Arts & Culture

Arts & Culture
2:23 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Work Continues to Save Downing Paintings Damaged in Museum Fire

A Joe Downing work

The job of determining how many paintings can be saved following a fire at a Bowling Green art museum continues.

An estimated 90 percent of the Joe Downing paintings housed at the estate of Jerry Baker are not seriously damaged. But WKU President Gary Ransdell told faculty and staff in an email this morning that nearly all of the paintings sustained smoke damage.

Dr. Ransdell said WKU Planning, Design, and Construction staff members are working with restoration experts and insurance professionals to start the recovery process for the museum building and the art.

Downing is a Hart County native who is one of only a few Americans that have an exhibit shown at the Louvre in Paris, France. He lived most of his adult life in France and was inspired by the natural beauty of the French countryside. He died in 2007 at his country home in the town of Menerbes.

WKU Art Department Head Brent Oglesbee says Downing’s work stands out because of its unique style, and use of color and pattern.

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Arts & Culture
4:41 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Downing Museum Art on WKU Campus Following Fire at Baker Arboretum

The scene Thursday morning at the Downing Museum at the Baker Arboretum in Bowling Green
Credit Joe Corcoran

Art lovers across the region are holding their breath and hoping that paintings damaged in a Bowling Green fire can be salvaged. The fire Thursday morning at the Downing Museum at Baker Arboretum led to the evacuation of the world's largest collection of paintings by the late artist and Hart County native Joe Downing.

Art restoration experts will now have to inspect the damaged paintings and recommend what, if anything, can be done to save the pieces that were damaged.

WKU President Gary Ransdell says the fact that over 90 percent of the art in the building was removed before it was damaged is a testament to the staff members on the scene.

"They were actually going into a building that was on fire to get artwork out. It was pretty amazing to see multiple staffs, including WKU staff, coming together to avoid what could have been a tragic, tragic, situation," said Dr. Ransdell."

The WKU President says the Downing Museum art is now being housed at the school's campus.

"All of the artwork has now been transported to the Kentucky Building, and is in storage and is protected. The art that has been damaged by smoke and water is over in the services supply building where the art restoration experts will look them over and determine what needs to be done immediately, and what needs to take place over time.

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Arts & Culture
12:47 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

At Least "90 Percent" of Art Saved Following Fire at Baker Arboretum in Bowling Green

Art from the collection at the Baker Arboretum was rescued from a Thursday morning fire.
Credit Joe Corcoran, WKU Public Radio

Update at 1:42 p.m.:

Efforts are underway to determine what can be done to salvage artwork damaged by the Thursday morning fire at Bowling Green's Downing Museum at the Baker Arboretum.

The museum houses numerous paintings by the late artist and Hart County native Joe Downing. WKU President Gary Ransdell says the Downing Museum art is now at different parts of the school's campus.

"All of the artwork has now been transported to the Kentucky Building, and is in storage and is protected," said Dr. Ransdell. "The art that has been damaged by smoke and water is over in the services supply building where the art restoration experts will look them over and determine what needs to be done immediately, and what needs to take place over time. Only a few pieces were damaged by the actual fire--I'm guessing maybe 30 or 40 pieces."

The fire started before 7 a.m. and was discovered by estate staff members. The cause of the fire is still under investigation.

Officials on the scene of the blaze this morning told WKU Public Radio the fire was likely started by an electrical malfunction or a lightning strike.

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Arts & Culture
8:21 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Kentucky Historical Society Affiliating with Smithsonian

The Kentucky Historical Society in Frankfort
Credit flickr

The Kentucky Historical Society is forming a new relationship with the Smithsonian Institution.

Historical Society officials say the affiliation will provide opportunities for innovative collaborations and will help secure the loan of Smithsonian artifacts and traveling exhibitions. The affiliation is to be announced on Saturday evening by Harold A. Closter, director of Smithsonian Affiliations.

That announcement will be part of the Historical Society's annual Boone Day celebration.

There are currently 177 Smithsonian affiliates in 42 states, Puerto Rico and Panama. Affiliation provides enhanced access to the more than 136 million objects in the Smithsonian collections, as well as the knowledge and experience of the scholars and experts at the Smithsonian.

Established in 1996, Smithsonian Affiliations is a national outreach program that develops partnerships with museums and educational and cultural organizations.

