domestic violence

Kentucky LRC

Kentucky is one step closer to providing victims of dating violence with the same protections that married victims have.

A Senate committee on Tuesday passed a bill that would allow people to file an interpersonal protective order against an abusive dating partner. The bill has passed the House and now heads to the full Senate.

Kentucky is the only state that doesn’t offer civil protection to victims of dating violence. Currently only couples who are married, share a child or cohabitate can file protective orders against their partners.

Rep. John Tilley, a Hopkinsville Democrat, said the bill can solve problems quickly without entering the criminal justice system.

“More than half of those who enter this system, the violence stops with a civil protected order,” Tilley said. “In other words, criminal sanctions aren’t necessary. Sometimes the victim doesn’t want to go through the criminal justice process.”

Kentucky LRC

A bill that would give victims of dating violence increased protections passed the House on Thursday evening.

The bill, which has the support of the Gov. Steve Beshear and First Lady Jane Beshear, passed the House unanimously.

But Rep. Donna Mayfield, a Republican from Winchester, expressed concern about the bill, saying that the present system already protects victims.

“I just fear that this opens the floodgates to some situations that may dilute the purity of this situation, the way that we have it in the courts right now,” Mayfield said.

“I’m afraid that those people who desperately need our protection are going to be put in the same pool as a middle school couple, perhaps, that has had a spat.”

A majority of Kentuckians think that the state’s domestic violence laws should include unmarried couples who haven’t live together and those who don’t share a child, according to a poll released Thursday.

The Kentucky Health Issues Poll  found that 80 percent of Kentucky adults favor changing current Kentucky law to allow people to file a domestic violence protection order against a current or former dating partner regardless of their living arrangements or whether they have children together.

Dating Violence Bill Undergoes Rewrite

Nov 10, 2014

Attempts to win approval of dating violence legislation in the Kentucky General Assembly could be bolstered by a new strategy. 

Kentucky Domestic Violence Association Director Sherry Currens says lawmakers will be asked to consider creating a new section in Kentucky Revised Statutes for domestic partner dating violence. Currens says the domestic partner statutes pertaining to dating violence have been aired in the state capital numerous times.

 "And it's calling it an IPO, so it's an interpersonal protective order and it will be in chapter 456. So it's establishing a new section," said Currens.

Currens says there were some members of the state legislature who asked for domestic partner dating violence protections to be removed from current spouse abuse statutes.  The revised legislation was reviewed during an interim legislative meeting Friday. 

Currens says lawmakers should be well acquainted with the issues today. 

"I think everybody is pretty familiar with the bill, with the concept.  As I said before, it's a very long bill, but it's mostly just moving existing statute into a new section, so they're really aren't that many changes to the bill.  So, I'm very hopeful," explained Currens.

A bill that would extend domestic violence protections for unmarried couples in Kentucky has passed a state House committee.

The bill would expand domestic violence protections to couples who are or were in a romantic relationship. Currently, the law protects individuals who have been married to, have a child with or have lived with their abuser.

Kentucky Domestic Violence Association President Darlene Thomas said the law must be expanded to protect all victims of domestic violence.

“Our criminal justice system, rightfully so, is purposeful and cautious, as a means to ensure that the rights of the accused are protected," she said. "However, for a victim of domestic violence, that process is cumbersome and lengthy

Gov. Steve Beshear expressed support for the measure in his State of the Commonwealth address this week.

Similar legislation has easily cleared the House before, but has stalled in the Republican-controlled Senate.

A bill that would extend domestic-violence protection to dating partners is being taken up Wednesday by members of a Kentucky House committee.

House Bill 8 received an endorsement Tuesday night by Governor Steve Beshear, who spoke in favor of the bill during his “State of the Commonwealth” address. Supporters have been trying to get such legislation passed since 2007.

Kentucky House Judiciary Committee Chairman John Tilley of Hopkinsville sponsored a bill last year that died without receiving a floor vote.

Tilly is again sponsoring legislation this session that would allow dating partners to obtain domestic violence protective orders.

Churchill Downs

Jockey Robby Albarado lost his ride in the Kentucky Oaks, after being arrested on an assault charge this morning. Jefferson County Sheriff's Department spokesman Carl Yates says Albarado was arrested at a local residence, several hours before he was slated to ride "Hard Not to Like" in the Oaks.