Education

An Indiana University study has found that what people studied in college had a direct effect on their chances of employment during the recession. People with degrees in health, education and biology/life sciences had the best chance of getting and holding a job in 2009 and 2010, according to the recent study by the Indiana Business Research Center at IU’s Kelley School of Business.

An anonymous donor has given $200,000 to enable a western Kentucky public library provide free books to children every month. The Kentucky New Era reported Friday the donation will help establish a Dolly Parton Imagination Library project through the Hopkinsville-Christian County Public Library.

The head of the U.S. Department of Justice's civil rights division is heading to Lexington to talk to hundreds of high school freshmen about bullying and harassment. Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez is scheduled to give a speech and participate in a panel discussion for Fayette County freshmen on Wednesday.

Gov. Steve Beshear has signed an executive order that will couple the state's career and technical schools under the Department of Education. The goal is to create a unified and efficient system to better prepare students for blue collar careers.

WKU President Gary Ransdell says student retention will continue to be a top priority at the institution in the upcoming academic year and over the next six years. Speaking at the faculty and staff convocation in Van Meter Hall, the University President said the state and university can no longer afford to have about one thousand freshmen students per year fail to return for their second year of study.

Kentucky's public high school seniors scored higher on the ACT college entrance exam than a year ago, but their performance remained below the national average, education officials said Wednesday. The average composite ACT score rose to 19.5 for Kentucky's public high school Class of 2012, up from 19.2 in 2011, according to data released by the state Department of Education.

A fifteen passenger van has been donated to the Kelly Autism Program, which is part of the Suzanne Vitale Clinical Education Complex at WKU.  Officals at the University say the vehicle was donated by Chevrolet and the GM Corvette Plant. Director Marty Boman says the vehicle has already been put to use for several special activities and field trips which give participants in the program a chance to experience new activities.

Kevin Willis

WKU's freshmen are learning what it's like to get up for an 8 a.m. class. The M.A.S.T.E.R Plan orientation program for first-year students is underway Monday at the campus in Bowling Green. Students will attend sessions dealing with issues like time management, study skills, and getting along with people who look and think differently that you.

About 140 new international students are expected to arrive at WKU by August 21st. University officials say a number of activities have been planned to help those students undergo an effective orientation plan, to help them adjust to campus life in the U.S.

Sumner County, Tennessee students will start classes Thursday, following a nearly two week delay over school funding issues. The issue was resolved at last night’s meeting of the Sumner County Board of Education.

During a Wednesday morning meeting with faculty and staff at Eastern Kentucky University, President Doug Whitlock announced his retirement.  Whitlock, who has spent his entire higher education career at EKU, says his administration will end at the conclusion of this academic year.

Kentucky Chamber Foundation

The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, in partnership with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the State Department of Education, is promoting dialogue about the future of education in the Commonwealth. The business organization says the goal of creating a more highly-skilled workforce will depend upon the success of new education initiatives in the state.

Owensboro Community and Technical College is filling a need in the field of veterinary medicine. The school on Tuesday announced a $475,000 grant to establish a two-year veterinary technician program.  

Kevin Willis

Margaret Munday is a woman who is both a pioneer, and an eyewitness to an amazing time in Kentucky history. Ms. Munday helped change the course of higher education in south-central Kentucky, and Western Kentucky University in particular. In 1956, she became the first African-American undergraduate student to enroll in what was then called Western Kentucky State College.

Kentucky's teachers are being pushed to find more resources online as more and more textbooks become outdated and are not being replaced. The problem comes from an unforgiving state budget that has not allowed for full funding of textbooks in several years.

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