Arts & Culture

Arts & Culture
5:51 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Owensboro Looking to Become Part of Americana Music Triangle

Credit City of Owensboro, KY

Owensboro is shooting to become the northernmost point on the Americana Music Triangle looking to join other cities on the 1,500 mile trail that includes nine music genres.

Currently, New Orleans serves as the southern point while the northern points include the Tennessee cities of Memphis and Nashville.

Aubrey Preston and the Franklin, Tennessee based Americana Music Association created the trail and recently visited Owensboro to discuss with local officials the possibility of including it.

The city's become a hub for bluegrass music and tourism. It's home to the International Bluegrass Music Museum and holds and annual bluegrass festival, the River of Music Party or ROMP, that draws about 20,000 people.

Arts & Culture
2:49 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Hines Book Documents Bowling Green-Native's Influence On The Way America Eats On the Go

Duncan Hines exhibit at the Kentucky Museum on the campus of WKU
Abbey Oldham/WKU Public Radio

Louis Hatchett was a graduate student in search of a master’s thesis when he came upon a book called “Adventures in Good Eating”.  The author was Duncan Hines and the book would transform the course of Hatchett’s professional life.

“Duncan Hines is probably a kindred spirit,” said Hatchett. “When I read that he would travel from Chicago to Detroit for lunch, I said ‘this man is just like me’, because I’ve traveled 200 miles to eat a steak and gone back home the same day.”

We visited recently with Hatchett at the Duncan Hines Exhibit at the Kentucky Museum on the WKU campus.

After compiling reams of research, the Henderson, Kentucky author eventually produced a 750-page manuscript.  He whittled the content down to 75 pages for his thesis and 300 pages for a book called “Duncan Hines: How a Traveling Salesman Became the Most Trusted Name in Food”.  The book was originally published under a slightly different title in 2001, but was republished this spring.   

In the book, Hatchett contends that Hines created a revolution when it came to roadside dining. He says more people died from food poisoning in the 1930s along American roadways than they did in car accidents.   

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Arts & Culture
11:49 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Danville's 'Great American Brass Band Festival' Turns 25

Credit Great American Brass Band Festival

The Great American Brass Band Festival celebrates its 25th anniversary this weekend in Danville.  Brass band music fans from around the world are expected to descend upon the town for the event.

“The best brass bands play on our stages – it’s quite an honor for them to do so. And so we bring the best of the best, and I think that’s part of why we’ve survived for 25 years and we intend to be around for many more, ” said executive director Niki Kinkade.

Kinkade says the event is expected to draw 30,000 people this weekend.

“It’s very much a community driven festival, we are basically financially supported by our community and through volunteerism and through all sorts of different activities that go on over the four-day weekend," said Kinkade. "The entire community comes together and helps to put this event on.”

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Arts & Culture
1:15 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Wet Forecast Leads Organizers to Cancel Music Festival

The forecast for rain this weekend has led to the cancelation of the Stucky Music Festival set for Saturday near the Corvette Museum in Bowling Green.

Thirteen bands had been scheduled to play throughout the day Saturday. Organizers say tickets purchased online have already been refunded, while those who purchased them in person will need to return them for a refund.

The event will not be re-scheduled.

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Arts & Culture
2:04 pm
Fri May 2, 2014

Kentucky Inducts Hunter S. Thompson Into Its Journalism Hall Of Fame

In this undated image, Hunter S. Thompson is shown in a promotional photo from the film, "Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson." (Magnolia Pictures via AP)

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 1:44 pm

The Kentucky Derby will be run this Saturday in Louisville. The thoroughbred horse race, now 140 years old, is one of the country’s legendary sporting events, but it also played a major role in spawning a new kind writing style, created by another Louisville product, the late Hunter S. Thompson.

As Rick Howlett of Here & Now contributing station WFPL in Louisville reports, there’s a new appreciation for the founder of Gonzo journalism in his native city and state.

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Arts & Culture
3:48 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

2014 SOKY Book Festival to Feature Nearly 150 Authors

The 2014 SOKY Book Fest is Saturday, April 26.
Credit Southern Kentucky Book Fest

An organizer of an upcoming book festival in Bowling Green says it’s becoming more of a challenge to get authors at larger publishers to appear at events for free.

Kristie Lowry is literary outreach coordinator with WKU Libraries, and an organizer with the Southern Kentucky Book Festival. She says book companies have cut their budgets related to book tours and marketing campaigns.

“So getting the authors to come to an event like ours for free, which would have been a little easier back in the day, is harder to do now,” Lowry told WKU Public Radio. “And Penguin and Random House have their own speaker bureaus now, so they market their authors, but you have to pay a fee in order to have them come into town.”

