Education

Education
9:37 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Kentucky Education Board Considers New Teacher Evaluations

The Kentucky Board of Education is getting closer to voting on new evaluations for teachers and principals.

The panel said the new system would hold teachers accountable in new ways that would be consistent across the state. Currently, different school districts use different means of evaluating educators. 

The proposal before the board would use a variety of means, including student test scores and observations by peers and supervisors, to rate teachers as exemplary, accomplished, developing or ineffective.

The Lexington Herald-Leader reports the board will hold a work session in April before voting on the measure.

Education
5:14 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Thursday Weather Causes Delayed Openings at WKU Campuses

WKU Elizabethtown/Fort Know campus will open at 10:00 a.m. EST Thursday.

WKU's Glasgow campus will open at 11:00 a.m. CST.

Caution is urged while traveling around the area.

Education
4:16 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Glasgow Woman to Join Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame

Golda Pensol Walbert
Credit WKU Media Relations

A retired educator from south central Kentucky helps make up the 2014 class of the Kentucky Teacher Hall of Fame. 

Golda Walbert of Glasgow will be inducted in a ceremony in Frankfort Thursday. 

She began her teaching career in a one-room schoolhouse in Rockcastle County in 1943.  Walbert later taught in Harlan County before spending most of her career in Barren County schools.   

The Teacher Hall of Fame, housed at WKU, was created in 2000 through a gift by former Kentucky Governor Louie B. Nunn.

Find out more on the 2014 inductees here.

Education
5:38 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

Student Fee to Create Main Source of Funding For Upgrades To KCTCS Campuses

Dr. Michael McCall
Credit KCTCS

Kentucky's community colleges will use new tuition fees to pay for improvements to campuses across the commonwealth.

The sixteen colleges of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System will take on about $200 million in bonds. System President Michael McCall says three-fourths of those bonds will be paid for by a four dollar per credit hour charge that will be phased in this fall, and will increase to eight dollars per credit hour in the future.

“The proposed agency fund will come from a capital fee that will be assessed to students, students who will be coming in,” said McCall. “We plan to really phase this in. The total amount that will be required for this would be eight dollars per credit hour per student.”

McCall acknowledges that KCTCS will also be raising tuition this fall, but could not say by how much.

About 92,000 students are enrolled in the system's colleges.

Education
1:40 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

More than Half of Kentucky Kindergartners Were Unprepared to Learn Reading, Math Skills

A new statewide reading survey shows roughly half of Kentucky’s kindergartners entered school this year unprepared to learn the reading and math skills that are expected of them.

The survey shows 51-percent of Kentucky kindergartners who began school last fall were described as “not ready” to learn the basic reading and math skills expected of them. That means those students lacked basic literacy, match, or cognitive skills, such as knowing letters and numbers. The social and physical readiness of the students were also taken into account.

You can read more about the survey results here.

Governor Steve Beshear, who has proposed expanding early childhood initiatives in the state, said the report showed how some students are at a disadvantage “from day one.”

In a statement, the Governor said too often those students who begin school academically behind their peers never catch up, and face poor grades and negative school experiences that “usually only end when they drop out or graduate from high school unprepared for college or career.”

Education
4:20 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Warren County Schools Go Mobile With Communications App

Warren County Public Schools is now offering a mobile application that allows the community to get information in a quick and convenient way.   

The mobile app from School Connect allows smartphone and tablet users to keep track of district news and receive notices from faculty and staff, all in real time.  Much of the information is already posted on the school system's website.

"It just gives us another way for community members to access information about the district in a convenient with mobile apps being the way of the world these days, it seems," says WCPS Spokesman Don Sergent.

The app will provide information such as school calendars, athletic schedules, gradebooks, and lunch menus. 

The free app is available for Apple and Android devices.

