Education

Education
12:41 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Embracing the Role of "Campus Mom", a WKU Student Reflects Rising Number of Non-Traditionals

Samantha Johnson and her 15-year-old son, Drew
Credit Kevin Willis

Kevin's profile of WKU-Glasgow's Samantha Johnson, one of a growing number of non-traditional students across the nation.

Glasgow resident and full-time college student Samantha Johnson could serve as “exhibit A” of a growing trend being seen throughout America’s colleges and university campuses.

When Johnson enters a classroom at WKU-G, as the campus is known, she brings with her a lifetime of experiences that the average 18 to 22 year old lacks.

Johnson is a 45-year-old single-mother who knows what it’s like to brave the job market with only a high school diploma. She has raised two sons, experienced divorce, and survived a bout with cancer.

After all that, a 100-level psychology class looked like a piece of cake.

Non-traditional is Now the Norm

More than ever before, the face of the average U.S. college student looks more and more “non-traditional.” According to U.S. Education Department data, only 29% of the country’s 18 million undergraduates are what’s known as “traditional students”—those who graduated from high school and then enrolled full-time in four-year public or nonprofit colleges or universities.

Nearly one million undergraduates were at least 25, and nearly half a million were in their 30s or older.

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Education
8:03 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Gov. Haslam to Talk about Plans to Increase 2-Year Degrees in Tennessee

Gov. Bill Haslam is continuing to push an initiative to increase the number of Tennesseans with at least a two-year college degree or certificate.

The governor is scheduled to talk more about the "Drive to 55" plan at an event in Nashville on Wednesday.

He announced the initiative in his State of the State address earlier this year and has been working on it over the past months. He is expected to more clearly define the state's challenges on Wednesday, as well as give an update on its progress.

Currently, 32 percent of Tennesseans have a two-year degree or higher, and Haslam's goal is to raise that number to 55 percent by 2025.

Education
3:55 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

WKU Professor Takes Turn in Baseball Broadcast Booth

Dr. Stuart Foster

WKU Professor Stu Foster talks about his summer in the broadcast booth

The next time you listen to a baseball game on the radio, notice how many times the weather is referenced.

"The weather is certainly one part of trying to convey to the listener the scene of what's happening and the setting for the game and what might turn out to be an important component that affects the way the game turns out,” said Stu Foster, WKU professor, Kentucky state climatologist and part-time color commentator for the Bowling Green Hot Rods.

"Whether it's a clear, deep blue sky that might be a problem for outfielders, whether there's a strong breeze blowing in or out,” said Foster.  “We had a game recently where there was a heavy dew that came on the field as the game went on that could've come on to affect the game."

Foster said a few conversations last winter led to the opportunity to sit in on a dozen games as color commentator for the Midwest League affiliate of the Tampa Bay Rays. He says his weather expertise wasn’t the only part of his “day job” that helped ease his transition into the broadcast booth.

He says in both broadcasting and being a professor, the goal is the same: communicate a message with a large audience. 

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Education
11:25 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Kentucky Education Commissioner Says Early Test Results Promising

This year, Kentucky public schools could post their best results ever in two major categories the state measures for overall student progress.  

State Education Commissioner Terry Holliday is calling the early results promising.

The Kentucky Department of Education implemented its new accountability system in 2012. So this will be the first time Kentucky can measure its results against a previous year.

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Education
4:35 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Kentucky Education Commissioner Backs State Tax Reform

Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday is calling the next legislative session a “make or break year” for the state’s public school system.

“I think we’ve hit the wall for increasing student performance and without some reinvestment in public education I think kids are going to lose out.”

Holliday is asking state lawmakers to restore per student funding to their 2009 levels during  biennium budget discussions next year. He also says state grant funding needs to be restored. That will mean committing nearly $270 million dollars more to education for the next two years.

Holliday says the General Assembly can accomplish this through tax reforms and approving expanded gaming, two issues that have not made headway in the recent past.

Education will be competing with state pension and healthcare issues among the other state agencies that have seen cuts to their budgets.

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Education
7:00 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Beshear Announcing $41 Million Race to the Top Grant for Co-ops

Governor Beshear is announcing a major Race to the Top educational grant to several Kentucky school district cooperatives. The governor will be joined by state education commissioner Terry Holliday, the leaders of several educational co-ops, the Hart County Schools superintendent, and other education leaders.