Arts & Culture
4:33 am
Wed June 19, 2013

WKU Violinist and Teacher Wins National Jefferson Award

WKU's Ching-Yi Lin gives a lesson to one of her young students.
Credit Kevin Willis

Dr. Ching-Yi Lin of Bowling Green received a Jefferson Award Tuesday in Washington.

Dr. Lin, a world-class violinist, was recognized for sharing her talent within the community by serving as the director of the WKU pre-college strings program. That program has about 70 children between four and 18 years old studying the violin, viola and cello. Besides giving performances at area schools, her students also perform at local retirement homes, charities and businesses.

The Jefferson Award is given to exceptional Americans who strive to make their communities better and stronger. Recipients are nominated from throughout the country.

Besides leading the pre-college strings program, Dr. Lin is assistant professor of violin at WKU and Concertmaster of the Symphony at WKU.

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Arts & Culture
11:21 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Like Father, Like Son: Creating Art In A Time Of Troubles

Bobbie Hanvey and his son Steafán Hanvey, in Northern Ireland.
Courtesy of Peter Muhly

Originally published on Wed June 19, 2013 3:01 pm

When I first stumbled across the photographs of Bobbie Hanvey, I thought I had found an undiscovered master — perhaps another sort of Vivian Maier. My heart skipped a beat. But when I dug a little deeper, I realized that he was quite well-known in Northern Ireland, where he has been documenting the culture in photos and audio for more than 35 years. Only recently, however, has his work become available to a wider audience.

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Arts & Culture
2:33 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

Stewart Named New Tourism Secretary

Governor Steve Beshear has named a longtime tourism veteran to oversee the part of his cabinet dealing with travel and the arts.

Bob Stewart is a familiar face in state government, having worked for 11 years as commissioner of travel from 1992 to 2003.

And now, he'll be the new Tourism Secretary, having been appointed by Beshear to fill the post vacated by Marcheta Sparrow, who’s retiring.

Stewart is starting work for his fourth governor, having previously served under Brereton Jones, Martha Layne Collins and Julian Carroll. He's either played roles in tourism or worked as an executive assistant for those governors.

Stewart begins June 1.

Arts & Culture
1:56 pm
Wed May 15, 2013

Darius Rucker to Headline SKyPac Music Festival

The Southern Kentucky Performing Arts Center is bringing musician Darius Rucker to Bowling Green this summer.  The pop-turned-country artist will headline The Sounds of Independence Music Festival on July 27th.  SKyPAC Executive Director Tom Tomlinson believes Rucker will be a big regional draw.

"I think without a doubt he's one of the biggest names to appear here in a number of years," says Tomlinson.  "He's at least one of the biggest names we've brought here since the opening night with Vince Gill."

The downtown music festival will be a fundraiser for SKYyPAC.  Tickets go on sale Friday to the general public.  The festival will be held outside the SKYyPAC facility and will feature a number of artists, including Justin Rivers from this season of "The Voice."

Arts & Culture
1:19 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Chandler Named Executive Director of Humanities Council

Ben Chandler

Former Congressman Ben Chandler will be the new executive director of the Kentucky Humanities Council. 

The non-profit group is not affiliated with the state, but works closely with state tourism and arts organizations. It is affiliated with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

"Well when I found out that [current director] Virginia Carter was retiring I actually sought out the position because it was a wonderful, unique opportunity for me to do the thing that I love, which is to promote my state, promote the culture, the tradition, the history, the people of the Commonwealth of Kentucky," he says.

Chandler will officially start July 1, as the current executive director transitions to retirement. Chandler says he sought out the new post because of his love for the state and its humanities. The new job will be full-time, and Chandler says he will be involved in the day to day operations of the council.

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Arts & Culture
8:30 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Speed Art Museum Gets $18 Million for Expansion

The Speed Art Museum in Louisville could complete its expansion and renovation five to 10 years early thanks to an $18 million donation.

The Courier-Journal reports work already has begun the project that will double the exhibition space and dramatically change the look of Kentucky's largest museum.

The new donation comes from the family of Brown-Forman Chairman Owsley Brown II. Before Brown's death in 2011, he served as chairman of the museum's building committee and honorary chairman of the capital campaign, which was raising money for the expansion.

Museum board president Allan Latts said the donation will allow the museum to shave $20 million off the project's original $79 million budget because of the lower cost of materials and labor.

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