education

Close your eyes for a minute and daydream about a world without bubble tests.

Education Week recently reported that some Republican Senate aides are doing more than dreaming — they're drafting a bill that would eliminate the federal mandate on standardized testing.

Kentucky’s higher education officials are urging students preparing to enter college this fall—or who are already enrolled—to turn in financial aid documents soon after the opening period begins Jan. 1.

“If someone is on the fence a little bit about where they want to go or what they want to do, if they don’t apply until March, it’s too late,” said Erin Klarer of the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority, the state agency that oversees Kentucky’s financial aid.

Why does public school start at age 5?

Declines in state appropriations and negative financial trends have made American universities rely more on alumni and wealthy benefactors for cash donations.

Little children are big news this week, as the White House holds a summit on early childhood education on Wednesday. The president wants every 4-year-old to go to preschool, but the new Congress is unlikely to foot that bill.

Since last year, more than 30 states have expanded access to preschool. But there's still a lack of evidence about exactly what kinds of interventions are most effective in those crucial early years.

A recent report from the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth says the state needs to invest more in early childhood education.

The study released this week recommends expanding the state's voluntary pre-K program to all at-risk Tennessee children.

The program has not been expanded since 2008. Established in 1999, the program has 935 classrooms serving about 18,500 children.

The commission says research shows pre-K programs help children develop the cognitive, social and emotional skills they need to learn.

Higher education, preschool funding, the Common Core and the future of No Child Left Behind are just a few of the education policies that will be in play under the new Republican-controlled Congress. How will these things change? We called Sen. Lamar Alexander to ask.

At their regular meeting Monday night, the Warren County school board voted to appeal, for the fourth time, a ruling by the Kentucky Board of Education concerning the on-going non-resident student dispute with the Bowling Green school district.

In a press release sent out after the meeting, Superintendent Rob Clayton said the vote was really a technicality. He said it doesn't necessarily mean any more legal action will be taken just yet but it gives them that option should upcoming mandated mediation between the two school boards fail.

The Kentucky Department of Education is receiving $8.1 million through a five year federal grant to help teachers, schools and communities recognize and respond to mental health problems in young people.

The Department says the program will be first piloted in three school districts including Pulaski County public schools. A grant was also awarded to the Henderson County school district.

The state education department says the program will focus on two elements. The first will provide local communities with increased access to school and community based mental health services. The second will involve training school personnel, first responders and others to recognize mental health needs of young people.

The Kentucky Department of Education is asking for feedback on proposed standards for social studies and arts and humanities.

The Herald-Leader reports Kentuckians can register their thoughts through December 5.

The proposed changes are a result of legislation passed by the Kentucky General Assembly in 2009 that required the state to update academic content standards in all subjects.

Kentucky was the first state to adopt the Common Core State Standards Initiative. New English and math standards have been in place since 2011, followed by a new science curriculum.

If approved, the new social studies and arts and humanities standards would be introduced during the 2015-16 school year.

Those interested in reviewing the proposed standards and offering feedback can do so by clicking on these links:

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