Election

Kentucky's attorney general is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down an Ohio law that he thinks suppresses the vote.  Andy Beshear’s action is aimed at preventing a similar law in the commonwealth.

Under the Ohio law, citizens are removed from the voter rolls if they fail to cast a ballot during any two-year period.  Supporters say the move improves the accuracy of voter rolls. 

Given there are no Kentucky elections this year, Beshear says a similar law could disenfranchise every Kentuckian who failed to vote in 2016 by barring them from casting ballots in 2018.  He says certain voters would be disproportionately excluded, such as minorities, low-income, and disabled voters. 

Daviess County

Daviess County is expecting a record turnout on Election Day that could go as high as 70 percent of registered voters.

Daviess County’s chief election officer, Richard House, says the anticipated high voter turnout is due to a combination of national, state and local races that are generating a lot of interest.

“I think both sides are really polarized as far as the presidential race is concerned. We have several State House races here in Daviess County that are competitive. We’re going to have a new mayor. We’re going to have new city commissioners. So we have a lot of local interest in this race.”

Lots of candidates have stepped up to the plate in Daviess County. Five are running for mayor of Owensboro. Ten people are running for four seats on the Owensboro City Commission.

“We also have our first family court judge and there are four candidates running really competitive races,” said House. “That’s a non-partisan office and it’s the first time we’ve ever had a family court judge. So that’s been drawing a lot of attention.”

Expectations of high voter turnout are leading Daviess County to add 30 poll workers for the Nov. 8 election. The county is estimating that 50,000 voters could cast ballots on Election Day.

House said the voter turnout in previous presidential election years was about 68 percent in 2008 and 63 percent in 2012.

WKU Public Radio is providing up-to-date primary election results online starting this evening at 6pm central, 7 eastern time. We'll be focusing on Kentucky House and Senate primary races throughout our listening area, as well as a few US House primaries.