Education
9:16 pm
Sun January 26, 2014

WKU Students Experience Sundance Film Festival

The WKU contingent that attended this year's Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.
Credit WKU @ Sundance Blog

The Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah is known not only for showcasing independent films, and bringing together movie-types like actors, directors and filmmakers – but also for its generous amounts of snowfall and chilly temperatures.

For 23 WKU students including Jayme Powell, the Sundance experience was one that can’t be replicated in south-central Kentucky.

That is, with the possible exception of the weather.

“When we got back last night, it was colder in Kentucky,” said Powell on Saturday afternoon.  “But it was cold in Park City. We were bundled up a lot.”

Powell , an aspiring film producer says she saw 22 films at Sundance.  Many of her days started as early as 8:30 or 9 o’clock in the morning and often ended hours later with a midnight showing.  She also spent much of her time attending panel discussions with filmmakers and producers.

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Education
6:00 am
Sat January 25, 2014

Why Do Students Drop Out of WKU? MAP-Works Is Looking for Answers

WKU administrators are hoping the MAP-Works system increases student retention rates.
Credit Kevin Willis

A program being used at WKU is providing a better idea of what can be done to prevent students from leaving school before completing their degree.

The MAP-Works system helps identify at-risk students who take a voluntary survey. Students who appear to be struggling receive direct intervention by WKU faculty and staff who direct the student to programs that can help with academic, financial, or health issues.

Lindsey Gilmore, with the WKU enrollment management office, says she assumed money problems would be the top reason why students drop out. But she says MAP-Works shows that’s not the case.

"Generally, what MAP-Works does is let us see about five top issues our students are facing per classification, and lack of financial confidence is always in the top five, but it’s never number one."

Gilmore says MAP-Works shows the biggest stressors for WKU students include homesickness, test anxiety, study habits, and low peer connections.

More than 5,400 WKU students have been contacted or met with in person this academic year about their survey results. Gilmore says the school is working to get more students to take the MAP-Works survey. A little over 27 percent of WKU students completed the survey last fall.

Education
12:52 pm
Fri January 24, 2014

Ransdell: WKU Not Expecting Big Tuition Hike to Counteract Proposed State Funding Cuts

WKU President Gary Ransdell
Credit WKU

The President of WKU says he’s not counting on a big tuition increase to help offset a proposed cut in state funding for universities.

Dr. Gary Ransdell says he believes the Council on Postsecondary Education will cap the next round of potential tuition increases at about three percent.

That’s the increase the CPE set last April for in-state undergraduate students beginning this fall. President Ransdell told WKU Public Radio that it’s probably not realistic to expect anything more than that.

“Even if the CPE would allow a higher number, we’re not likely to go there,” Dr. Ransdell said during a break in Friday’s Board of Regents meeting. “So we’re going to have a modest tuition increase. Every year there’s going to be a tuition increase. It will simply cover our fixed-cost increases. These other items are going to have to be funded in some other way—probably through redirection of funds within our budget.”

The proposed budget announced by Governor Beshear this week includes a 2.5 percent spending reduction for state universities, which amounts to a loss of $1.8 million for WKU in fiscal year 2015.

Kentucky minimum wage increase?

A proposed increase in Kentucky’s minimum wage would add an estimated $419,000 to WKU's current payroll obligations. Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo is sponsoring legislation that would boost the state’s minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, up from the current $7.25 an hour.

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Education
2:46 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Computer Programming Course Would Count as Foreign Language Class Under Kentucky Bill

A bill that would allow computer programming courses to count toward foreign language requirements in Kentucky schools has passed out of a Senate committee.

Republican Sen. David Givens of Greensburg sponsored the measure and told the committee it's needed to prepare Kentucky’s students for a modern economy.

“Part of the challenge goes to the fact that less than 2.4 percent of college students graduate with a degree in computer science, and the numbers continue to decline as the job opportunities increase."

Givens also says his bill would help close a knowledge gap for women and minorities, groups he says are under-represented in the fields of computer science.

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