Education

A group of about twenty WKU students are participating in a homelessness simulation this weekend. They met at the Garrett Conference Center on the WKU campus last night to start the activity. Organizers say those who participate are learning about the realities of poverty in the world.

The Council on Post Secondary Education has approved a tuition increase of up to six percent for students attending the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville this fall. Board members also approved a tuition hike of up to five percent for students attending WKU and other comprehensive universities in the bluegrass state.

WKU Chess Club

A Chess Grandmaster from Russia will deliver a lecture on "The Correlations between the Thinking Processes of Chess and Science" as part of this year's WKU Open Chess Tournament. Valdimir Malakhov will speak Friday April 20th, at 6pm in Gary Ransdell Hall.

NKU

The Board of Regents at Northern Kentucky University have voted unanimously to make Geoffrey Mearns the next President at NKU. Mearns, who is currently the Provost and  Senior Vice-President of Academic Affairs at Cleveland State, previously worked as Dean and Professor of Law at Cleveland State's Cleveland-Marshall College of Law.

More than 80 education leaders from across Kentucky are expected to attend a statewide summit next week to learn more about "best practices" in scheduling classroom space. The issue has become increasingly important as energy costs have risen and budgets have grown tighter.  The summit will be held in Versailles, at KCTCS  offices. Dr. Tony Honeycutt, the Provost of Somerset Community College, spoke with WKU Public Radio about the story.

The Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education is issuing a consumer alert about fake GED tests.  The notice relates to fraudulent websites claiming to offer high school and GED diplomas for a fee through the internet.

When the current Kentucky legislative session ends this week, many issues will be left on the table for the future including the issue of charter schools. Kentucky is among just nine states without charters and the push to change that has been polarizing in Frankfort.

Tennessee is seeing an increased number of proposals for charter schools. The rise in applications is largely due to a recent change in state law that no longer limits charters to low-income students from failing classrooms. The Tennessean reports that in Nashville alone eleven groups have applied to create new charter school operations.

An idea that developed from a panel discussion at an educational conference has resulted in a "services fair" for the refugee and immigrant populations in the region. Organizers of the event say they plan to make it an annual event, providing health services and information to people from a wide range of cultures. Dan Modlin spoke with Skip Cleavinger, the Director of English Learner Programs for Warren County Schools.

An effort by Governor Steve Beshear to expand preschool services in the commonwealth did not make it into the final state budget.

Beshear put a $15 million appropriation for preschool in his budget proposal. The House cut that figure in half and funded other education programs with what was left. The Senate struck all the money, saying it wouldn't be right to expand some programs while slashing others.

And after days of budget talks, the Senate won the argument.

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