A news release issued by the Governor’s office said Beshear will announce in Shelby County Monday morning $41 million in Race to the Top grant money to be shared by Kentucky school district co-ops.

Those groups include the Green River Regional Educational Cooperative, which includes districts across south-central Kentucky, and the Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative, a consortium of school districts in north-central Kentucky.

Twenty-two districts from those two co-ops joined in an application and were awarded one of the nation’s two largest District-Race to the Top grants.

Race to the Top is a federal education program created to spur innovation and reforms in state and local district K through 12 education.

Education
2:05 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Kentucky Education Chief Affirms Enrollment Cap Decision for Bowling Green, Warren County

Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday is affirming a decision to allow 750 Warren County students to attend Bowling Green city schools this academic year, according to a posting on the city schools' website.

Earlier this year, the Warren County school board lowered the cap on the number of county-zoned students allowed to attend city schools.  The city appealed the county’s decision to the state education commissioner. 

Following a three-day hearing last month, the hearing officer recommended to Holliday that the student cap be increased to 750 in the 2013-14 school year and the 2014-15 school years. 

Holliday’s order received Friday by the city school system only addresses this year.

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Education
10:59 am
Fri August 23, 2013

Ransdell Emphasizes Retention, Attracting High-Achieving Students During Convocation

WKU President Gary Ransdell addressed faculty and staff at the opening convocation on Aug. 23 at Van Meter Hall.
Credit WKU's Clinton Lewis

WKU President Gary Ransdell told faculty and staff that it's unlikely that significant new state funding for higher education will come from the next Kentucky budget.

Speaking at Friday's annual convocation, President Ransdell said the recent state funding declines make it all the more important for the school to attract the highest-achieving students possible, and do everything possible to see them through to graduation.

Ransdell said WKU is challenged by a drop in the number of high school graduates in the commonwealth.

"The number of U.S. high-school graduates peaked at 3.4 million in 2010-2011 and is projected to fall to 3.2 million by 2013-14, according to the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education. Kentucky is projected to have a 6.1 percent decline in the number of high school graduates by 2020," said Dr. Ransdell. 

"An era of aggressive tuition increases and enrollment growth strategies that carried us from 1998 to 2008 cannot serve us well going forward. We have penetrated well the Kentucky market place, but the paradigm has shifted. The numbers in Kentucky just are not there in the future."

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Education
3:25 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

WKU Health Sciences Complex at The Medical Center Officially Opens

Inside the WKU Health Sciences Complex at The Medical Center
Credit Joe Corcoran

The new WKU Health Sciences Complex at The Medical Center in Bowling Green will double the number of new nursing and physical therapy students graduating and entering the work force.

The first class of 80 nursing students begins classes Monday, Aug. 26.

WKU President Gary Ransdell told an audience at Thursday morning's official opening of the complex that as many as 360 students will be going through a variety of programs.

"This new building will house a bachelor's, master's, and a doctoral degree program in the WKU School of Nursing. And is will allow us to double the number of nursing students we accept every year, and the impact that will have on health care across our entire region is just profound," said Dr. Ransdell.

The first class of 30 students in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program began in June and just finished their first semester.

Education
2:23 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

Kentucky Launches Kindergarten Screening Statewide

Kentucky is implementing a statewide screening system for kindergarteners this year.  Governor Beshear, First Lady Jane Beshear, and Education Commissioner Terry Holliday made the announcement in Frankfort Thursday.

"As a former teacher, I understand how getting to know a student's needs and abilities early in the school year can make a big difference in helping that child to succeed," said Mrs. Beshear.

Every school district in the state will use the Brigance Kindergarten Screener, a tool used by many states to gauge a child's school readiness.  Courtney Daniel in the Governor's Office of Early Childhood says a student cannot fail the screening.

"The screener is a moment in time snapshot of the child's development," Daniel explained.  "It's not an entrance exam for kindergarten, and it's not going to be used to track or label children."

The screening system was piloted in 109 Kentucky school districts last year.  Data collected from those districts indicate that a majority of children are socially and emotionally ready to enter kindergarten.  However, many students did not achieve at high levels in the areas of cognition, language, and motor skills.

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