Education

After several years, a bill allowing charter schools in Kentucky has received a hearing in a House committee. Advocates for and against the measure spent Tuesday debating the merits of the education reform in the capitol. Charter school administrators from other states joined Rep. Brad Montell, the bill’s sponsor, and Kentucky Chamber of Commerce president Dave Adkission in support of the bill.

KCTCS

African-American churches across Kentucky are participating in "Super Sunday" events, designed to help increase the college-going rates of minority students. Each of the sixteen colleges in the KCTCS system is partnering with churches in their communities to host college information fairs today for prospective college students and their families.

The Superintendent of Hardin County Schools says the No Child Left Behind waiver given to Kentucky will allow the state to better judge how students are progressing academically. Nannette Johnston told WKU Public Radio that the federal law was an overly simplistic “pass or fail” model. She believes the state’s new system will give schools credit for the success they have in helping individual students.

A proposal to raise Kentucky’s dropout age to 18 years old has passed a major hurdle. The state Senate has approved a bill that allows individual school districts to decide whether to raise the dropout age and requires participating schools to have alternative education programs.

The bill passed overwhelming, 35-2 Wednesday, with two Democratic senators voting against because of the local option. Republican Senator Julie Denton also didn’t like the local option, but she voted in favor of the measure.

Kentucky, Indiana, and Tennessee have been granted a waiver from federal No Child Left Behind education standards. NCLB has been criticized for setting unreachable goals for education. Kentucky was one of 11 states that applied for the waiver last fall and promised to make other commitments to school reform.

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