education

Education
5:51 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Ransdell: Little Chance Free Community College Plan Will Become a Reality

WKU President Gary Ransdell
Credit WKU

WKU President Gary Ransdell believes a White House plan to make community college free has little chance of becoming reality.

In his State of the Union speech Tuesday, President Obama announced a plan to offer two years of tuition-free community college to students who maintained certain academic standards.

The effort would cost about $60 billion over ten years, with the federal government picking up three-quarters of the cost, and states paying for the rest.

Speaking to WKU Public Radio during a break in Friday's Board of Regents meeting, Ransdell said that’s an unsustainable model. 

“There’s no way I can be advocate for Kentucky putting money into that and continuing to cut higher education for the public universities."

Ransdell said he understands that the technical and associate’s degrees that many community college graduates earn help drive the manufacturing sector. 

“But the reality is, it’s bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees that drive the economy, and those are the people who are the decision-makers with the intellectual skills that go into driving the economy.”

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Education
6:27 am
Thu January 22, 2015

Kentucky Community & Technical College System Releases Details of President Emeritus Deal

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 11:48 am

As the new — and paid — president emeritus of the Kentucky Community & Technical College System, Michael McCall will attend meetings, give advice, provide executive coaching, help hire new executives and help run a systemwide leadership academy now bearing his name.

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Education
5:37 pm
Wed January 21, 2015

Half of Kentucky’s Kindergartners Were Ready For School

The number of Kentucky children who are prepared for kindergarten is nearly unchanged over last year—half of kids entering school still don’t have the basic skills that the state deems as necessary to be “kindergarten-ready.”

The Kentucky Department of Education’s annual kindergarten readiness results released Wednesday show that 50 percent of children are prepared for a public education, a 1 percent increase from last year.

In Jefferson County Public Schools, 51.9 percent of children were ready for kindergarten this school year.

Last year, 52.3 percent of Jefferson County Public Schools’ kindergartners were ready—a higher rate than the state average, which was 49 percent. While that rate is still slightly higher than the state average, it’s a slight drop for JCPS.

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Education
4:24 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

University of Louisville Gets $12.6 Million Gift for Music, Athletics

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 3:58 pm

The University of Louisville’s music school and athletics department will share a $12.6 million gift from retired pilot and investor Max Baumgardner of Louisville.

The $6.3 million donation to the School of Music is the largest planned gift in its 82-year history, the university said Tuesday in a news release.

The money will be used to create the Max Baumgardner Endowed Fund for Excellence in Jazz Studies.

Michael Tracy, head of U of L’s jazz program, said the funds will support faculty positions, scholarships and other programs, including studies abroad.

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Education
1:43 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Bowling Green Schools Chief Announces Retirement

Bowling Green Schools Superintendent Joe Tinius will retire June 30, 2015.
Credit Bowling Green City Schools

The superintendent of Bowling Green Independent Schools has announced plans to retire. 

Joe Tinius has worked in the city school system since 1977 in a number of roles, including teacher, coach, and principal.  He became superintendent in 2005. 

In a letter submitted to the Board of Education, Tinius said after 37 years in education, he had reached the point in his life where he wanted to spend more time with his wife, children, and grandchild. 

He tells WKU Public Radio that while technology and education reforms have had major impacts on Kentucky’s classrooms, a teacher’s ability to connect with students remains vital.

“It is still, at the end of the day, that personal relationship that teachers develop with students that ultimately determines how much of an impact and effective the learning process is.”

Tinius says one of the biggest changes he’s seen over the years is the increasing diversity of the area’s student population, with major growth seen in the number of students who speak English as a second language. Tinius said school administrators have to be willing to connect with students and parents from international communities.

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Education
1:53 pm
Mon January 19, 2015

New 'Bluegrass Diploma' to Emphasize College, Career Readiness For Kentucky Students

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 5:52 am

Kentucky educators are experimenting with possible changes to the state’s high school diploma.

The Kentucky Department of Education, the Council on Postsecondary Education and the Education Professional Standards Board are collaborating to consider ways that the high school diploma can better reflect the college and career achievements that students attain while in school.

The new diploma may also try to encourage students to pursue an education that will lead them to careers in foreign business.

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Education
1:51 pm
Mon January 19, 2015

Kentucky School Districts Brace for $8M in State Cuts

Originally published on Mon January 19, 2015 1:16 pm

Kentucky School districts are bracing for a mid-year state funding cut totaling nearly $8 million.

The cut is relatively small given the state’s $2.9 billion K-12 budget. 

Kentucky Department of Education Associate Commissioner Hirem Desai says the cuts are due to mostly higher than projected attendance which despite the funding cut, is a good thing. 

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Education
8:16 am
Fri January 16, 2015

New GED Test Means Many Have To Start From Scratch

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Mon January 19, 2015 9:48 am

On New Year's Eve, 2013, as people were setting up house parties around the country and Times Square workers were preparing for the ball to drop, a small few were instead rushing to their local GED testing centers. Tyron Jackson, a 24-year old resident of Washington D.C., was one of them.

He had taken a prep course in the District and, because of aggressive marketing by the GED Testing Service, knew that Dec. 31 was his last good chance to pass the old version of the high school equivalency exam. For 2014, a newer, much harder test was coming.

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Education
4:14 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Federal Grant to Help Nine Kentucky High Schools Impact Special Needs Students

The grant will help other school model a successful program at Franklin-Simpson High School
Credit Franklin-Simpson High School

A $3 million federal grant will go towards efforts to improve the career and college readiness of special needs students at nine Kentucky high schools.

The four-year grant awarded to the Green River Regional Educational Cooperative will model a program currently in place at Franklin-Simpson High School. That program matches educators and disabled students for an hour a week, with the educator focusing on ways to help the student achieve success in the classroom.

“So she might help him to catch up on homework, she might work on his study skills, she might arrange for him to do an internship down the road at a business or an industry,” said Johna Rogers, with the GRREC.  

Rodgers says the idea is to provide consistent, one-on-one guidance that will help special-needs students reach their educational and career goals. Each student in the program will have what’s known as an Individual Career Plan, tailored to the individual’s aspirations and abilities.

“And I think that is one of the key strategies—identifying chunks of time where teachers, who are specially trained to work on college-career readiness, are able to move that child forward from wherever he is, to where he wants to be.”

The nine schools included in the grant are:

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Education
3:53 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

U-Pike Will Offer Scholarships to Start Online Video Gaming Team

League of Legends is an extremely popular multi-player online game that attracts fans from all over the world.

A Kentucky school is becoming just the second university in the nation to offer scholarships for competitive video game players.

The University of Pikeville will offer 20 scholarships this fall to students who excel in the online multi-player game League of Legends.

The school in central Appalachia hopes the program will draw attention from prospective students who otherwise wouldn’t have considered U-Pike.

The school’s New Media Director, Bruce Parsons, believes it’s just a matter of time before more American universities offer scholarships to gamers.

“I think there’s a good opportunity for colleges and universities to look at starting e-sports programs at their schools—officially supported scholarship programs. It’s growing very quickly, there’s a lot of attention, and it offers opportunities to students who might not have athletic or others scholarships at their disposal.”

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