civil rights

This year's pool of 35 nominees has been selected from which the inductees will be chosen.

The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights says the nominees are men and women who have helped improve the quality of life for Kentuckians in the areas of human and civil rights.

They include:

**  WKU professor of social ethics and racial justice Dr. Alan Anderson who worked with Dr. Martin Luther King and wrote a Pulitzer Prize-nominated book about the experience.

** Bowling Green Housing Authority executive director Abraham Williams.

Kentucky LRC

Update 5:45 p.m.

The Kentucky House has rejected changes to a bill that would automatically restore voting rights to many felons.

This throws out a set of revisions from the Republican-controlled Senate that would have reduced the number of affected felons by more than half.

Bill sponsor Jesse Crenshaw implored colleagues to vote against the changes.

“The Senate committee substitute is a totally different bill. It does not accomplish what House Bill 70 was intended to accomplish,” said Crenshaw

The Senate must decide whether to drop its changes or keep them. If it’s the latter, the bill will go to a conference committee so lawmakers can seek a compromise.

Sen. Damon Thayer proposed the rejected changes in the Senate. He says it's premature to speculate about how the Senate will react.

Original Post

Thousands of people descended onto the Kentucky state Capitol building Wednesday to celebrate the 50th anniversary of a Civil Rights march led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  The original 1964 march on Frankfort agitated for Civil Rights in segregation-era Kentucky, building support for the passage of the 1966 Kentucky Civil Rights Act.

Martin Luther King may not have had a vote in Congress, but he and the movement he helped lead were integral to getting the civil rights bill introduced. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the passage of that bill, now known as the Civil Rights Act.

Among other things, the act outlawed discrimination in public accommodations — including restaurants, hotels and motels — ending the era of legal segregation in those places.

Richard Brown was re-appointed to the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights earlier this year. He was also inducted into the Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame for his life-long work fighting for racial equality.

Joe Corcoran spoke with Richard Brown about his decades of leading the struggle for equality.

A documentary exploring the life of Kentucky civil rights leader Anne Braden is set to premiere in Louisville this weekend. The film, produced by Whitesburg-based Appalshop, gives people a look at the extraordinary life and legacy of Braden, who was hailed by the late Martin Luther King Jr. as "eloquent and prophetic" in her rejection of segregation in Louisville.

Former State Senator Georgia Powers, who was a pivotal figure in the Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky, is scheduled to appear tonight at a "Kentucky Live" event hosted by WKU Libraries. Senator Powers, who was the first African American to serve in the Kentucky Senate, will attend a discussion about her career.