eclipse

Western Kentucky University

The stars have aligned for a national organization of Corvette enthusiasts holding its national convention in Bowling Green, Kentucky beginning Aug. 21.

That’s the day of the solar eclipse and Bowling Green is in the prime viewing area.

Bowling Green is the only place the Corvette is made, so car clubs often have conventions in town and the GM Corvette plant is always on the ‘must see’ list.

WKU Hardin Planetarium

Western Kentucky University is planning for its football stadium to be filled with a crowd of 8,000 to 20,000 school-age children for the solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21. 

WKU has invited area school districts to share the highly anticipated event that will cause the day to go dark for about one minute at 1:27 p.m. in Bowling Green.

The path of the eclipse runs across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina. Locations nearest the center line will experience darkness for two-minutes-and-43-seconds. Bowling Green is at the edge of the “path of totality” for the eclipse.

Rhonda J Miller

Hopkinsville is continuing to gear up for this summer’s solar eclipse. The astronomical event on Aug. 21 is expected to attract more than 50,000 visitors from around the globe to Christian County.

That’s because Hopkinsville is a point of longest duration of the total solar eclipse – two-minutes-and-40-seconds.

Cheryl Cook is executive director of the Hopkinsville-Christian County Convention and Visitors Bureau. She says preparation has been full-speed ahead with the mayor, governor, the National Guard and emergency management groups all playing a role.

But Cook says planners are still expecting the unexpected when it goes dark just after one o’clock in the afternoon on Aug. 21.

kentuckytourism.com

Less than a year away now from a total solar eclipse expected to draw thousands of tourists to western Kentucky, the Kentucky Department of Travel and Tourism has launched a website for the event.

It will be the first total solar eclipse visible from the contiguous United States since 1979, and its epicenter runs through western Kentucky, with the “point of greatest eclipse” in Christian County.

The website includes a map of prime viewing locations, eclipse duration information for each location and eye safety tips.

The eclipse will occur on Monday, August 21, 2017.

The Western Kentucky town of Hopkinsville has hit the astronomical jackpot. When a total eclipse of the sun darkens skies Aug. 21, 2017, the show will last longer in a stretch of hilly country near Hopkinsville than any place on the planet. It will last two minutes and 40 seconds, not much longer than the Kentucky Derby.