education

At their regular meeting Monday night, the Warren County school board voted to appeal, for the fourth time, a ruling by the Kentucky Board of Education concerning the on-going non-resident student dispute with the Bowling Green school district.

In a press release sent out after the meeting, Superintendent Rob Clayton said the vote was really a technicality. He said it doesn't necessarily mean any more legal action will be taken just yet but it gives them that option should upcoming mandated mediation between the two school boards fail.

The Kentucky Department of Education is receiving $8.1 million through a five year federal grant to help teachers, schools and communities recognize and respond to mental health problems in young people.

The Department says the program will be first piloted in three school districts including Pulaski County public schools. A grant was also awarded to the Henderson County school district.

The state education department says the program will focus on two elements. The first will provide local communities with increased access to school and community based mental health services. The second will involve training school personnel, first responders and others to recognize mental health needs of young people.

The Kentucky Department of Education is asking for feedback on proposed standards for social studies and arts and humanities.

The Herald-Leader reports Kentuckians can register their thoughts through December 5.

The proposed changes are a result of legislation passed by the Kentucky General Assembly in 2009 that required the state to update academic content standards in all subjects.

Kentucky was the first state to adopt the Common Core State Standards Initiative. New English and math standards have been in place since 2011, followed by a new science curriculum.

If approved, the new social studies and arts and humanities standards would be introduced during the 2015-16 school year.

Those interested in reviewing the proposed standards and offering feedback can do so by clicking on these links:

WKU

WKU is hoping to attract those over the age of 50 to a new organization that will offer classes ranging from financial planning to art history.

The Society for Lifelong Learning at WKU will begin offering non-credit courses next March, with the curriculum largely based on member input. The WKU group is modeling its efforts on more than 500 other lifelong learning institutes throughout the country.

Society member Frank Kersting says many of those surveyed indicated they would like to take classes that help explain major events and issues they’ve faced during their lifetimes.

“We found that individuals here would like to have courses that reflect their generation. So a lot of the classes will deal with who we were, back when we were younger.”

Kersting says the classes will not involve grades or papers, and are intended to be pressure-free.  

“We are not only going to offer courses every semester that address a variety of interests that individuals over 50 have, but also provide a social network for individuals to meet other people of like mind and interests,” he told WKU Public Radio.

The Society for Lifelong Learning is holding an open house this Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Knicely Conference Center in Bowling Green.

PBS

The man known as “The Science Guy” is coming to WKU Wednesday evening. Scientist, author, and former PBS show host Bill Nye will speak at E.A. Diddle Arena as part of the WKU Cultural Enhancement Series.

Nye is a passionate spokesman for science education in the U.S., and he often warns his audiences that the country faces the threat of losing its reputation as the leading global innovator unless it starts putting greater emphasis on teaching young people science and math.

In February, Nye made headlines when he came to northern Kentucky to debate Ken Ham, the president of the group “Answers in Genesis” that operates the Creation Museum in Petersburg.

See the entire debate between Bill Nye and Ken Ham here.

Ahead of his appearance in Bowling Green, Nye spoke to WKU Public Radio about science and religion, and what he thinks is the biggest long-term impact of the U.S. underperforming in science and math education.

WKU Public Radio: What do you think will happen to the U.S. if we don’t put greater emphasis on science education?

Nye: The U.S. economy will flag. It will fail. What keeps the United States in the game economically is not our manufacturing, as such—it’s our innovation. It’s our new ideas. This is the reason the U.S. is still doing very well economically around the world, even though all the stuff we wear is made somewhere else, and the cars we drive are largely made elsewhere.

Daymar Colleges Group

A for-profit college targeted by Kentucky’s Attorney General says it will close its Louisville operations, and is seeking to transfer its students.

The announcement is the latest bad news for Owensboro-based Daymar Colleges Group.

The Courier-Journal reports Daymar has submitted a closure plan to its accrediting body that would lead to the shuttering of its classrooms, and transfer most of its 89 Louisville-area students to other schools, or Daymar’s online program.

Daymar runs more than a dozen campuses in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Ohio, with around 2,000 students. Daymar has recently closed operations in Scottsville and the western Kentucky town of Clinton, and has sold--or is trying to sell--buildings in Owensboro and Louisville.

WKU

Kentucky’s Council on Postsecondary Education and university presidents are working to craft proposed changes to the state’s higher education funding formula.

The CPE and school leaders can’t change the funding formula on their own. Such a move would have to be approved by state lawmakers. But university and CPE leaders meet on a monthly basis, and a major topic of discussion recently has been a proposal to include “performance funding.”

Such a plan could potentially reward schools based on factors such as enrollment levels, graduation rates, or efforts in closing achievement gaps. Any effort at instituting performance funding, however, is likely contingent on lawmakers increasing the overall amount of higher education funding.

The Courier-Journal reports University of Louisville President James Ramsey sent a letter to the CPE last month saying he would only support performance-based funding if it came with new money.

Centre College

Centre College in Danville is unveiling a new scholarship program endowed by the largest single gift ever given to the school.

J. David and Marlene Grissom of Louisville have agreed to fund a four-year, full tuition scholarship that will go to ten first-generation college students each year beginning in the fall of 2015. J. David Grissom is a Centre graduate who served as chairman of the school’s board of trustees for two decades.

The total amount of the gift isn’t being made public, but Centre officials say it’s the largest ever received in the Danville school’s 195 year history.

Centre’s Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid, Bob Nesmith, says the school is already recruiting the first class of Grissom Scholars.

Madisonville Community College has reached a fifth of its goal towards a Murray State University Postsecondary Education building on campus. 

Flickr Creative Commons

WKU wants to convince more middle and high school girls to pursue classes in the STEM fields. More than 200 area girls in grades 5-12 will be on campus Saturday, Sept. 6, for the Girls in Science Day event.

The effort will focus on helping girls explore fields of study in science, technology, engineering, and math. Program coordinator Melissa Rudloff says many girls who initially excel in science-related classes take fewer of those courses as they get older.

“Research tells us that going back to elementary and middle school, many of those girls who may have entered those professions definitely had interest and ability in those fields. But somewhere along the way they become channeled in different directions. And many may do that themselves, or maybe it’s through the lack of experiences they have,” said Rudloff, who is the Professional-In-Residence at WKU’s SKyTeach program, which instructs future middle and high school math and science teachers.

One of the events at the Girls in Science Day gathering will be a talk led by Cheryl Stevens, Dean of the Ogden College of Science and Engineering. Rudloff believes it’s extremely important for girls to meet women who have succeeded in science-related fields.

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