education

Education
2:44 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

WKU's Ransdell: U.S. Schools Need to Grow International Student Populations--While They Still Can

WKU President Gary Ransdell
Credit WKU

WKU President Gary Ransdell is confident the school will be able to grow its international student body over the next several decades.

But he admits it will become more difficult to do so as countries such as China and India become wealthier and begin to build more of their own universities.

“There are not enough colleges and universities to meet the needs in an awful lot of the countries that have growing economies and growing populations. Therefore, we’re a solution," the WKU President said. "Now, in another generation—in another 25 or 30 years—they may have built enough universities to meet their needs.”

Dr. Ransdell says WKU is actively recruiting in several countries where the school has previously not had a presence.

“South America is really an emerging market for higher education," Ransdell said during a break in Friday's Board of Regents meeting. "We’re looking at as many as 90 students from Brazil next year. We’re always looking for new markets. Turkey is an emerging market for us. Their economy is doing great, and their families are looking for a place to send their sons and daughters.”

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Education
12:24 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

WKU Actively Recruiting Mid-Continent Students Following Announcement that School is Closing

Mid-Continent University will officially close June 30.
Credit Mid-Continent University

WKU is working to recruit students from a school in far western Kentucky that is closing at the end of June.  

Mid-Continent University in Mayfield announced this week that it will shutter due to financial struggles. All employees have been laid off, though many faculty members have volunteered to continue helping students who are set to graduate this semester.

WKU Provost Gordon Emslie says the school has been working since the announcement to reach out to Mid-Continent students.

“We’re offering students the ability to transfer here, we’ll waive the application fee, we’ll match their courses in their catalogue to our courses in our catalogue, to try to facilitate that transfer as much as possible," Emslie told WKU Public Radio Friday. "We’ll work with them on tuition and scholarships, and financial aid. And we’re going to go out to Mayfield someday next week.”

Emslie said a website has also been set up to help Mid-Continent students learn more about transferring to WKU.

Mid-Continent is a non-profit university with about two-thousand students. Most are non-traditional and take online courses.

The Office of the Kentucky Attorney General has also set up a website dedicated to helping Mid-Continent students. In addition, the AG’s office sent letters to Mid-Continent administrators reminding them of their obligation to maintain all records as the school prepares to close.

Regional
9:36 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Corbin Student to Represent Bluegrass State at National Geographic Bee

A Corbin eighth-grader will be traveling to Washington, D.C., next month to represent Kentucky in the national finals of the National Geographic Bee.

Nikhil A. Krishna, who attends Corbin Middle School, won the 2014 Kentucky Geographic Bee in Bowling Green. Louisville Farnsley Middle School student Andruw T. Stewart took second place, and third place went to a student from Lexington's Winburn Middle School, Zsombor T. Gal. They were among 82 students competing Friday.

The winner received $100 and a paid trip to Washington for the national finals May 19 to 21.

First prize in the national competition is a $50,000 college scholarship and a trip to the Galapagos Islands, with $25,000 and $10,000 scholarships to the next two finishers.

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Education
11:41 am
Tue March 25, 2014

As Negotiations Enter Crucial Phase, Budget Funding for Higher Ed, University Projects Unclear

The Gatton Academy for Math and Science is housed at WKU.
Credit WKU NPR

The budget passed by the Kentucky Senate this week has mixed news for WKU. Money for a capital project at the school was removed while other WKU-related funds were left intact.

The Senate’s budget deleted funding for most university capital projects, including bonds to fund a renovation of the Thompson Complex Center Wing, home to numerous WKU science classes.

However, the Senate budget does include funding for the Gatton Academy for Math and Science to support 80 additional students beginning in 2015.

The budget passed by the House includes bond funding for the Thompson Complex project and money to expand the Gatton Academy. But it also contains a 2.5 percent cut to higher education funding.

The Senate spending plan restored that higher education funding cut at the expense of most university capital projects.

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Education
9:43 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Rupp Arena Beckons for Students at Schools Competing in Sweet 16

The Kentucky Boys Sweet 16 champion will crowned Sunday afternoon in Lexington.
Credit KHSAA

Attendance at some schools in our listening area could be light today and tomorrow--but not because of weather.

The Kentucky Boys Sweet 16 basketball tournament gets underway Wednesday in Lexington, and many students from participating schools will be at Rupp Arena, as opposed to the classroom.

Bowling Green High School plays its first round game tomorrow afternoon against Knott County Central. Bowling Green High Principal Gary Fields says his school system understands that attending the tournament is a great experience for students.

