Civil War Series

A series of features marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.  Produced by Dan Modlin.

Antietam Natiional Battlefield / National Park Service

One-hundred-fifty years ago this week, Union and Confederate forces met for one of the deadliest single day battles in American history. The Battle of Antietam took place in Maryland, after Confederate commander Robert E. Lee decided to move north from Virginia. The battle is remembered for high casualty figures and graphic photographs that increased public awareness about the death and suffering caused by the fighting.

Clinton Lewis / WKU University Relations

As Congress has struggled to move ahead with a variety of legislative packages in recent years, some WKU historians have drawn a contrast between contemporary lawmakers and those who made up the 37th Congress. That Civil War-era group of legislators were successful in passing several significant pieces of legislation at the same time the nation was split by the war between the Union and Confederacy.

Some of the largest troop movements of the American Civil War took place 150 years ago this week. WKU Military Historian Jack Thacker and Dr. Glenn LaFantasie of the WKU Institute for Civil War Studies say the Second Battle of Bull Run was significant for several reasons, including the emergence of Robert E. Lee's strategy for fighting the remainder of the war.

WKU Historians Dr. Jack Thacker and Dr. Glenn LaFantasie say many universities and colleges have cut back on course offerings that cover Civil War history. They say its part of a trend that's disappointing to many people who have a strong interest in the field, especially as the nation marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.

One hundred and fifty years ago this month, Union forces hoped to capture the Confederate capitol of Richmond. In fighting that became known as the "Peninsula Campaign," Robert E. Lee kept his promise that the city would be defended.

150 Years ago Union and Confederate forces were involved in some bloody fighting that became known as the "Peninsula Campaign." The Union developed a plan to attack the Confederate Capital of Richmond, Virginia, but a combination of factors, including indecisive command decisions,  kept the North from succeeding with that plan. This fighting led to the emergence of Confederate Commander  Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia, according to WKU historians Dr. Glenn LaFantasie and Dr. Jack Thacker.

150 years ago this month, Union and Confederate forces met in some bloody fighting in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley.  Stonewall Jackson distinguished himself in the field, in fighting that demonstrated the importance of good maps and accurate military intelligence. 

Kentucky Historical Society

In April of 1862, both the Union and Confederate leadership considered New Orleans to be an important strategic location. The battle that took place there involved chains in the river and a Mayor who refused to surrender, even after Union forces had won the battle. WKU Military Historian Jack Thacker and Glenn LaFantasie of the WKU Institute for Civil War Studies talk with WKU Public Radio in the latest of our ongoing series of reports marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.

As taxpayers face tomorrow's income tax filing deadline, WKU Historian Dr. Jack Thacker says income taxes were first established in the United States during the Civil War. He says the federal government used income taxes as a way to help pay for the war effort.

National Park Service

The Battle of Shiloh, one of the most pivotal and bloody battles of the U.S. Civil War, started 150 years ago today.

WKU Military Historian Jack Thacker and Dr. Glenn LaFantasie of the WKU Institute for Civil War Studies say Shiloh changed the way many military leaders and the general public viewed the war.

This is part of our ongoing series about the Civil War.  You can access more stories here.

 

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