Charlottesville

Ryland Barton

Southern Indiana white nationalist leader Matthew Heimbach has been sentenced to 38 days in jail for violating his probation for a disorderly conduct conviction stemming from a 2016 Donald Trump rally in Louisville.

Heimbach is the founder of the Traditionalist Worker Party. Last year he pleaded guilty to physically harassing an African-American woman at the Trump rally, but a judge released him under the condition that he take anger management classes and stay out of trouble for two years.

Heather Heyer memorial facebook

The Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky is honoring the woman who died during a white nationalist rally in Virginia that descended into deadly violence.

The center is posthumously giving Heather Heyer the Muhammad Ali Humanitarian Award for Social Justice.

Heyer was killed in August during demonstrations over the proposed removal of a Robert E. Lee statue in Charlottesville, Virginia. 

She was hit by a car that plowed into a crowd that had gathered to denounce the white supremacists.  

The 32-year-old Heyer was a paralegal known to stand up for causes of equality and justice.

The Ali Center says Heyer "embodied the spirit of the civil rights movement." 

Rick Howlett

About two-dozen demonstrators held signs and delivered speeches Tuesday outside the Louisville office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, demanding that McConnell hold President Donald Trump accountable for comments he made following this month’s deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The Louisville protest was organized by Melissa Byrne of the group UltraViolet. According to its Facebook page, the group “works on a range of issues, including health care, economic security, violence, and reproductive rights.”

Flickr/Creative Commons/J. Stephen Conn

A bipartisan group of community leaders and lawmakers called for the removal of the Jefferson Davis statue from the state Capitol rotunda during a rally on Wednesday.

The gathering came in response to the violent white supremacist protests in Charlottesville, Virginia, over that city’s removal of a Robert E. Lee statue.

“Do not ever tell me that Confederate symbols have no meaning,” said Sadiqa Reynolds, president of the Louisville Urban League.

“We have fought in America’s wars, we have nursed your children, we have prayed for your souls and still when we walk through our country and see the symbols of hate that we endure being flown, raised and honored, we are told to get over it.”

J. Tyler Franklin

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell condemned white supremacists who are gearing up for a rally in Lexington in response to plans to remove statues of Confederate generals from city property.

“We can have no tolerance for an ideology of racial hatred,” McConnell said in a statement. “There are no good neo-nazis, and those who espouse their views are not supporters of American ideals and freedoms. We all have a responsibility to stand against hate and violence, wherever it raises its evil head.”

mapio.net

An Owensboro man is leading an effort to move a Confederate statue off the Daviess County Courthouse lawn.

Twenty-two-year-old Jesse Bean started a petition on the website Change.org to convince local leaders to act.

Bean says he was inspired to take on the issue following the weekend violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and efforts in Lexington to move a pair of Confederate statues away from that city’s downtown.

Bean says the local statue should be displayed at the Owensboro Museum of Science and History.

CHANGE.ORG PETITION

A group called ‘Paducah Residents’ has started an online petition seeking the removal and replacement of Confederate monuments in the city and the renaming of a school named after the wife of a Confederate general. 

The Change.org petition says the monuments represent an era of African American oppression and slavery and gloss over historic violence. The letter also says the monuments serve to promote a “retelling of history that allows slave owners and bigots to be seen as heroes, and continues to embolden and empower racist and white nationalist event today.” 

The aftermath of the violent protest and counterprotests in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend continue to reverberate across the country — sparking discussions about race and the country's Civil War past.

Mourners gathered in Charlottesville on Wednesday to remember Heather Heyer, who was killed on Saturday when a car rammed into a crowd of people protesting the white nationalist rally. Attendees were asked to wear purple, Heyer's favorite color, in her memory.

J. Tyler Franklin

Gov. Matt Bevin says that he’s opposed to removing Confederate monuments from public property, calling it a “sanitization of history.”

The statement comes days after violence in Charlottesville, Virginia stemming from a white nationalist protest of that city’s plans to remove a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee.

“I absolutely disagree with this sanitization of history,” Bevin said in an interview on WVHU radio in Huntington, West Virginia.

Officer Accused of Mocking Death in Charlottesville, Va.

Aug 15, 2017
Creative Commons

A Kentucky police officer is facing discipline for allegedly making a Facebook post mocking the death of a woman killed after a vehicle rammed into a protest against a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Shively police Lt. Col. Josh Myers says that Officer Morris Rinehardt was placed Monday on paid administrative leave and that an internal investigation is underway.

Local news outlets report the post on Rinehardt's personal Facebook page is a picture of a car with a caption that says, "When you were born a Challenger but identify as a Ram." The man charged in connection to the Charlottesville incident was driving a Dodge Challenger.

Credit Flickr/Creative Commons/J. Stephen Conn

Kentucky’s NAACP chapter is renewing efforts to remove a statue of Jefferson Davis from the state capitol rotunda after a deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend.

“It is an issue that speaks to today’s society and where we are in America in terms of race,” said Raoul Cunningham, president of the Louisville NAACP.

Cunningham said the statue is offensive to African-Americans and that Davis, former president of the Confederate States of America, is falsely regarded as a hero.

“That he was not. He was a traitor to the United States government, aside from the other convictions he had in regard to slavery,” said Cunningham.

Becca Schimmel

A vigil calling for solidarity with Charlottesville, Virginia, and an end to white supremacy was held in downtown Bowling Green Sunday night. The event was in response to the deadly attack on counter-protesters at a white supremacist rally Saturday in Charlottesville that killed one person and injured at least 19 others.

About 200 people attended the vigil, holding candles in support of victims and signs in protest of white supremacy. Will Heller brought his son to the event to show him how people can come together and unite against hate.

 

 

The young man accused of plowing a car into a crowd of people protesting a white supremacist rally was fascinated with Nazism, idolized Adolf Hitler, and had been singled out by school officials in the 9th grade for his "deeply held, radical" convictions on race, a former high school teacher said Sunday.

James Alex Fields Jr. also confided that he had been diagnosed with schizophrenia when he was younger and had been prescribed an anti-psychotic medication, Derek Weimer said in an interview with The Associated Press.