Bowling Green

Regional
10:40 am
Mon July 14, 2014

Advocates for Veterans Want Long-Term Care Facility Built in Warren County

Dignitaries broke ground last year on a new long-term care facility for veterans in Radcliff.
Credit Kevin Willis

Some retired military veterans are asking Kentucky lawmakers to commit funding for a new long-term care facility for veterans that would be located in Bowling Green.

The commonwealth currently has only three such facilities, with a fourth veterans nursing home scheduled to open next summer in Hardin County.

Dr. Ray Biggerstaff served in Vietnam as a Captain with the 101st Airborne Division, based in Fort Campbell. He told state lawmakers in Frankfort that the number of veterans in the south-central Kentucky region makes Warren County a logical location for a long-term care operation.

“When we take a look at the demographic data for Bowling Green and the Barren River Area Development District, we’re looking at a total of 20,000 veterans in that particular area. Surrounding the area, we have an additional 22,000 veterans that are in the perimeter,” said Biggerstaff.

Biggerstaff said he also thought a long-term care facility for veterans in southern Kentucky could attract veterans who live in northern Tennessee.

In testimony before a joint committee on State Veterans, Military Affairs, and Public Protection, Biggerstaff said backers of the proposed veteran’s nursing home in Warren County have identified a 30-acre site off I-65 near the Kentucky Transpark as a possible location for the facility.

The nursing home being built in Hardin County will sit on 195 acres of land donated by the Defense Department, and feature a dozen ten-person homes providing full nursing services to 120 veterans. It’s scheduled to open next June.

Kentucky’s three nursing homes for veterans currently in operation are in Hopkins, Jessamine, and Perry counties.

Politics
5:00 am
Sun July 13, 2014

Representative Richards Facing First Tea Party Challenge

Tea Party candidate Jenean Hampton of Bowling Green is challenging incumbent State Representative Jody Richards in the November election.
Credit Jenean Hampton

Veteran State Representative Jody Richards of Bowling Green is facing his first Tea Party challenger in the November election. Jenean Hampton is taking on the longest continuously serving state representative in Kentucky history. 

"There was much prayer involved. This wasn't my plan," said Hampton in an interview with WKU Public Radio. "Sometimes you're screaming at the TV, you see things that need to be improved, and you're screaming that someone needs do something, well sometimes that someone is you."

Hampton serves as chair of the Bowling Green-Southern Kentucky Tea Party. The 55-year-old Republican is an Air Force veteran and businesswoman who wants to use her private sector experience to spur economic development in the commonwealth.

In her first run at public office, Hampton is taking on political heavyweight Jody Richards who was first elected to the legislature in 1975 and served as House Speaker from 1995 to 2009. Over that time, he's become the recipient of several plum committee assignments, including Appropriations and Revenue.  Richards told WKU Public Radio that his influence in Frankfort could not be matched by a newcomer.

"No new person would have my committee lineup nor would they have the connections I do," he suggested. "I pride myself  in working well with both sides of the aisle."

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Immigration Debate
4:46 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

In Bowling Green, Coalition of Eclectic Groups Speaks Out for Immigration Reform

Albert Mbanfu, Executive Director, Bowling Green International Center; Dalton Workman, Chairman, WKU College Republican; and H.H. Barlow, Owner, Barlu Farms, Presidential Appointee to US Board for International Food & Agriculture Development speak in favor of national immigration reform during the press conference at the International Center in Bowling Green, Ky.
Credit Abbey Oldham

A coalition of business, political, and refugee-rights groups in south-central Kentucky is calling on Congress to pass immigration reform.  

As part of a so-called national “Day of Action”, representatives from various backgrounds spoke Wednesday in Bowling Green about the need for Congressional  leaders and the Obama Administration to get reform passed this year.

Barren County dairy farmer H.H. Barlow, a presidential appointee to the U.S. Board for International Food and Agriculture Development, said many Americans don’t understand the impact immigrant labor has on sectors such as the agriculture industry.

“I hate the word ‘criminals’, or ‘illegal aliens’—I don’t like that term. They’re workers. They’re performing an essential service to our country,” Barlow said.

The Barren County farmer said he speaks to his elected representatives about the need for immigration reform each time he sees them. Barlow believes that reform will not only benefit immigrants, but also the U.S. economy.

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Regional
2:04 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Fountain Temporarily Shut Down at Bowling Green's Circus Square Park

Circus Square Park near downtown Bowling Green
Credit Emil Moffatt

One way many Bowling Green families cool off in the summer is with a stop by Circus Square Park near downtown.  But the water fountain at the center of the square that often serves as a playground for small children won’t be working for the next few weeks. 

On Monday, crews discovered a hydrochloric acid leak that damaged some of the underground wiring for the pumps that operate the fountain.  City spokesperson Kim Lancaster says a contractor is currently evaluating how much damage was done.

“It looks like we have a good chance of getting the fountain at least partially operational in the next couple of weeks,” said Lancaster.  “It may not have all of the pumps running and it may not have the patterns that we like to run.”

Lancaster says an estimated timetable for a full repair is still unknown.  She says the hydrochloric acid is used to maintain a pH balance of the chlorine, much like a swimming pool.

