Attorney General Jack Conway

Kentucky’s attorney general is supporting federal legislation to curb recruiting abuses by for-profit colleges.

Jack Conway and 13 attorneys general are supporting the Protecting Financial Aid for Students and Taxpayers Act sponsored by Sen. Kay R. Hagan (D-NC) and Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA).

The bill restricts colleges and universities from using federal financial aid for recruitment, advertising, and marketing purposes. 

"I support higher education and students who seek a degree to create a better life for their families, but many times I see those dreams turn to nightmares when students fall prey to a fast sales pitch from a for-profit college with a questionable reputation," Conway said. "The students end up with tens of thousands of dollars in debt and no degree."

More than $55.5 million in relief has gone to hundreds of Kentucky homeowners in the national mortgage foreclosure settlement.

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway said in a statement that a recent report from the independent settlement monitor also indicates that mortgage servicers were processing more than $2 million in additional claims for Kentucky borrowers, for a total of $57.5 million.

The statement said the 1,562 borrowers received an average of $35,534. The relief was provided by Ally/GMAC/Bank of America, Citi, Chase and Wells Fargo through Dec. 31.

Conway's office said the information provided by mortgage servicers hasn't been verified by the compliance monitor.

WKU Public Radio

On Monday, approximately 1,000 students at Henderson County High School will hear about the consequences of prescription drug abuse. Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway and Van Ingram, Executive Director of the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy, will speak to students.

Ingram told WKU Public Radio that an alarming number of teens have been experimenting with prescription medications in the state and region. He says that experimentation is especially dangerous because many young people are taking medications that may interact with other pills they have taken. State officials in Kentucky say autopsy results from those dying from prescription overdose frequently find that a "cocktail" mixture of pills.

After this week's Vice Presidential debate at Centre College in Danville, local officials say the school is ready for the next step. Centre College has now held two vice presidential debates: this year’s and one in 2000. Both went smoothly behind the scenes, and Kentucky officials such as Attorney General Jack Conway say it may be time for Centre to host a presidential debate.

A former financial planner for the Kentucky Pension Systems says an international banking scandal is leading to millions of dollars in losses for Kentucky agencies. Financial analyst Chris Tobe believes the pension systems have lost money due to the false interest rates associated with the LIBOR banking scandal.

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