Education

Dr. Brian Fagan, Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Santa Barbara, will give a "Reach Week" lecture on the WKU campus on March 21st. Fagan is the author of the best selling book, "The Great Warming:Climate Change and the Rise and Fall of Civilizations." He has done extensive research on the ways civilization has adapted to climate change in the past.  His lecture in Van Meter Auditorium will be free and open to the public.   Dr. Fagan talks with Dan Modlin..........

WKU History Department

WKU History Professor John Hardin, who specializes in African American History, will appear tonight on the NBC television network program, "Who Do You Think You Are?"  Dr. Hardin helped to research the family history of former Pittsburgh Steeler running back Jerome Bettis, the family story that will be traced in tonight's program.  The story has roots in slavery in western Kentucky.  Dan Modlin has more.......

LRC

Lawmakers have reached a compromise on a proposal to create more educational opportunities in eastern Kentucky.

House Speaker Greg Stumbo has been advocating to move the University of Pikeville into the state university system. But that proposal doesn’t currently have the support to become reality, which forces supporters to adopt a compromise.

Given the potential of unusually severe weather this afternoon, the WKU Main and South Campuses will close at 12:30 p.m. today.  The Glasgow campus will close at 1 p.m. Central, and the Elizabethtown/Radcliff/Fort Knox campuses at 1 p.m. Eastern. We are awaiting a possible announcement from the Director of the Owensboro campus. 

A new bill in Kentucky would allow students to go to school outside of the district they live in, as long the new district allows it. State Senator Ken Winters is sponsoring the bill because of concerns he's heard from parents in his district. He says the measure isn’t aimed at getting students out of low-performing schools, but is instead tailored to parents who commute outside their home county.

WKU Public Radio

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto says looming budget cuts are a serious concern for higher education across Kentucky. He says a large percentage of college students in Kentucky are already borrowing money to attend classes, and he says higher tuition rates aren't the answer for funding problems. He spoke with Dan Modlin.

A Christian County lawmaker wants to create a statewide program that would encourage pre-schoolers to develop a love of books. Hopkinsville Representative John Tilley’s bill has cleared the House Education Committee, and is something he calls “Books for Brain”.

A bill creating an alternative diploma for special needs students is one vote away from becoming law. Senate Bill 43 would apply different core standards to qualified students who would then earn the alternative diploma. Currently, special needs students in Kentucky receive only a certificate when they graduate.

The chairman of the House Education Committee says his modifications to a dropout bill will help broker a compromise between the House and the Senate. Both chambers recently passed legislation effectively raising Kentucky’s high school dropout age, but there are key differences between the bills.

Currently, students can’t drop out of high school on their own until they’re 18 years old. But with parental consent, they can drop out at age 16.

The Administrative Council at Western Kentucky University has approved a scholarship program that is expected to help more than seven hundred students reduce their costs for summer school this year. The program applies to undergraduate students with a 3.0 GPA or higher, who take at least six hours during Summer Sessions 2012.

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