Election

Daviess County

Daviess County is expecting a record turnout on Election Day that could go as high as 70 percent of registered voters.

Daviess County’s chief election officer, Richard House, says the anticipated high voter turnout is due to a combination of national, state and local races that are generating a lot of interest.

“I think both sides are really polarized as far as the presidential race is concerned. We have several State House races here in Daviess County that are competitive. We’re going to have a new mayor. We’re going to have new city commissioners. So we have a lot of local interest in this race.”

Lots of candidates have stepped up to the plate in Daviess County. Five are running for mayor of Owensboro. Ten people are running for four seats on the Owensboro City Commission.

“We also have our first family court judge and there are four candidates running really competitive races,” said House. “That’s a non-partisan office and it’s the first time we’ve ever had a family court judge. So that’s been drawing a lot of attention.”

Expectations of high voter turnout are leading Daviess County to add 30 poll workers for the Nov. 8 election. The county is estimating that 50,000 voters could cast ballots on Election Day.

House said the voter turnout in previous presidential election years was about 68 percent in 2008 and 63 percent in 2012.

WKU Public Radio is providing up-to-date primary election results online starting this evening at 6pm central, 7 eastern time. We'll be focusing on Kentucky House and Senate primary races throughout our listening area, as well as a few US House primaries.

Even though the presidential nomination process is effectively over, Kentuckians can still vote for candidates other than Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama in tomorrow's primary. Republicans can cast ballots for Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul, even though they're no longer in the running. And Democrats will be able to choose 'uncommitted' instead of President Obama.

But University of Louisville political scientist Dewey Clayton says those other names don't really matter.

Newly-released documents show that a Northern Kentucky businessman is the  primary donor and a significant fundraiser for a super PAC that’s involved in Kentucky’s Fourth Congressional District race. But super PAC officials say the man has no official role with the group.