Arts & Culture

A conversation with Erika Brady, long-time co-host of Barren River Breakdown on WKU Public Radio. Her work on this show earned her the Governor's Media Award in the Arts this year. She's also a faculty member in the Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology at WKU. She spoke with Station Manager Peter Bryant.

Bowling Green, Ky – In 1966, Jerry Martin was a 30 year old family doctor in Bowling Green. By that summer, he had been drafted into the Army has a combat medic. "Soldiers Saving Soldiers" is Dr. Martin's new book about the history and accomplishments of the 18th Surgical Hospital, the unit in which he served. The book contains over 500 photographs Martin took of the Vietnamese people, the countryside, and the US soldiers he operated on. He spoke to Kevin Willis ahead of Veteran's Day.

Arthur Hartfield is a Bluegrass banjo player and maker from Rocky Hill, KY. Hatfield started off in a traveling Bluegrass band, but decided he preferred to stay home and became a cabinet maker while playing in local bands. When he retired from cabinet making he decided to start professionally making banjos. This is the latest in an ongoing series of features produced for WKU Public Radio by WKU Folk Studies graduate student Rachel Hopkin.

Bowling Green, Ky – Everyone knows bourbon is Kentucky's signature spirit. But Albert Schmid says many people don't realize bourbon makes a wonderful cooking ingredient as well. Schmid is a chef and an instructor at Sullivan University's National Center for Hospitality Studies in Louisville. He recently authored "The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook", which contains seasonal recipes for food and drink. He stopped by our studios and spoke to Kevin Willis.

Horse Cave, Ky – Kentucky Repertory Theatre at Horse Cave is giving the world premiere of Where I Come From, a play set in a New York City courtroom that explores issues of race, ethnicity, and prejudice. Playwright Eric Daniels got the inspiration for the play when he served as a juror in a federal civil trial in Manhattan. KRT executive director Christopher Carter Sanderson says the play is valuable because it can provoke conversation about touchy subjects. Kevin Willis has our story.