Civil War Series

A series of features marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.  Produced by Dan Modlin.

The two day Battle of Nashville was marked by delays, confusion, some say incompetence and bitter, vicious warfare. WKU historians Dr. Glenn LaFantasie and Dr. Jack Thacker say when it was all over the Confederate Army was decimated and in disarray, Nashville was secure and the War was beginning its end.

Library of Congress

This week marks the 150th anniversary of one of the most important battles of the Civil War.

In this series of three interviews, Dan Modlin speaks with WKU professors Jack Thacker and Glenn LaFantasie about the pivotal battle at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

This series of conversations discusses the battle as it unfolded over three days in July, 1863.

WKU professors Jack Thacker and Glenn LaFantasie talk about the contributions of African-American soldiers to the U.S. Civil War effort, and President Lincoln's role in arming former slaves. They also point out that black units were often placed under inexperienced and ineffective white officers.

This is the latest in WKU Public Radio's series of reports on the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.

New Study Raises Civil War Death Toll

Nov 29, 2012

A newly released study has raised the estimated deaths from the Civil War by almost 20 percent. Joe Corcoran speaks with WKU Civil War historians Dr. Glenn LaFantasie and Dr. Jack Thacker.

This is a compilation of reports by WKYU-FM's Joe Corcoran that is being submitted for Best Series/Documentary in the 2013 Kentucky Associated Press Broadcasters radio awards.

These reports aired March 5, March 12, and March 19, 2012.

Joe's reports tap into the expertise of two Civil War historians in our region who explore how women disguised themselves as men to fight in the war; the impact of women who served as nurses on both sides of the fighting; and the role of women who remained at home and on the farms while the fighting raged on.

Women in the Civil War: On The Homefront

Mar 19, 2012

As their husbands, sons and fathers went off to fight on the front lines, women who stayed behind had to keep the family going however they could. In this third part of his three-part series Women in the Civil War, Joe Corcoran speaks with WKU Civil War historians Dr. Jack Thacker and Dr. Glenn LaFantasie about the new gender roles women were forced to take on and how those changes are still being felt today.

The casualty numbers of the Civil War were staggering for both the Union and the Confederacy. They would have been much higher without the thousands of women who volunteered as nurses in hospitals and homes.

Women in the Civil War

Mar 5, 2012

One of the best kept secrets of the Civil War is the number of women who disguised themselves as men so they could fight on the front lines. In the first of his three-part series Women in the Civil War, Joe Corcoran speaks with WKU Civil War historians Dr. Glenn LaFantasie and Dr. Jack Thacker about these forgotten warriors.

Bowling Green, KY – Civil War Historians Dr. Jack Thacker and Dr. Glen LaFantasie say President Lincoln looked at the state of Kentucky as a key pivotal area as he tried to address slavery issues in the days leading up to the start of the Civil War. Lincoln considered Kentucky to be a key strategic location, in part because of its access to the Ohio River.Dan Modlin has more on the story.........