Bowling Green

Rhonda J Miller

A handful of southern Kentucky activists rallied at the Bowling Green office of U.S. Senator Rand Paul in support of a national campaign to urge the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to establish an independent investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Rand Paul is a member of that committee.

Bowling Green resident Peter Zielinski said he used to be more politically conservative, but he attended the March 28 rally because he has concerns about national leaders appointed by President Trump.                          

“The history of many of the appointees is at least suspect,” said Zielinski. “There is a preponderance of people with ties to Russia and foreign governments and that’s just the tip of what we know, at this point. We don’t know the whole truth and we should know the whole truth.”

The Greenways Commission of Bowling Green and Warren County has received an $8,900 grant to improve bicycle and pedestrian safety.

Miranda Clements is the multimodal coordinator for the commission. She says safety begins with making sure everyone takes bicycle riding seriously.           

“A bicycle is considered a vehicle, so when you’re on a bicycle it’s like you’re driving a vehicle, so you have to follow the rules of the road.”

Part of the grant is for the production of short safety videos for bicyclists, pedestrians and motorists.

Kentucky LRC

A Bowling Green nursing home for military veterans is one step closer to getting state funding.

The Kentucky House Thursday unanimously passed a bill providing 10-and-a-half million dollars in state support for the proposed facility.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has already approved the project, and committed
federal funding for its construction.

The bill passed the House on a vote of 99-0.

It now goes to the Senate. If passed there, it’s expected to be signed into law by Governor Bevin.

Becca Schimmel

Supporters of refugees and immigrants in Bowling Green hope a weekend unity walk and prayer vigil helps bring the community even closer together.

More than 500 people marched in downtown Bowling Green Saturday afternoon.

Many participants said they were especially excited since a U. S. District judge in Seattle ruled President Trump’s ban on travelers from seven mostly Muslim countries illegal just hours earlier.

Becca Schimmel

A Bowling Green refugee and business owner says comments made by a senior advisor to President Trump about a so-called “Bowling Green Massacre” are hurtful to him and other refugees.

Kellyanne Conway used the expression in an interview Thursday to describe the 2011 arrests of two Iraqi citizens in Bowling Green on terrorism charges.There were no deaths related to the case. Conway said Friday that she misspoke and meant to say “Bowling Green terrorists”, not “massacre.”

Wisam Asal, an Iraqi refugee living in Warren County, says the “massacre” comments cast Bowling Green in a negative light.

City of Bowling Green

The mayor of Bowling Green says he doesn’t think recent comments about a so-called “massacre” in the city will harm its reputation.

A senior advisor to President Trump, Kellyanne Conway, cited what she called the “Bowling Green massacre” in defense of the administration’s controversial travel ban. Those comments were aired Thursday night in an interview on MSNBC.

Two Iraqi citizens were arrested in Bowling Green in 2011 on terrorism charges, but there were no attacks or deaths related to the incident.

Adam Hatcher

It’s business as usual at Warren County’s International High School despite the news of President Trump’s travel ban.

Trump issued an executive order last week temporarily banning travelers from seven majority-Muslim countries. Gateway to Educational Opportunities, or GEO, is an International school that is home to students from 25 different countries. More than half of those students are refugees.

Principal Mike Stevenson said students have been surprisingly quiet about the travel ban and they arrived at school Monday and treated it like any other day. Stevens is conscious of the effect the ban could have on international students and their relatives, but says he hasn’t felt the need to address the student body.

Fruit of the Loom

Fruit of the Loom has named a senior vice president at its global headquarters in Bowling Green as the company’s new chairman and CEO. Melissa Burgess-Taylor will lead the company following the unexpected death of former CEO Rick Medlin last month.

Bowling Green International Festival

Downtown Bowling Green will be a showcase for more than 50 international cultures this weekend.

The 27th annual Bowling Green International Festival is being held Saturday at Circus Square Park.

The event will feature information booths, musical performances, and food from more than 50 cultures. Festival board member Hannah Barahona says it’s a showcase for the many refugee and immigrant communities in Bowling Green.

“It’s a good opportunity for people to come learn about other cultures, and experience new things and new foods, and new music. But at the same time, we’re really unique in that we offer the international community here in Bowling Green an opportunity to showcase and share the things that are most special from their cultures.”

Barahona says the event has seen major growth since she started volunteering eight years ago.

