expanded gambling

Governor Beshear says he’s willing to make changes to his proposed casino gambling amendment in response to complaints from lawmakers. The plan unveiled by Beshear this week would allow up to five casinos at horseracing tracks, and two freestanding casinos in other parts of the state.

Changes could already be coming to Governor Steve Beshear’s proposed gambling amendment. That amendment would allow up to seven casinos in Kentucky, with five of them based at horse racing tracks. House Speaker Greg Stumbo supports expanded gaming in Kentucky, but he still has major questions about the amendment. And Stumbo says those questions will likely lead to changes to the measure if it can pass the state Senate.

After weeks of waiting, Governor Steve Beshear and state Senator Damon Thayer have unveiled their constitutional amendment for expanded gambling.

The amendment allows for up to seven casinos in Kentucky, but five must be at horse racing tracks. The two free-standing casinos cannot be within sixty miles of a track, regardless of whether that track has a casino.

A newly-formed coalition of businesses, unions and education groups have teamed up to get a constitutional amendment for gambling on the ballot in Kentucky.

The group is called the Kentucky Alliance for Jobs. It's a 501(c)(4), meaning it can raise money and advertise to support casino gaming.

The alliance is led by the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce. Chamber President Dave Adkisson says the coalition is large and diverse, and the members don't always get along.

Responding to critics, Governor Steve Beshear says he believes he already has ample support in the state Senate to send an expanded gambling amendment to the ballot.

A key opponent to expanded gambling in Kentucky says the bill doesn’t have the votes to pass this legislative session.

For years, the Family Foundation has mounted strong opposition to Governor Steve Beshear’s chief legislative issue. The group’s senior analyst, Martin Cothran, says Beshear’s proposal will fall short in the Senate if it's voted on soon.

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