"We didn't want to dismiss school, so what we're doing is if a student buys a ticket and travels with their parents or family friends, then they are excused from school that day. It is an absence. We're required to count them absent, but it's an excused absence," Fields told WKU Public Radio.

Fields says calling off school wasn't an option, especially since Bowling Green has missed five days already due to winter weather. Several county school systems in our region have missed a dozen or more days.

Other schools in our listening area competing in the Sweet 16 are Bardstown, Hopkinsville, Owensboro, and Wayne County.

Education
3:38 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Southern Kentucky Superintendent Open to Idea of Year-Round School

North Jackson Elementary is one of the Barren County schools that has missed 16 days due to winter weather.
Credit Barren County Schools

The superintendent of Barren County Schools says he would be willing to consider the idea of year-round school.

The concept has come up recently following several episodes of harsh winter weather that led many school systems to cancel classes over a dozen times.

Barren County Superintendent Bo Matthews says it might be a good idea to think about officially shortening the summer break, since it is often gets impacted by make-up days caused by bad weather.

"The summer break, if you will, continues to get smaller if you look at school calendars around the state,” Matthews told WKU Public Radio. “So, in some respects, it wouldn't be a stretch to see us begin to creep further into the month of June."

Barren County has missed 16 days this school year due to bad winter weather. Lawrence County has missed 32.

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Education
11:03 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Givens: Allowing Computer Programming to Count as Foreign Language Would Create "Job Opportunities"

Sen. David Givens is sponsoring a bill that would allow computer programming courses to count for foreign language credit in Kentucky high schools.
Credit Kentucky LRC

Senator David Givens says he understands that some people may get the wrong idea when they hear about legislation he is proposing concerning computer science and foreign language classes.

A bill Givens is sponsoring in the Kentucky General Assembly would allow computer programming courses to count towards a high school student’s foreign language requirements. The measure also ensures that computer programming language courses be accepted as meeting foreign language requirements for admission to public postsecondary institutions.

The Green County Republican insists that he doesn’t have anything against students learning a foreign language. He says his bill is simply a response to an increasing demand in today’s job market.

“We have a shortage of computer programmers in the United States,” the Green County Republican said while sitting in his office at the state capitol in Frankfort. “By the year 2020, the projection is that we will have one-million unfilled computer programming jobs. So the challenge is how do we, in Kentucky, provide opportunities for students and flexibility for schools to be able to take advantage of that, of those job opportunities.”

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Education
8:49 am
Sat March 1, 2014

Henderson County Program Helping Troubled Youth, Could Serve as Model for Other Areas

A Henderson County program that helps troubled high school students turn their lives around is getting statewide attention because of its success rate.

Since the Center for Youth Justice Services opened a year and a half ago at Henderson County High School, it has served about 130 students and cut down the number referred to court. The center offers services for behavioral, family and school-related problems.

Student Le-Onta Carey told The Gleaner that the center gave her the support and resources she needed to turn her life around. She says last year, she was struggling in classes and on the path to court. Now, she has clear goals and direction.

Steve Steiner, who is director of pupil personnel at Henderson County schools, says there is interest in expanding the program to other schools.

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Education
7:56 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Kentucky Teachers Would be Paid for Two Hours of Non-Teaching Activities a Week Under Bill

The Kentucky House has overwhelmingly approved a bill requiring teachers to be paid for a minimum of 120 minutes a week for non-teaching activities. 

Bill sponsor Rita Smart says having adequate planning time in the daily schedule seems to be a bigger issue for elementary teachers.

“But, what we found that almost all high school and middle school teachers get more than that, many high school teachers get an hour, 60 minutes, but elementary teachers were not getting, in some districts no planning time," the Richmond Democrat said.

The bill sets out the daily allotted time to be a minimum of 24 minutes.  The measure, which goes on to the Senate, passed by a vote of 85 to 8 on Friday.

Education
2:29 am
Tue February 18, 2014

College Applicants Sweat The SATs. Perhaps They Shouldn't

Standardized tests are an important consideration for admissions at many colleges and universities. But one new study shows that high school performance, not standardized test scores, is a better predictor of how students do in college.
Amriphoto iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 4:26 pm

With spring fast approaching, many American high school seniors are now waiting anxiously to hear whether they got into the college or university of their choice. For many students, their scores on the SAT or the ACT will play a big role in where they get in.

That's because those standardized tests remain a central part in determining which students get accepted at many schools. But a first-of-its-kind study obtained by NPR raises questions about whether those tests are becoming obsolete.

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