City of Bowling Green

A former Bowling Green firefighter is seeking compensatory damages in a federal lawsuit against the fire department and city. 

Jeffrey Queen claims he endured a hostile work environment based on his sex and religion.  His attorney is Michele Henry of Louisville. She says during his five years at the department, Queen also overheard derogatory comments towards Muslims and African-Americans.

"He was greatly disturbed by that, and tried to complain on a number of occasions and was never able to resolve the situation," Henry told WKU Public Radio.  "The fire department never took those complaints seriously, never investigated them, or took any action to resolve this problem."

The city has acknowledged that one firefighter was placed on administrative leave for burning a copy of the Quran.  He retired before receiving any further discipline. 

City of Bowling Green

Bowling Green officials say a firefighter has retired after a video surfaced showing him burning a copy of the Quran.

The Daily News of Bowling Green reports the incident surfaced as part of a lawsuit filed this week by a former city firefighter. In a statement to the newspaper, city officials acknowledged receiving a complaint and a video of the incident in April.

City officials said they placed the firefighter depicted in the video on administrative leave. But officials say the firefighter, who has not been identified, retired before they could take other disciplinary action.

The incident was part of a lawsuit filed this week by former firefighter Jeffrey Queen, who says he faced a hostile work environment. Bowling Green officials say the allegations in no way represent the city's values.

Lisa Autry

Following a 44-year absence, commercial flights will soon take off from Bowling Green-Warren County Regional Airport.  Contour Airlines announced in May that it would begin offering flights out of Bowling Green to Atlanta, Georgia and Destin, Florida.  Airport Manager Rob Barnett discussed the service in this interview.

Autry: I know, for you, attracting commercial service has been a labor of love for the past eight years.  What do you think this will mean for the region?

Barnett: Access to air transportation is critical for a community to sustain and grow its economy and allow those visitors and business people to come into the community seamlessly rather than driving up the interstate an hour and 15 minutes to Nashville and dealing with parking and rental cars.  It's an incredible benefit to our community, not just Bowling Green and Warren County, but to our ten-county region, Barren River Area Development District.  We see this an an opportunity for a business traveler, but also for that leisure traveler.  We see this as a convenience and an economy boost for both types of travelers.

Kevin Willis

The Southern Kentucky Performing Arts Center is holding a town hall meeting to gather suggestions on ways to improve arts education.

SKyPAC is hosting the meeting Thursday, Aug. 4.

SKyPAC education outreach coordinator Joshua Miller says the goal is to get feedback from community members, educators, and artists about the center’s outreach efforts aimed at young people.

“What you’re investing in is potentially the citizen for the next 30 years of where you’re living. I think it’s just important that we pore into them, and create opportunities for the youth--as well as the community--to express, to collaborate, to be together in spaces, especially with everything going on in our society today.”

Miller says those attending will be asked for input on the following questions:

Flickr/Creative Commons/Eric Molina

The leader of Bowling Green-based health group says a needle exchange for intravenous drug users is the best way to fight the state’s addiction problems.

Dennis Chaney, director of the Barren River District Health Department, is applauding the Bowling Green city commission’s decision Tuesday to approve a needle exchange program.

The exchange must now be approved by Warren County Fiscal Court. It has already been authorized by the Warren County Board of Health.

Chaney said he understands those who feel a needle exchange will enable drug users.

But he thinks it’s the best way to break down barriers and start the healing process.

“The opportunity is for those folks who would participate in the program, the responsibility is for us to try to develop a relationship with those folks just like what you may have and you may enjoy with your primary care physician,” Chaney said.

City of Bowling Green

The Bowling Green Police chief says his department has been training for a mass shooting situation since the 1999 Columbine High School attacks.

Police preparation for mass casualty events has once again come into focus following the Orlando nightclub shootings.

Chief Doug Hawkins spoke to WKU Public Radio about the BGPD’s ability to handle catastrophic incident like the one scene at the Pulse nightclub. Hawkins says Bowling Green police have access to high-powered rifles that can penetrate body armor worn by attackers.

“One of the added pieces of equipment that we’ve added over the last few years is a patrol rifle. The Bowling Green Police Department, like a lot of other police agencies, used to utilize shotguns. But shotguns do not defeat body armor.”

Hawkins says his department is putting a lot of effort into building relationships with community members, especially Bowling Green’s immigrant and refugee populations.

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