Business
3:50 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Construction to Begin Soon on New Aluminum Production Facility in Warren County

A new $150 million aluminum production facility in Bowling Green will create 80 new jobs.

Governor Beshear was on hand Wednesday morning at the Kentucky Transpark as ground was broken on the Japanese-European partnership. The joint venture between Contellium N.V. and UACJ Corporation will create finished aluminum body sheets for cars and trucks.

Construction on the 225,000-square-foot facility will begin this summer.

Regional
11:56 am
Thu June 5, 2014

400 Mile Yard Sale Brings Shoppers From Far and Wide

Wayne Wade keeps an eye on his customers and on Highway 68 in the background during the first morning of the 400 Mile Sale.
Credit Joe Corcoran photo

The next four days are a bargain hunter's dream as the 11th annual "400 Mile Sale" returns to the Commonwealth. It's Kentucky's yard sale, stretching along Highway 68 from Maysville to Paducah and into western Tennessee, and giving people a chance to show off their trash and treasures to anyone and everyone willing to stop and look.

This is the fourth year Wayne Wade has set up shop at his friend's yard in Warren County. He says he likes the spot since it's under two big trees that give them shade from the sun and cover from the rain.

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Business
5:21 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Holley Creates New R&D Facility at Bowling Green Headquarters

Holley Performance Products says the research and development facility at their Bowling Green headquarters will bring a $1.3 million investment and create 20 new jobs. It's being described as a work cell for designing new exhaust systems.

The work cell will develop and prove new designs, processes and manufacturing techniques. It will focus on improving processes and methods in order to decrease production time, accommodate sales volume and maintain high quality of products.

The facility will allow Holley to expand its exhaust product lines under their Hooker Header and Flowtech brands including premium quality exhaust systems for late model muscle cars and trucks and classic vehicles.

Holley has been in Bowling Green since 1951. It employs more than 250 people at its Russellville Road facility.

Regional
3:05 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Bowling Green Bosnian Community Coming Together to Help Balkan Flood Victims

Brickyard Cafe is one of several Bowling Green restaurants participating in the effort to help flood victims in the Balkans.
Credit visitbgky.com

Members of Bowling Green’s Bosnian-American community are uniting to help family and friends in Europe who have been impacted by flooding.

Bosnia-Hercegovina, Croatia, and Serbia have been devastated this month by the worst flooding to hit the Balkans in over a century. In response, Bowling Green residents of Bosnian descent are working to generate funds for those who have lost everything in the high waters.

Recent WKU graduate Mersiha Demirovic says the effort has allowed local Bosnian-Americans to look past ethnic divisions and unite under a single cause.

“Rather than just one group coming together to organize the event, we have members of several different ethnic groups from Bosnia coming together to help with this event,” she told WKU Public Radio.

A flood-relief fundraiser Saturday in Bowling Green is designed to generate money to purchase medical supplies for those impacted by the flooding.

“We found a company in Louisville that said they would ship six to eight tons of medical supplies to Bosnia, but we just have to pay for shipping,” said Djana Salihbasic.

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Regional
1:24 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Report: Owensboro Mayor Wants to Boost Population by Annexing Subdivisions

Could the annexation of nearby subdivisions give Owensboro a larger population than Bowling Green?
Credit City of Owensboro

The mayor of Owensboro says the city should consider trying to annex nearby subdivisions in order to boost its population.

Ron Payne made the comments following the release of census numbers showing Bowling Green has grown at a faster pace than Owensboro.

Those figures from the U.S. Census Bureau reflect populations on July 1, 2013.

Bowling Green retained its position as the state’s third-largest city, with a population of 61,488 people. Owensboro remained fourth-largest, with just over 58,416.

That 3,072-person advantage by Bowling Green is more than the gap between the two cities during the 2010 census. Four years ago, Bowling Green had just an 800-person advantage.

The Messenger-Inquirer reports Owensboro Mayor Ron Payne and City Manager Bill Parrish are talking about meeting with homeowner associations in subdivisions along Kentucky 54 in order to gauge their interest in being annexed by the city.

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Education
6:00 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Hearing Officer Stays With Original Ruling in Bowling Green-Warren County Schools Standoff

A hearing officer in the non-resident student dispute between the two school districts recommended Tuesday that the city schools continue to be permitted to enroll 750 county students for the next school year. Those students have to apply to city schools to be accepted and pay a tuition.

“The WCPS Board is committed to doing what is fair and equitable for all kids and this belief remains steadfast," Warren County Superintendent Rob Clayton said in a news release.  "Our Board is not in position to enter into a nonresident contract unless the agreement is transparent, fair and equitable for all students and the Hearing Officer’s recommendation is in stark contrast to this position."

Hearing officer Mike Wilson's recommendation now goes to Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday for his final ruling, which could still be appealed to the Kentucky State Board of Education.

Wilson's recommendation on the number of county students accepted was virtually identical to a decision he handed down last year. Among the findings in the 40 page report were the opinions that there's no evidence to suggest the non-resident process that Bowling Green uses is unfair. The recommendation did not suggest any guideline or deadlines for future negotiations.

The two school districts have been at odds for more than a year regarding the non-resident student cap.

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