and variety of industries.  Kentucky came in at number 45 in the overall ranking of the most diverse states in America.

Lost River Sessions

Singer-songwriter Dana Sipos and her band performed for Lost River Sessions at Lost River Cave in Bowling Green. Sipos, along with bandmates Ben Hermann and Ben Cook took turns on lead vocals during the set. They were also joined by Brody Wellman. 

In the second half of our show, we feature Mark Whitley, a musician and woodworker from Smiths Grove, Kentucky. His solo set was recorded at the Brickyard Cafe in Franklin. 

Lake Cumberland Slaves Memorial

A Pulaski County memorial to slaves buried in unmarked graves is moving forward with a grant and some media attention.

The Lake Cumberland Slaves Memorial began as a response to the murder of nine African-Americans by a white supremacist during a Bible study in a Charleston, South Carolina church in 2015.

The memorial has been awarded a $1,000 grant from the Puffin Foundation, an organization that funds art projects often excluded from mainstream grants because of race, gender or social philosophy.


Daviess County Animal Shelter

The Daviess County Animal Shelter has declared a “code red.”  That means the shelter is stepping up efforts to reduce the number of animals so it doesn’t have to euthanize healthy, adoptable pets.

There are currently 69 dogs, 83 cats and four rabbits.

Shelter Director Ashley Clark says there are several ways to avoid unnecessary euthanization.

“If we could have rescues and fosters and adopters to come in and help with the animals, it’s not going to one avenue that solves the problem. You know, we can’t adopt our way out of it, and we can’t foster our way out of it.”

Flickr/Creative Commons

The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum is opening an exhibit on the life and career of Hall of Famer Loretta Lynn in Nashville this month.

"Loretta Lynn: Blue Kentucky Girl" opens Aug. 25 and runs through Aug. 5, 2018.

The museum said in a news release that highlights include Lynn's original handwritten manuscript for her 1970 hit, "Coal Miner's Daughter"; the microphone used at her first recording session; some of her dresses; and the sewing machine she used to make her early stage clothes.

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