Lowry says another growing trend in the literary world is the rising number of self-published authors. She says many self-published writers in the southern Kentucky region, like Allison Jewell and Jennie Brown, have loyal followings and are well-received when they appear on panels at local book festivals.

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Arts & Culture
7:03 pm
Sun April 13, 2014

Owensboro Native, Elizabethtown Resident Continues Making Waves in Opera World

Owensboro native Anthony Clark Evans is one of five nationwide winners of the prestigious Sarah Tucker Study Grant
Credit Anthony Clark Evans

The rise to prominence in the opera world continues for an Owensboro native.

Last week, Anthony Clark Evans was named a winner of the Sarah Tucker Study Grant from the Richard Tucker Music foundation. Evans is one of only five young opera singers nationwide to win the $5,000 award this year. The audition for the grant was by invitation only.

“What it really means to me, is that I’m able to maybe make a few extra trips here and there and audition for more people because I’ll have a little bit of extra cash just sitting in the bank,” said Evans.  “I’ll be able to maybe take a flight out to New York again to sing for somebody that’s important out there.”

The  28-year-old baritone now resides in Elizabethtown but is currently studying at the Ryan Center of Lyric Opera in Chicago. He says he comes from a long line of singers.

“It really comes from my father. He was a trained singer and his father was a trained singer. I think it goes back four or five generations,” said Evans.

He studied voice at Murray State, but left school twice to save up more money to continue his education. The second time away, he got married and the couple settled in Elizabethtown where he took a job at a car dealership. 

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Arts & Culture
10:52 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Everly Brothers 1960 Hit Included in National Recording Registry

Promotional material from the Everly Brothers' 'Homecoming Concerts' in Muhlenberg County
Credit Emil Moffatt

The Library of Congress has unveiled the list of this year’s 25 additions to the National Recording Registry.

Among the recordings – the Everly Brothers 1960 hit “Cathy’s Clown”, which was recorded at the RCA “Studio B” in Nashville.

Earlier this year, Muhlenberg County held a celebration of life for Phil Everly, who died January 3rd.  Everly and his brother Don held a series of charity concerts in their family’s hometown in Western Kentucky in the 1980s and 1990s.    

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Arts & Culture
12:00 pm
Sun March 23, 2014

WKU Grad Climbs To New Heights For 'Time' Magazine Cover

The Time magazine cover photo taken by WKU alum Jonathan Woods from the top of One World Trade
Credit Time

A recent assignment for WKU alumnus Jonathan Woods took him to the very top of the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere.  Woods is a Senior Editor for Photo and Interactive for Time Magazine.  He graduated from Western Kentucky’s award-winning photojournalism department in 2007.

Woods says his interest in photographing the new One World Trade Center building began when he was working for NBC News’ website during the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11th attacks in 2011. Then, he ventured on an eight-month process of negotiating with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to allow access to the 405-foot spire on top of the 1,776 foot tall building known as the Freedom Tower.  

He and a staff member from the GigaPan company climbed the ladder to take a series of photos that eventually make up a sweeping panoramic look at the Manhattan skyline.

“We were putting a camera in a place that we couldn’t go scout.  It was on top of a 405-foot tall spire, which had a 405-foot tall ladder that we were not allowed to climb until the day we went up there,” said Woods.  “So we had to work off of blueprints to create something to put a camera in a place that didn’t exist.”

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Arts & Culture
1:20 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Author Chronicles Story of 1980s Kentucky Teenage Death Row Inmate

Credit Neverland Publishing

A novel called "The Killing Jar", by author Gloria Nixon-John, is based on a true story from rural eastern Kentucky in which an incredibly gifted, but mentally disturbed 15-year-old named T0dd Ice is convicted of murdering his neighbor’s 7-year-old daughter and assaulting the neighbor in 1978.

The main character – named Ted Lynch in the book – spends several years as the nation’s youngest person on death row until his murder conviction was thrown out on appeal. During a re-trial he is convicted of manslaughter and winds up serving 15 years in prison before being released to a mental institution and then a halfway house.

Before his initial trial, Todd (Ted) was diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenic.  He would die in 2010 at age 47 after a dramatic weight gain, partially blamed on the medications he was prescribed.

The book is a novel,  but the author says she started the project as a non-fiction presentation of events. She says 95 percent of book is based on factual documentation.

She will speak at Barnes and Noble in Bowling Green tonight at 7 p.m. as part of the Kentucky Live! Series, presented by WKU Libraries.

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